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ERIC 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

BUREAU OF EDUCATION BULLETIN (1929) ■ No. 2 


SELF-HELP 

for 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

BUREAU OF EDUCATION 


BULLETIN. 1929. No. 2 

— . 

| 

* 

SELF-HELP 

I for 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 

! By 

WALTER J. GREENLEAF 

ASSOCIATE SPECIALIST 
IN HIGHER EDUCATION 





UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
WASHINGTON : 1929 




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ADDITIONAL COPIES 

or THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED VrOM 
THE SUPERINTENDENT Of DOCUMENTS 
U. 8.00 VERNM ENT PRINTING OFTICI 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

AT 

25 CENTS PER COPY 


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CONTENTS 


Letter of transmittal 

Part J. — Going to College: 

'Transition from high school to college • 

Financial aspects 

Student loan funds 

Part II.— Self-Help: 

Choice of what to do 

Finding the job 

Earning one’s way through college 

Part III.— Institutions of higher learning — a directory by 8tates 
Inder 

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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 


Department of the Interior, 

Bureau of Education, 
Washington, D. C., January 8, 1929. 

Sir: Inquiries constantly come to this office from piospective 
students who wish to know of the possibilities of self-help in this or that 
institution. Such information from an unbiased and authoritative 
source is clearly necessary to enable young men and women and 
theii parents to decide intelligently the momentous question of 
college attendance. The Bureau of Education should be prepared 
to supply it. 

I havp, therefore, asked Dr. Walter J. Greenleat, associate specialist 
in higher education, to assemble the facts that bear upon this problem. 
The result of his efforts is presented herewith. I recommend that it 
be published as a bulletin of the Bureau of Education. 

Respectfully submitted. 

L. A. Kalbach, 

Acting Commissioner. 

Ihe Secretary of the Interior. 

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SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Part I. — Going to College 

More than 1,000 institutions of higher learning in the United States 
are now offering work college grade to some 900,000 students. 
These institutions include regular 4-3 r ear colleges and universities, 
independent professional schools specializing in law,, medicine, den- 
tistry, theology, engineering, etc., 2-year junior colleges, colleges for 
training teachers, and colleges especially i or negro youth. 

The first college (Harvard College) was established in Massachu- 
setts in 1636. Since that time the increase in the number of institu- 
tions, in educational plants and equipment, and in enrollments of 
students from all sections of the country jms been phenomenal. 
Present-day colleges scattered from East to West have developed in 
accordance with educational demands to meet specific, needs in their 
localities. Their aims and purposes, however, are not alike; their 
standards and courses are not uniform; some are exclusively for men, 
£ome exclusively for women, and many are coeducational. Their 
size and financial support vary widely, and the range of their tuition 
rates and fees is considerable. 

With such a variety of institutions, the selection of a college for the 
individual is no longer a simple matter; but it is a vital problem for 
the young man or woman who must make the decision. 

Expense . — Since 1920 the average student probably spends about 
1700 per year for a college education. The economical college man 
or college woman spends, less. The following table shows averages 
for all institutions, tuition charges, extra lees, board and room rates 
&nd a minimum expense which covers one year’s residence. The 
minimum expense doefe not include clothes, amusements, or travel. 

a 

Minimum student ca penses (averages) 



Tuition 

Annual 

fees 

Board 
and room 

Minimum 

annual 

expense 

l Four-year Institutions 

1 $153 
184 
184 
134 

113 
124 
283 
232 
ITS 
165 

66 

114 
66 

... - 

» tto 
41 
28 
27 

338* 

380 

281 

226 

1647 

620 

628 

407 

314 

1. Men'* colleges 

2. Women's college* 

3. Coeducational Institutions _ . _ 

D. Professional schools for- 

. 4. Theology (mostly free) 

5. Law 


6. Medicine 

20 

470 

026 

7. Dentistry 

1. Pharmacy * 




9. Osteopathy : 




fjj- Teachers colleges 

20 

240 

336 

A 437 

200 

Iv. Junior colleges (many free) 

». Negro oolieges 

16 

163 



* In publicly supported Institutions Includes nonreel dent retee only. 


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BELT-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


Tuition in the privately endowed colleges and universities runs as 
high as $450 per year (Princqjkon), while in the State and municipal 
institutions which are tax-supported, the rate, not including fees, is 
the lowest — often free, to residents of the State or city. Nearly every 
college or university has raised its student fees, however, in the past 
10 years, and further increases may be expected. Notwithstanding 
these increases, the charge does not cover the actual expense of 
educating a Student. In - men’s colleges and in women's colleges 
tuition rates are considerably higher (averaging $184) than in the 
coeducational institutions, where the average is $134. A inoro careful 
analysis of tuition rates is shown in the following table: 

Tuitions compared for regular Si-year institutions offcri>\ courses in arts and 

{sciences « 


Colleges and unU^rsitios under— 

Total 
number 
of 4-yeur 
Institu- 
tion.* 

t 

Per cent 
of all 
college 
students 
enrolled 

Accredited 

institutions 

nSjM 4< -redded 
Institutions 

Number 

A vorage 
tuition 

Number 

A ve rage 
tuition 

Public control r 

10ft 

40 

89 

i $137 

17 

*4138 

N'nnvftHrinn private control .. . 

142 

31 

114 

2V> 

28 

m 

Church control 

37ft 

20 

184 

167 

1U1 

18 


Total 

m 

100 

388 

186 

23H 




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i Figures represent nonresident tuition plus foes, for State resident*, tuition and fees average $78 Elw- 
where in this bulletin tuition in publicly supported institutions is considered separately from annual fees. 

.•* v . . 

From this table it will be seen that tuition is the highest in the 
privately controlled nonsectarian colleges and universities which are 
accredited, and considerably less in accredited institutions under 
chprch control. Only a $9 difference appears in the average tuition 
between accredited institutions under public control and the non- 
accredited institutions under church control. Tho averago charge in 
the accredited and nonaccredited State institutions is^-actically the 
same, xhe rates shown for publicly controlled institutions represent 
the total scholastic^ charge — that is, tuition plus annual fees — while in 
the other institutions tuition only is considered and annual fees which 
are usually charged aranof shown. 1 * 


Board and room, ofe of the largest items on the sttident expense 
account, varies from $108 to $650 per year. In the coeducational 
institutions the average is-$2Sl ; in colleges which separate the sexe^ 
the average is higher; w r hile in teachers' colleges the average is lower.. 
Frequently college cafeterias located on the campus furnish meals 
to students at cost. 

Minimum expense for one college year of 36 weeks in residence 
averages $547 ill the 4-year colleges and universities. This is a fair 

> Publicly controlled Institution* frequently Impose “annual foes” or “annual fliod charges’' In lion 4 
or in Buldltion to, tuition tecs; wich annual fees ere In effect tuition tees. In the privately iupportod loiUWr 
l tool the whole chaqpt tor tuition U usually expressed Ip the tuition fee, 

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GOING TO COLLEGE 


estimate obtained in 1928 of the entire expenses of an economical 
student but dqes not include items of travel, clothes, or off-campus 
amusements. For coeducational institute as the average is $497 
and Js more in the men’s colleges and women’s colleges, but less in 
the teachers’ colleges. 

Such college expenses as furniture, fraternity fees, theaters, clothes, 
travel, and incidentals are so variable and depend to such an extent 
on individual character, thrift, and taste, that a student should add 

to the minimum figure whatever extras he considers essential to his 
needs. • + 

It is not necessary to pay excessive sums for a college education; 
$500 will pay the entire expenses of an economical student in nearly 
one-half of the regular 4-year colleges and universities. In ot) 

, men’s colleges, 43 women’s colleges, and 245 coeducational institutions 
estimates varying from $200 (Park College, Mo.) to $500 are made 
fthich cover an economical student’s necessary expenses for one college 
year. This means that tuition rates in those institutions are low, 
living cost is reasonable, and with the exception of clothes, travel,’ 
and off-campus amusements, the estimates cover actual student needs’. 

Transition from High School to College 

More than a mere changing of schools, the transition from high 
school to college is a period of breaking home ties, of adjustments to 
eoUcge hfe, of changing conceptions, of learning to think for one’s 
self, of forming new opinions, and of broadening under the influence 
of now friends and new environments. The life of a high-school 
student is well regulated. At homp parents inculcate regular habits 
of eating, sleeping, and living, and supervise religious, social, and 
moral training. In school, teachers impart knowledge, supervise 
study and make monthly reports of progress. Comrades grow up 
together undt'r home influences where they accept little adult respon- 
sibility. In all of their activities, they are praised, admonished, and 
supervised by their elders. 

In college there is a new freedom and a new environment to which 
he must make adjustments. Unlike high schopl, college draws 
student from all parts of the United States and even from foreign 
countries. . Registration day finds the provincial, the urban, the rich, 
the poor, the worker, and the dreamer, all strangers to each other, 
and all facuig the same freshman problems of choosing places to livj, 
courses friends, and activities. Each is independently responsible 
tor his hfe and habits. College life ih dormitories, fraternities, ‘blubs, 
and boarding houses is far removed from the home surroundings to 
w c tho student has been accustomod. Collcg^lesson assignments 
include numerous reference books rather than a single text. College 



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SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


lectures are innovations to the new student. Instead of being super- 
vised, the college student is frequently free to study or not as he 
pteases, provided be passes the quizzes and final examinations. 

In college the first days and the first year are critical in a student’s 
career. On his own responsibility, the freshman is doubtful about 
the choice of courses, instructors, and activities. In his dilemma 
he may turn to upper classmen who have been through the process, 
and may eagerly take their advice on many matters from c • ricula to 
athletics. Obviously it is impossible for the president of a large 
college or university to greet and personally advise each member of 
,the freshman class. However, in order that the new student shall be 
properly informed about his opportunities, many institutions require 
all incoming freshmen to be in residence on the campus a few days or a 
week before the opening of the college. 

This period is known as “freshman week.” The University of 

Maine first instituted freshman week in 1923 and devoted the time to 
« 

testing the students and acquainting them with .the customs and 
habits of the university. A recent program included lectufes on 
taking notes, examinations, use of library, use of books, college 
duties and responsibilities, the colleges of the university, college 
students' day’s work, college customs, cultural reading, social con- 
duct, current university problems and honor societies, hygiene and 
physical training, and higher obligations of life. The freshmen were 
photographed, examined physically, taken for a tour and inspection of 
the campus and buildings, organized as a class, and entertained 
socially. During this period the freshmen have the entire campus 
practically to themselves and less confusion results in the proper 
selection of courses of study. By the time the upper classmen arrive, 
the freshmen are acquainted with each other, with the faculty, and 
with the institution, and the newness of the environment has worn 
off to the -extent that they are ready to settle down to work. This 
period in the transition from high school to college aids in early 
adjustment and gives a better insight into the purposes and routine 
of college work. g 

During this period the now student will be occupied in securing 
room and board. The room question can often be settled before the 
student leaves home if ho sends to the college treasurer a small deposit 
in order to secure a dormitory reservation. In some colleges all 
members of the freshman classes are expected to live » the freshman 
dormitories — that is, in dormitories exclusively for new students 
For convenience and college association, dormitory rooms are more 
desirable than off-campus 'accommodations in private homes. Som« 
institutions are providing cooperative houses for college girls — that k, 
houses or cottages owned by the college where the occupants may 
reduce living expenses by doing their own housework. In 



GOING TO COLLEGE 


6 


University of Minnesota, rental in the women’s cooperative cottages 
is the same for all students — $22.50 per quarter, and the other expenses 
never run over $20 per month; with the exception of the cooking and 
weekly cleaning, students do all of the work, which requires about 
20 minutes a day. Smith College, Wellesley, Mount Holyoke, 
Tulane University, University of Vermont, Baker University, and 
Meredith College,' likew^e maintain cooperative houses for college 
ghls. In case an institution does not provide dormitories, the 
students live in clubs, fraternities, and private homes, and the 
college office cooperates in finding suitable rooms for students by 
keeping on file a carefully selected list of rooming houses. Board 
is obtained in the college commons, dining hall, or cafeteria, in 
fraternities, clubs, restaurants, and private homes, according to the 
facilities or plan of the college. 

The class schedule is of primary consideration. A few specialize 
at once in a professional course, but the majority begin with the 
general' arts and science work. The numerous professional fields 
which include architecture, art, dentistry, education, engineering 
journalism, law, medicine, music, pharmacy, theology^ science, and 
others, generally require one or two years of arts and science subjects, 
and for Jhat reason final decision is likely to be deferred um.il after 
the first year. For a liberal arts course (arts and science) the fresh- 
man is somewhat limited in his choice of subjects. He is usually 
required to take physical training, English, a modern language, a 
choice between mathematics, Latin, Greek, or a science, for the bach- 
elor s degree, and one free elective. Several institutions are offering 
special freshman courses or “orientation courses” designed to co- 
ordinate general study. “The orientation course is intended to unif y 
the material of the curriculum; to constitute what may be called, * 
following the terminology of vocational education, a pre-educational 
course. More specifically it is intended to train the student to think 
and to introduce him to a general survey of the nature of the world 
and of man.” 2 FrosJpmn courses are nocessarily distributed in sev- 
eral schools or departments within an institution. One may find in 
a university a separate school of engineering with departments of 
civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering, and a head professor in 
charge of each division. In the liberal arts college there are usually 
departments of English, economics, mathematics, languages, history 
and government, psychology, and othere, the number of departments 
increasing with the size of the institution. New students should 
consult with the departmental officers of instruction and administra- 
tion before completing registration. When the Selection of courses 
ie made, the freshman may usually arrange his class schedule with 
y option b etween morning and afternoon classes. Many elect 

'U. 8. Bur. of Educ. Bui. 100, No. % “Ulxbar oducotioo.” Arthur J. KTtn 



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SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


morning classes in order to leave the afternoons free for college activ- 
ities or employment; for the self-help student this is important. 

Extracurricular activities (outside of the classroom) are of next 
importance. Every college man and college woman should plan to 
go out for some form of recreational exercise. College athletics, 
properly handled and controlled, are a worthwhile part of college 
life and advance a student in popularity and self-control. If tem- 
pered with scholarship and culture, athletics serve to round out the 
ideal college student and leader. The major sports — football, basket- 
ball, track, rowing, and hockey, besides numerous minor sports like 
te nn is, golf, swimming,' etc., provide wholesome competition. Even 
an indifferent freshman will find real pleasure in taking up some 
sport which he can continue after leaving college. Constant effort 
is being made to interest every student in, some form of physical 
exercise, and each will doubtless have opportunity to enter sports 
' for which he shows a natural fondness. 

Musical clubs, bands, debating teams, scientific and literary soci- 
eties, art clubs, dramatic clubs, sectional clubs, college journalism, 
Young Men’s Christian Association and Young Women’s Christian 
Association units, and other extracurricular activities are described 
in the Freshman Handbooks which are published annually by the 
college Christian associations. While these activities are largely 
social, they are often educative and furnish a valuable outlet for 
student enterprise. 

Greek letter societies or fraternities — another phase of college life 
affecting the new student — are found in nearly all colleges. Fraterni- 
ties in college should not be confused with those in high school, h) 
college they are widely accepted as substitutes for home life, while in 
' high school they are simply social clubs of doubtful value. National 
fraternities are generally represented in all sections of the country, 
local fraternities are peculiar to local institutions. The lodges estab- 
lished in the various colleges are called “chapters." In a few colleges 
fraternities are prohibited, but club life akin to that in fraternities is 
substituted by independent clubs, college unions, and student cottages. 
Most fraternities aim to provide agreeable homes, forbid any dissipa- 
tion in the chapter houses, encourage scholarship, and promote 
mutual helpfulness among members. Chapters of the same fraternity 
vary noticeably in different colleges. Fraternity members are chosen 
by invitation only. Before a freshman accepts an invitation he should 
acquaint himself with the merits of the several fraternity groups in 
his college.' 

Finally, the new student should make personal acquaintance with 
the dean of men (if a man student), or the dean of women (if a woman 
student). These deans usuall y maintain offices where students art 

i Fee further Information ooneolt Baird’ • Minna] of American Coltof* FratenilM— 



going to college 


invited to bring their personal problems. The dean’s duties have been 
described as follows: Counsel, on personal problems of students- 
cooperation with student government; oversight of extracurricular 
activities, housing, and academic progress of students; handling dis- 
cipline; cooperation with religious organizations; direction of part- 
time employment of students; and interpretation of college policies 
to the public. In some institutions the dean is known as adviser to 
students, dean of students, counselor of freshmen, etc., with only a 
part of the duties outlined above, but in general their chief work is to 
advise students for their personal welfare. Parents with student 

problems are encouraged to communicate and cooperate with the 
deans. v._ 

Financial Aspects of Going to College 

Parents who desire to finance a college education for their children 
by saving over a period of years should consider educational insurance 
as a convenient method. Life insurance companies write special edu- 
cational policies on the life of the father or mother, payable at the 
time the student enters college. For example, suppose the parent is 
35 years of age and has a 6-year-old son. The parent insures his own 
life for a period of 12 years. This is a deferred endowment policy 
which matures when the child is 18 years of age and presumably 
ready to enter college. For each *1,000 of insurance a policy costs at 
the rate of approximately *75 per year, or *6.50 per month, and for 
four college years will pay the student about *25 per month for each 
11,000 insurance. If the parent becomes disabled or dies before the 
insurance matures the policy is paid up, and the fund held in trust 
until (he child becomes years old. The amount is then either paid 
in one sum, or distributed over the 4-year period in 48 monthly checks 
according to the agreement. 

For the student with a small income systematic saving is the only 
sure method of accumulating money for an education. The habit of 
saving should be acquired early. If *1 a week is saved in the bank 
for four years while going to high school » student will have about 
1220 saved for a college education. Christmas savings clufe which 
have lately become popular all over the country operate on the syste- 
matic savings plan. Regular deposits of small sums are made each 
week until the club matures in December when a check for the amount 
saved plus interest is mailed to the depositor. One feature of this 
plan is that deposits which are made every week may not be withdrawn 
until the maturity of the club. Building and loan association* offer a 
more attractive plan for the small investor who wishes to save over 
a period of years. Statistics show that the first *100 is the hardest to 
accumulate. Although the earning capacity of young men and young 
women in high school is limited, generally some hobby or avocation 


8 / SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

will assist them in earning aJittle money which can be saved regularly 
toward a college education. * 

A survey Was made at Central High School, Washington, D. C., in 
J926 to determine the number of students who were actually employed 
during the school year. Out of 3,000 students enrolled, 230 boys and 
15 girls reported that they were working during spare time. Of tho 
first-year students who were employed the average age was 15 yeare; 
the majority of these students carried newspapers, and earned on an 
average of 42 cents per hour for 13 hours’ work per week. Of the 
seniors who were employed, the average age was 18 years. They 
worked as salesmen, clerks at soda fountains, newspaper employees, 
musicians, office workers, auto mechanics, filling-station attendants, 
moving-picture operators, gymnasium instructors, collectors, pages, 
painters, etc., and averaged YlYi hours of employment per week at 
59 cents per hour, thus earning about $10.50 per week. "Some of 
these workers were obliged to work to remain in high school, while 
others were saving for a college education. 

Farm boys and girls have different methods. They utilize the 
farms, roadside markets, village stores, households, and any local 
enterprise to turn spare time into cash. Many df these students are 
agents for weekly magazines. Besides selling the publications at 
cash commissions, they receive certain rewards and prizes which are 
worth while. 

Students, once registered in college, will find several funds available 
for continuing their education. Scholarships, fellowships, prizes, and 
loans are listed in college catalogues and the number of funds usually 
increase with the size of the endowment of the college. Likewise 
independent foundations, societies, organizations, and some States 
maintain scholarships and loans for a limited number of qualified 

students. ' 

Scholarships . — An ordinary scholarship for the purpose of aiding 
deserving students is usually a cash sum or the income on an invested 
fund which is donated by a friend of the college and often named for 
the benefactor. Awards are made according to the terms of the trust 
to students who make high grades, to sons or daughters of ministers, 
to students bearing the family name of the donor, to men and women 
who reside in a certain section of the country, to needy students, to 
those who work out the value in service to the college, to high-school 
seniors who rank first in their classes, and to many students who art 
otherwise able to qualify for the money. Scholarship fundB aw 
frequently raised by States,* counties, high-echool alumni, and local 
dubs for the purpose of sending to college high-school graduates of 
proved ability who are bkely to profit by a higher education. Som* 
colleges award scholarships to their freshmen without obligation of 


GOING TO COLLEGE) 


repayment, but frequently such aid to upper classmen must be repaid 
after graduation when regular salaries are earned: 

La Verne Noyes scholarships were established under the will of 
La Verne Noyes to pay to such universities or colleges as the trustees 
may from time to time select, the tuition in part or in full, of deserving 
students needing this assistance to enable them to procure a college 
training. Scholarships are awarded without regard to difference of 
sex, race, religion, or political party, to citizens of the United States 
who (1) shall themselves have served in the United States Army or 
Navy in the World War (April 6, 1917), and were honorably dis- 
charged from such service, or (2) shall be descended by blood from 
some one who has honorably served in the Army or Navy of the 
United States in the World War. Students eligible should make 
application directly to one of the following institutions which have 
been assigned scholarships (1928-29): 

Illinois. Blackburn College, Bradley Polytechnic Institute, Carthage Col- 
lege, Eureka College, Illinois College, Illinois Wesleyan University, KnojfCoUege, 
lake Forest College, Lewis InstituteWLombard College, James Milliken Uni- 
versity , Monmouth College, JOorth Central College, Northwestern University 
Rush Medical College, Shurtleff College, University of Illinois, Wheaton College, 
and loung Men’s Christian Association College. 

Indiana. Franklin College, Indiana University, Purdue Univereity and 
Wabash College. 

Iowa. Coe College, Cornell College, Drake University, Grinnell College 
Iowa State College, State University of Iowa. 

Kansas. University of Kansas, Baker University, Washburn College, William 
Jewel College. . 

Maryland. — Johns Hopkins University. 

Massachusetts. — Amherst College. 

Minnesota. Carleton College, Hamline University, and University of 
Minnesota. 

Missouri. Park College, University of Missouri, Washington University, and 
Central College. 

Nebraska. Doane College and University of Nebraska. 

» New York . — Cornell University. 

North Dakota. — University of North Dakota. 

Ohio.— Denison University, Oberlin College, and College of Wooster. 

Oklahoma. — University of Oklahoma. 

South Dakota. — University of 8outh Dakota. 

Texas . — Rice Institute and University of Texas. 

Wisconsin. Beloit College, Lawrenoe College, and University of Wisconsin. 

A fund of $1G,000 (Price Greenleaf aid) is distributed annually in 
Harvard in sums from $100 to $400 first to freshmen and second to 
deserving students who have not succeeded in the competition for 
scholarships. “The regular assignment to freshmen is mrfde before 
or at the time of their entrance. To hope for a share in this assign- 
ment the applicant must be strongly recommended by the academy 
or school with which he has been connected. * • .* Awards are 


10 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


made to reduce the general expenses necessarily incurred by under- 
graduates of the college in pursuing the studies required to obtain ! 
the degree of bachelor of arts, who are not of themselves, or with the I 
aid of their parents, of sufficient pecuniary ability to pay for the , 
same.”. The recipients of this aid may, be called upon for service as I 
monitors or assistants. 

Actual cash is seldom awarded. The value of a scholarship is 
usually applied to college tuition and not spent tor pefsonal needs 
such as board or clothes. On a certain date, specified in the college 
catalogue, scholarship awards are made and late applications can not 
be considered for the current year. Complete lists of scholarships, 
together with the rules governing their award, are generally given in 
the catalogue of each college and university. Upon request these 
institutions will supply application blanks to those who desire to 
apply for scholarship aid. 

Honor scholarships differ from ordinary scholarships jn that they 
are won only by ability, high grades, and superior work without 
regard for need. These are competitive, and are awarded for excel-' j 
lence in classroom work and activities. For example, two Rhodes j 
scholarships are assigned to <4ach State tenable for three years at 
Oxford (England). The^fcipend is about J2JJOO per year, and the 
award is made to a male citizen of the United States, between 19 and 
25 years of age, who has completed at least his sophomore year in a 
college in the United States — on a basis of scholastic ability , leader- 
ship, and physical vigor. Complete information may be obtained 
from President Frank Aydelotte, general secretary of the Rhodes 
Scholarship Trust in the United States, Swarthmore College, Swarth- 
inore, Pa. 

Fellowships. — Fellowships, awarded in certain American and 
English universities, are practically the same as scholarships except 
that they are granted to graduate students designated as fellows, 
and the amounts are usually sufficient for at least a year's majnte- i 
nance. ’Fellowships maintained in the graduate schools of the uni- 
versities offer graduate students opportunities for research and 
graduate work in specialized fields. 

Prizes . — Al tho ugh prizes are usually relatively small sums as com- 
pared with the yield from scholarships, it is worth while for students 
to familiarize themselves with tho prizes listed in the college cata- 
logues. Contests in English, Latin, Bible study, and other courses 
besides declamations, essays, orations, athletics, debates, and other 
forms of college activity are usually open to student competition. | 
Prizes of $10 to *50 are frequently awarded to winners of these con- 
tests but few are awarded to freshmen. To plan for any of these 
rewards before actual residence in college is unwise since they are 
given for special ability without regard to need. 


GOING TO CPLLEGE. ' 

Studeni, Joans . W e are living in what appears to be the “install- 
ment age” — where products of any sort can be bought on the install- 
ment plan — so much down, and so much per month. Slogans “Buy 
now ^ pay next year, ’ “Ride as you pay,” “Investigate our budget 
plan, and many more appear daily in every newspaper, end every- 
thing from automobile tires to real estatecan be bought on the deferred- 
payment plan. Higher education is no exception to the rule. As an 
interest-bearing investment, a college education paid for over a 
period of years will yield larger returns than many of the passing 
luxuries purchased on the installment plan. 

Students who desire to finance their education on this plan should 
do so in a businesslike manner. A promissory note is generalle 
written promising to repay the loan of money at a future time, uncon- 
ditionally. Interest at the rate of 6 per cent is the customary charge, 
and loans are seldom made without security. Security is some form 
of guaranty which renders certain that the money will be repaid. 

“What security cun you offer?” is the familiar question which the 
borrower hears when he first applies for a loan. / And what security, 
indeed, can the student offer without funds, without property, real or 
personal, and without tangible assets? If ho receives the benefits 
of a higher education, he hopes to make good and to repay borrowed 
money. His promise is, of course, appraised according to his char- 
acter. As for a college education, its money value has never been 
determined; it is a requirement in professions, many vocations, and 
some industries, but its worth varies^with different colleges, courses 
of study, and individuals. Honesty, character, industry, and ability 
to profit by a higher education, then, are a student’s securities which 
warrant consideration. On this basis many agencies are making 
character loans to students whom they believe will be good risks, 
will use loans to good advantage, will profit by training, will graduate, 
and will find suitable employment by winch to repay the money 
borrowed. 

In 282 colleges and universities, funds totaling nearly $4,000,000 
are loaned annually to students of character and ability for the pur- 
pose of completing their college education. Although these funds 
are administered by the several institutions, there is no uniformity 
is to the manner in which they are handled. Various conditions are 
imposed, according to the policy of the institution, the need of the 
student, Ability of his parents, locality, restrictions imposed b^donore, 
and other factors. In some cases no interest whatever is charged, 
while in others the rates run as high as 8 per cent, but 6 per cent is the 
usual requirement. Individual loans average $100 to $150 and 
tnany are twice as large. Repayment generally begins at a stated 
panod after graduation. It is not possible to state here the institu- 
tions providing loans nor the students eligible for them. As soon as a 
I 31596°— 29 2 



12 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

ERIC 


student decides upon the institution to be attended, he should then 
find out by correspondence what loan funds and scholarships are 
available and what self-help opportunities may later be open to him. 
Applications for these institutional loans should be made directly to 
the dean of the college in question, who will provide proper blinks and 
specific information. A composite summary of the items which 
appear on loan applications from different colleges includes the 

following : 

Parents’ names and occupations. Brothers and sisters. 

Church affiliation? 

Member of lodge, f ratemity , or other society? 

Length of attendance at this college. Other colleges attended. 

For what calling or profession are you preparing yourself? 

If you have any property in your own possession or held in trust for you, 
state definitely the amount, form, and income per year. 

Do you hold a life-insurance policy? Describe. 

Is anyone dependent upon you? Are you married? 

What is the amount of your present indebtedness? Give details. 

How much do you wish to borrow for the coming school year? 

If you arc granted a loan from the coUege, how would you plan to pay it? 

Make an estimate of the income you will have and ^our expenses for the 
coming school year. 

If not already at college, give a brief statement of high-school activities- 
athletics, organizations, etc., or anything you have done for your school 

or community. , . 

j Give references— two or three persons, property owners or professional 

men who know you and your finances. 

Do you use tobacco? Intoxicating liquors? 

Is it your intention to graduate here? 

What plans have $ou for self-support? 

Make out your budget for the last school year. 

Estimate your budget for the prcsent^chool year. 

On many of the blanks the student^ requested to give a careful 
account of his income and expenditures. Budgeting one’s personal 
finances should be started in high school. If it becomes necessary to 
borrow, such a budget serves as a measure of a student's financial 
ability, his dependability, and his efficiency in the use of money 
Those who are able to give financial information readily are considered 
better risks than those who spend hit or miss without planning * 
personal budget. Filling out application blanks for loans should be 
done with special care as the committee that authorizes the loans 
will make no awards to careless applicants. 

Banking institutions, especially in the large cities, seldom ton 
money to students without security in the form of stocks, bonds, red 
estate, etc. In a few cities trust companies cooperate with lociU 
colleges which guarantee student loans, but sdeh loans seldom extend 
beyond the college session. In Brown University the committee on 


r 


GOING TO COLLEGE 


13 


loans cooperates with the Rhode Island Hospital Trust Co., in making 
loans to students. The total loans authorized each year do notexceed 
$50,000, Individual loans are in denominations of $50 or $100 and 
in ho case more than $400 per semester. No student may borrow 
more than $800 during his four years of college. When the com- 
mittee authorizes a loan, the tmst company accepts the student's 
note with the indorseVhent of the university and deducts interest at 
6 per cent for six months in advance. Renewals and additional loans 
may be authorized only upon payment of interest. Upon gradua- 
tion the student may negotiate a new note for the full amount bor- 
rowed and pay semiannual installments which arc applied on interest 
and principal over a period of 1 to 10 years, 1 year being allowed for 
repayment of each $100. The university is charged with defaulted 
notetff if any. This plan is not general throughout the country, but 
is beffig tried out in several cities. For the student w ithout resources, 
the banks offer no assistance. / 

Personal notes are: sometimes accepted by individuals when they 
lend money to college students. This is of course a personal matter 
between the lender and thp student, the former being personally 
acquainted with the latter and believing that he will repay the loan 
when he is able. Only a few students have this opportunity. To 
protect the lender in the event of the aeath of the borrower, the 
student who has no other security should take out life insurance in 
his own name, and make an assignment of the policy to the person 
who is willing to lend him money. It costs about $12.50 per year 
for an 18-year-old student to take out a $1,000 straight life policy. 
When he has repaid the loan after graduation he may redeem the 
policy and convert the insurance to suit his pleasure. 

' Many educational loan funds ore administered by independent 
agencies to aid boys and girls in college. Some of these funds, 

■ established years ago by subscription or collection, have been admin- 
istered in such a way that the original amounts have increased many 
times over. To be eligible for a. loan from any of these organizations 
a student must present superior credentials as to character, scholar- 
physical and mental ability, and directness of purpose. Some 
funds are restricted to students in affiliated colleges, to men, to 
women, to State residents, to religious denomination, or to course. 
In all cases the student who borrows must be a “good risk.” The 
following references on student loan funds are merely suggestive and 
in no sense complete. Information concerning these funds was 
obtained by sending questionnaires to agencies and foundations which 
were presumed to aid students. 


14 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


Student 



GENERAL FUNDS FOR MEN AND WOKEN STUDENTS IN THE UNITED STATES 

Barrelt — F. J. Barrett Foundation , 1600 Davison Avenue, East, Detroit, Mich., 

% established a student loan fund of 1100,000 in 1926. Juniors and seniors in 
acoeptcd colleges arc eligible for loans when they pass as to character and proba- 
bility of paying as agreed; examinations, interviews, and recommendations arc 
required. Forty loans were made last year in amounts varying from $146 to 
$400. Interest at 6 per cent is charged; repayments begin January 1 aLer June 
graduation at the rate of $5 per month for Rix months, and thereafter $10 per 
month. All borrowers in aify particular college in any one year are organized 
into a group and a 5 per cent bonus is repaid when all the students in a particular 
group have paid in full. 

Crawford studnd loan fund , care of United States National Bank, Portland, 
Oreg., was established in 1924 with $250,000. Any student properly recom- 
mended is eligible, except those preparing for a professional career such as theol- 
ogy, medicine, law, or music* Interest at 5 per cent is charged and repayment 
at $10. per month begins six months after graduation. Last year 110 loans 
totaling $19,609 were made; average size $190; maximum, $800; $41,576 is now 
outstanding. 

Educational Alliance , 197 East Broadway, New York City, made 14 loans 
totaling $1,935 last year. Individual merit is considered. 

Elks — Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Grand Lodge, 2750 Lake View 
Avenue, Chicago, 111. The Elks National Foundation Commission keeps in 
touch with the respective Slate associations on activities of this nature, but 
makes no loans. Loans are available through local lodges. 

Grange — Massachusetts State Grange , care of William M. Howard, North 
Easton, Mass.; New York State Grange, care of Fred J. Freestone, Interlaken, 
N. Y., and other State granges maintain student loan funds for members. 

Harmon Foundation (hie.), division of student loans, 140 Nassau Street, New 
York City, in 1922 established a fund of $150,000 to be loaned to students in 
affiliated colleges. To be eligible a studenWmist be of junior standing or above,, 
working toward a bachelor or higher degree with satisfactory character reference? 1 
and approved budget. A Harmon-Collcge cooperation loan fund is also estab- 
lished to aid students of sophomore grade and above. A special student loan 
fund aids juniors and seniors in unaffiliated colleges. German students are 
recommended by the Institute of International Education. In 1927-28 a total 
of $302,315 was outstanding in loans. Of this amount, including trust and co- 
operative money, $1 16,275 was loaned durii\g the year. An average of 350 loans 
♦ In varying amounts from $150 to $300 are made annually at 6 per cent interest. 
Repayments begin six months after graduation at the rate of $5 a iqonth to take 
care of accumulated interest and six months later at the rate of $10 a month. 
Additional 7 to 10 per cent (g'uup guarantee) is charged to students and re- 
funded with interest when the groups' payments arc complete. 

Hebrew Free Loan Society , 108 Second Avenue, New York City, lends to student* 
irrespective of nationality, religion, or race without interest if credentials arc 
satisfactory. 

^ Hester Foundation (Inc.), Post-office box 163, Berkeley, Calif,, established in 
1928 a fund of $20,000 to lend to juniors and seniors in colleges. 

AY teams International , 164 West Jacksoi^ Boulevard, Chicago, 111., representing 
1,750 Kiwanis Clubs in the United States, reports that many of the local clut# 
lend money to local students who are worthy, 


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GOING TO COLLEGE 


15 


Knights Templar Educational Foundation, established an educational loan fund 
of $1,560,000 in 1022 to aid junio0 l and seniors of good character and application 
upon recommendation of the college and home community. The fund receives 
an annual addition of about *500,000 and the total amount of loans outstanding 
the last fiscal year was 11,342,000. From 1924 to 1927 there were 8,398 in- 
dividual loans of $150 to $200 made with rates of interest varying in different 
States from 5 to 0 per cent. Repayments are begun one year after graduation. 

Applications for loans shouftfbe made to the grand recorder of the Grand 
Commandcry, Knights Templar Educational Foundation, in the respective 
States. The State addresses arc as follows: Montgomery, Ala.; Tucson, Arorf 

Little Rock, Ark.; San Francisco, Calif.; Denver, Colo.; Meriden, Conn.; Wash- 
ington, D. C.; Jacksonville, Fla.; Savannah, Ga.; Godding, Idaho; Chicago, 111.; 
Indianapolis, Ind.; Sioux City, Iowa; Topeka, Kans.; Covington, ‘ Ky.; New 
Orleans, La.; Portland, Me.; Baltimore, Md.; Boston, Moss.; Coldwater, Mich.; 
St. Paul, Minn.; Trenton, Mo.; Helena, Mont.; Omaha, Ncbr.; Reno, Nev.; 
Concord, N. II.; Trenton, N. J.; Albuquerque, N. Mex.; New York, N. Y.; 
Elizabeth City, N. C.; Fargo, N. Dak.; Toledo, Ohio; Oklahoma City, Okla.; 
Portland, Orcg.; Philadelphia, Pa.; Chestfcr, S. C.; Sioux Falls, S. Dak.; Nashvilh\ 
Tenn.; “Houston, Tex.; Ogden, Utah; Burlington, Vt.; Richmond, Va.; Spokane] 
Wash.; Fairmont, W. Va.; Milwaukee, Wis.; Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Lions International, 332 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111., represents 
local Lions clubs throughout the Unitod States. Many of these local clubs 
lend money to local men and women for the purpose of a college education. 

Masonic Funds — See Knights Templar Educational Foundation. 

Parent -teacher associations — State Congress of Parent Teachers (address president 
through the local school) db in Knoxville, Tenn., Denver, Colo., Oakland, CaUf., 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak., Oneida, N. Y., Springfield, Mo., etc:, maintain funds for 
worthy Btudents. 

Rotary International, 211 West Wackcr Drive, Chicago. 111., reports that about 
half of the local clubs in cities of the United States have student loan funds. 
Booklet on Student Loan Funds is published. 

Strong The Ilenry Strong Educational Foundation Loan, administered by the 
Northern Trust Co., 50 South La Salle Street, Chicago, 111., was established in 
1911. Men and women, preferably juniors and seniors under 25 years of age 
who are worthy and in need of assistance, ore eligible. By the will of Henry 
Strong, “the fund may not be used for so-called classical education, but for practi- 
cal. literary, Mientific, mechanical, or business education in western or southern 
State univeimics, colleges, or schools where the charge for tuition iB less than in 
eastern colleges.” At the close of the last fiscal year. *131,760 In loans was 
outstanding; $35,000 was loaned last year to 100 students in amounts of about 
$200 at 4 per cent interest. Notes are made payable five years after date, with 
interest at 4 per cent four years from date of note. 

Poling Men’s Christian Association. — Many local branches of the Young Men’s 
Christian Association ^end money to local young men. Inquire of the president * 
or secretary of the lotal Young Men’s Christian Association or 347 Madison 
Avenue, New York City. 

FOR WOMEN 

American Association of University Women national headquarters, 1634 Eye 
Street NW„ Washington, D. C., reports that 80 of the 460 local branches maintain 
funds totaling *50,000 to be lent to worthy local girls. 

Business and Professional Women's Clubs, National Federation, 1819 Broadway, 
New York City, report that many local clubs maintain loan funds ior women. 
Information as to local addresses may be obtained from the National Federation. 


o 

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16 


belf-help for college students 


Daughters of the American Revolution, national chairman, Mrs. Eli Dixon, Rose- 
ville, III., rcjxjrt that in 26 States loans were made to 280 women last year. 

Each State lias absolute management of its fund. ....... 

International Student Committee (Young Women’s Christian Association)^ 600 
Lexington Avenue, New York City, lent $1,915 to foreign women in the Unite;} 

States last year. tJ n 

National Association Scholarship Fund for colored women, care of 11 all. e Q 

Brown. Wilberforce, Ohio, «fll la; available in 1929. The goal is $50,000, of 

which $13,000 has been reached. , ... . . T . IM 

Panhcllcnic —National Panhellenic Congress, care of Miss Louise Leonard, 150 
Claremont Avenue, New York City, administers certain sorority funds for 

o. Sisterhood. — Supreme* Chapter of P. E. 0., Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, lends 
to (drls over 18 years of age who are graduates of high school, locally recommended, 
indorsed bv a P. E. O. chapter, and having a health certificate. There are more 
applicants than funds, hut 460 girls borrowed $166,794 last year and $418,145 a 

outstanding in loans. , . . , 

Stale Federations of Women's Clubs in 28 States provide student loan funds 
which total $292,033. Loans are made preferably to junior and senior college 
Kiris who are residents of the State in which /he loans are available, and sometimes 
to Kiris who are freshmen or sophomores in college. Interest at. 6 per rent w 
clmrgcd beginning one year after leaving school. Application for loans should 
be addressed to the loan scholarship fund committee in each State Funds of 
JIO OCX) or more are provided in Idaho, Kmisius, Missouri, New amps tre, 
Nevada, Oregon, Ohio, North Carolina, West Virginia, Iowa and Wisconsin. 
Lesser amounts are provided in Arkansas, Colorado, North Dakota, Indians, 
Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota. Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma Texas, 
South Carolina, Delaware, Tennessee, Washington, Wyoming, and Vermont 
Additional information may be obtained from the headquarters of the Genera 
Federation of Women’s Clubs, located at 1734 N Street NW.. Washington, D. C. 

denominational loan funds 

B APTIflT 

New York .— Lake Avenue Baptist Church, Rochester, N. Y., loaned $600 last 
year to members of local church who are self-help students planning religious 

work* , t> 

Massachusetts. — N orthem Baptist Education Society, Ford Building, Boston, 

Mass., loaned $9,000 last year. * . _ ... A . . mnk „ 

1 Ohio. — Baptist Education Society, Denison University, Granville, Ohio, mats* 

grants to students preparing for the Christian ministry. 

Pennsylvania.— Baptist General Convention Education Board, 1701 Chestn 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa., aids students preparing for special Christian servi 

Catholic 

Connecticut Knights of Columbus, 46 Wall Street. New Raven, administer, 
scholarships to students prepared to attend a Catholic college in th 
States. ^ 

Celhistlan Church 

New York. — The Francis Asbury Palmer Fund, 92 William Street, New York 
City, loaned $1,250 to students identified with the Christian Church last year. 

CONORIOATIONAL 

Massachusetts. — Congregational Education Society, 14 Beacon Street, Boston,. 
Mass., loaned $7, €146 to juniors, seniors, and graduates last year. 


GOINb TO COLLEGE 


V 


o 

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> 


17 


Emucopal * 

New York . — Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, Protestant Episcopal 
Church, 281 Fourth Avenue, New York City, lends to self-help Episcopalian 
students. 

Jewish 

California . — League for the Assistance of Jewish Students, Federation of Jew- 
ish Welfare Organizations, 402 Lincoln Building, Los Angeles, Calif., lends to 
Jewish students in southern California. 

Martin A. Meyer Memorial Fund, Congregation Ernami-EI, San Francisco, 
Calif., makes loans to Jewish students in the University of California. 

Massachusetts.— Women's Scholarship Association, care of Mrs. Maurice 
Sapors, 113 Devon Street, Roxbury, Mass., lent $600 last year ftUewish women 
students. * 

New York . — The Jewish Agricultural Society (Ine.), 301 East Fourteenth 
Street, New ^ ork City, administered fiver loans last year to Jewish students in 
agriculture. 

North Carolina.— Association of Jewish Women, care of Mrs. J. W. Cone, 
Greensboro, N. G., lent $1,445 last year to Jewish self-help students. 

Pennsylvania . — Irene Kaufmann Settlement, 1H35 Center Avenue, Pittsburgh, 

Pa., maintains a fund for Jewish students in Pittsburgh. 

Pennsylvania . — National Council of Jewish Women, 1514 Denniston Avenue, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., administers loan funds for Jewish women. 


Lutheran 


Minnesota . — Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, 425 South Fourth Street, 
Minneapolis, Minn., lent $6,57t) last year to students in Luther Theological 
Seminary’. 

New Yorkr — United Lutheran Church Board of location 39 East Thirty- 
fifth Street, New York City, maintains funds $pr sophomores, juniors, or seniors. 

^Pennsylvania. '—Permanent Ministerial Educational Fund of the Board of 
Education of United Lutheran Church of America, 212 Evangelical Building, 
Harrisburg, Pa., administers two funds, (1) scholarship, (2) loan fund for women. 

Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsylvania, Thirteenth and Spruce 
Streets, Philadelphia, Pa., lends to students of the ministry. 

United Lutheran Church (Women’s Missionary Society), 717 Muhlenberg * 
Building, 1228 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa., lends to missionary students. 

4 

Methodist 1 


Illinois , — Methodist Episcopal Church Student Loan Fund, 740 Rush Street, 
Chicago, 111., maintains a large fund for needy and responsible students. The 
total amount of loans outstanding last year was 82,276,407; about 2,700 loans of 
$100 to $250 are made annually at 5 per cent interest. Repayment Degins July 1 
next succeeding date of leaving school. Those eligible must bIiow memberihip* 
in Methodist Episcopal Church for at least one year; Christian character; satis- 
factory scholarship, promise of usefulness to church and society; financial need 
and responsibility. Borrower must also be dependent in part or in whole on his 
own efforts. 


Massachusetts — New England Education Society, 681 Boylston Street, Boston, 
Mass., makes loans to ministerial students; $1,700 last year. 

Pennsylvania. — Board of Christian Education, Methodist Protestant Churchy 
013 West Diamond 8treet, Pittsburgh, Pa., administered $26,500 last year to 
ministerial students, and made 18 loans to nonministerial Methodist students. 

Tennessee. — Board of Education, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 810 
Broadway, Nashville, Tenn., made 133 loans to students in Methodist colleges. 




18 


BELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

0 

Peuittekun 

Illinois. — United Presbyterian Church of North America, 1 180 East Sixty-third 
8treet, Chicago. 111., administers loans to students in Presbyterian colleges. 

Kentucky. — Executive Committee, Christian Education and Ministerial Relief 
of the Presbyterian Church in United States, 410 Urban Building, Louisville, 
Ky., lends $39,330 to 350 Presbyterian students in Presbyterian colleges annually. 

Pennsylvania. — Board of Christian Education of the Presbyterian Church, 
Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pa., lends $39,715 annually to 290 Presby- 
terian students in colleges affiliated with the Presbyterian church. 

RKfOBMED Church 

New York. — Board of Education, Reformed Church of America, 25 East 
Twenty-second Street, New York City, maintains a student’s emergency/und. 

Unitarian 

Colorado— Caroline Utter Memorial Fund, Scholarship Committee Unitarian 
Church, Denver, Colo., administers a student loan fund. 

United Brethren 

Ohio, — Executive Committee, Board of Education, United Brethren in Christ, 
1208 United Brethren Building, Dayton, Ohio, makes loans to 50 ministerial 
students annually. 

FUNDS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES 

Armenian Educational Foundation, 331 Fourth Avenue, l^w \ork City, estab- 
lished a fund of $250,000 in 1924 for Armenian students who have completed the 
freshman year in a technical or professional school. 

Banking and Economics. — American Bankers Association, 110 East Forty- 
second Street, New York City, established a fund of $500,000 in 1925 for jupiora 
or seniors in 71 affiliated colleges in 34 States to study banking and economics. 

Belgian. — Commission for Relief in Belgiurp, Educational Foundation (Inc.), 
42 Broadway, New York City, maintains a fund for Belgian students in the 
United States. 

Confederate. — United Daughters of the Confederacy, care of Mrs. R. D: Wright, 
Newberry, S. C., maintains a fund for lineal descendants of Confederate veterans. 

Curtis freshmen— The Curtis Publishing Co., Independence Square, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., established a fund of $250,000 in 1925 for students who have satisfac- 
torily completed the practical junior business training course with the company. 

Mechanical engineering . — American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 29 West 
Thirty-ninth Street, New York City, maintains a fund for student members of 
the American Society of Mechauical Engineere. • 

New England parentage . — Isaac Harris Cary Educational Fund, Lexington, 
Mass., is used for worthy students whose parents were born in New England. 

Russian Student Fund (Inc.), 347 Madison Avenue, New York City, for Rus- 
sian students in the United States totals over $360,000, and is lent to qualified 
high-school graduates. 

Veterinary . — The Woman’s Auxiliary to the American Veterinary Medical As- 
■ooiation, at College 8tation, Tex., administers a fund for seniors in recognixed 
veterinary colleges. The total amount outstanding last year was $750. 

Young Women's Christian Association Worker.— The Young Women's Christian 
Association, National School, 135 East Fifty-seoond 8treet, New' York City, 
maintains a fund for women who aim to enter Young Women a Christian 
Association work, 



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' GOING TO COLLEGE 


19 


LOCAL LOAN 7UND8 BT BTATEB 

A rkansat .— Arkansas Student Loan Fund Association, 331 Home Insurance 
Budding, Little Rock, established in 1928 a fund of 110,000 for juniors and 
seniors in 4-year colleges and sophomores in 2-year colleges who are residents of 
Arkansas. 

Eastern Star Educational Loan Fund of the Grand Chapter of Arkansas 
0. E. S., care of Mae Fentress, 23 North Eighth Street, Fort Smith, lends to 
sens and daughters of Masons and Eastern Stars affiliated in Arkansas to secure 
an education in any college in Arkansas — especially juniors and seniors. A 
frcshnmn may borrow 1100. An average of seven 1250-loans are made per year 
California. Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society, Homewood 
Terrace, San Francisco, in 1915 established a college education revolving fund 
for any ward or former ward of the society to receive college training. 

Pasadena High School and Junior College Scholarship Fund (Inc.), is ad- 
ministered by the board of directors, Pasadena Junior College, Pasadena ’ Grad- 
uates of .Pasadena High School or Pasadena Junior College with recommended 
grades and maintaining an average of C are eligible. Forty-one thousand one 
hundred and thirty-seven dollars is outstanding and about 12 loans are fnade 
per year. 

Santa Barbara Educational Loan Fund, 601 State Street, Santa Barbara 
lends 13,000 to $4,000 annually to residents of the city attending college. 

Colorado. AJtrusa Club, 414 Fourteenth Street, Denver, established a fund in 

1925 for a superior woman in Colorado only. Two 1300-loans were made last 
year. 

* • f 

Woman’s Bureau, Chamber of Commerce, Denver, has limited funds for girl 
graduates of high school for business training. 

Connecticut. Hartford Yale Alumni Association, 750 Main Street, Hartford 
lends to ) ale men who arc residents of Hartford. About $3,000 is lent annually 
at 4 per cent. 

Florida. Florida Education Loan Corporation, sponsored by the Rotary clubs 
of the State of Florida, University of Florida, Gainesville, has $26,024 outstand- 
ing loans. Abou* 28 loans are made per year to needy students locally approved. 

Georgia. Alice Walker Shinholscr Memorial Loan Fund, Macon, serves 
juniors or seniors in Georgia State College for Women, Wesleyan College" and 
Mercer University. ’ 

Frances Clementine Tucker Fund, Trustees 203-204 American Savings Bank 
Building, 140 Peachtree Street, Atlanta, was established in 1917 with $50,000; 

15 loans were made last year at 4 per cent to worthy girls, 16 years of age, to 
attend a Georgia college. 

George M. Brown Funds, Georgia Savings Bank & Trust Co., Atlanta, serve. 
Georgia students at Vassar, Georgia State College for Women, and University 
“ Georgia. The fund for University of Georgia amounts to 1279,84a 
Georgia Bankers Association lends to members of the boys’ and girls’ clubs 
»ho my attend the State College of Agriculture at Athena 
Georgia Railway & Power Co. made 10 loans of *150 each for freshmen in the 
College of Agriculture. (MeD.) 

Rotary Educational Foundation established a loan fund for the benefit of 25 
neshmeu in the College of Agriculture. (Men.) 

8outhem Railway Co. established the William Wilson Findley fund of $1,000 
in the State College of Agriculture to be lent to students residing along the lines 
of that railway system, (Men.) f 


o 

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GOING TO COLLEGE 


21 


Student Loan Fund, Board of Education, Battle Creelc^ ia restricted to grad- 
uates of Battle Creek High School with one semester's college credits Five 
loans are made annually and $2,355 is now outstanding. 

Civic League Educational Loan Fund, Bay City, is used to make loans to 
rtudentB approved by the fcomraittee. 

Detrmt Htgh Schooi and College Scholarship Association, Detroit Board 
of Ed, .cat. on, 1354 Broadway, Detroit, lends to any graduate or pupil of a 
Detrot high school or college for the purpose of continuing in high school or 
college; 69 loans were made last year to the extent of $17,602 at 4 per cent 
The Rotary Club of Pontiac, Mich., maintains a. loan fund for students; 
$950 is now outstanding and about four loans are made per year. 

Mimsttopi .— Feild Cooperative Association (Inc.), 406 Lamar Building 
J acks° n , administers a loan fund of $1,000,000 (established in 1925) for resident 
o Mississippi in Mississippi colleges. About 500 loans of $200 are made annually 
at 6 per cent beginning three months after leaving college 
Montana .—. Montana Bankers’ Association Student Loan Fund of the University 

° , ^ “I Ca P‘ tal I Station, Helena, is lent to juniors and seniors in the university; 

$3,150 was borrowed last year by 33 students. 

Aw //ampsAire.— Dartmouth Educational Association, 729 Atlantic National 
Bank Building, Boston, Mass., administers a fund, $28,768 of which is now 
outstanding, to sophomores, juniors, and seniors at Dartmouth College, Hanover, 

MemoriaI Foundation (Inc.), 2 Barbour Avenue, 
Passaic established in 1922 a fund of $250,000 for the use of residents of Passaic 

yLI'aftc^ graduatiorf. 6 ^ ^ - 

A ru 1 lor*.— General Electric Co., Education Committee, 1 River Road 
Schenectady, in 1927 established two funds of $25,000 each to assist their 
employees or employees’ sons to go to college. 

Yi 0r r | Car0 i lna - AnRiCr B Duke Memorial One.), 535 Fifth Avenue, New 
.. . Udy administers a student loan fund of $452,000 established in 1925 for 
Budcnts entered for a degree at Duke University, Durham, N. C„ and is avail- 

„ freshmen who have spent at least one full semester in college. Last 
year 96 loans totaling $14,538 were made. 

&d!m 8 M n o ale T FoU , ndation Wachovia Bank A Trust Co., Trustee, Winston- 
m, N C., administers student loan funds which are available to local high- 
Khool students or graduates. B 

0? 0 7 Can ! On Sc ! 10Ur8,lip Foundation, 800 Market Avenue, West, Canton, 
o administers a fund for local residents and graduates of high school. 

Cinri! r °! te R i S f h,nl ) dlapp Fund - Union Trust Co., Fourth and Plum Streets, 
^cinnati, 1B lent to local girls in Hamilton County. It is not strictly a loan 

“ educational fund with return feature. The total amount in *1928 
$500,000 and $J2,156 was lent last year. * 

,Jr gW0men ’ fl LeagUC ’ 24 We8t Fourth* Street, Dayton, maintains a fund 

.lo^orthy young women of Dayton for educational purposes. 

LumJ n' gh n? C 1 h 7 1 AIumni Loan Fund . care of J. G. Leach, B. A. Leach 
tv. o u ’ To edo ’ * ‘ 8 maintained for Scott High 8chool graduates 
( «Die School Board of Troy, Ohio, maintains the Heywood memorial fund 
r°y High School graduates to borrow to go to college. 

^°7oo7^ W m WC 7 Z f ™ ndation of the University of Oklahoma was estab- 
MUXIOOO 6 W i*/* Wcnt ‘ of P<™caJ2ty. I" 1927 the fund amounted 
Dleuv? 0 ’?? 0 ' . Worthy 8tud ents who are residents of Oklahoma and have com- 
Pted a least one year^f college work are eligible. Application blanks may be 
from the secretary of the Student Loan Association, Norman, (Ala - 


3 

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22 


SELF-HELP FOB COLLEGE STUDENTS 


Oregon. — Benn Selling Loan Fund, Morrison Street, Portland, Oreg., is main- 
tained for local students acceptable to the donor. 

Rhode Island— Rhode Island Society for the Collegiate Education of Women, 
189 Governor Street, Providence, R. I., lent $1,417 to 12 women students hurt 
year. The capital in 1928 was $5,700. Sophomores, juniors, or seniors an 

eligible. 

Scr-ih Carolina . — South Carolina State Council of Farm Women, in care of 
Mrs. L Smith, Bishopvillc, S. C., makes limited loans to women of South 


W T e ec.— Tennessee Bankers’ Association, 1100 West Main Avenue, Knox- 

ville, administers a fund of $21,450 for University of Tennessee students. About 
48 loans are made annually to students who have been in attendance at least 
one quarter and have made a satisfactory record. 

Virginia. — Virginia State scholarships and loans are available in several 

Virginia colleges. , 

West Virginia . — Foster Foundation, Huntington, W. \a., maintains a student 
loan fund for juniors or seniors who are residents of W est V irginia. 

Scottish Rite Educational Association, Scottish Rite Cathedral, Wheeling, 
W. Va., lends to 10 students annually, any worthy person, but preferably sons 
or daughters of Masons. Twenty-one thousand five hundred and sixty dollars 
is outstanding in loans. 

W yoming— Whitney Benefits (Inc.), Sheridan, Wyo., in 1928 established a 
fund of $850,000 for graduates of high school who arc residents of Sheridan 
County, Wyo., needy, able to partly finance selves, and of good character. Also 
a vocational fund is available for nongraduates of high schools. In 1928, 38 
loans totaling $21,661 were made. The average size of loan is $570 and no 
interest in charged. 


Caro 



Part II. — Self-Help 

9 

Choice of What to Do . * 

No attempt is made here at vocationaltfhusement b^S&NmJ 0 f 
he occupations mentioned are used as a means to an entlTXr 
than as regular employment. The best method of advising the new 
student what kind of employment to seek is to tell what other students 
are actually doing to earn their way through college. This chapter 
outlines someof the jobs which assisted different men and women to 
obtain a higher education last year. The estimates of wages and 
other details which are included, vary in different sections of the coun- 
tiy and in different communities but are given for the benefit of high- 
school graduates w-ho are doubtful about the opportunities for working 
their way through college. For convenience the jobs are grouped 
under several headings with an asterisk (*) to indicate the occupa- 
lions in which women are engaged. 

Trades. Although the large majority of students have no trade 
many mature students report that they are making money at several 
varieties of trades or near-trades. In the building trades a few are 
working as carpenters doing odd jobs, paper haPgers, plasterers, mason’s 
Mpers, and house painters, mostly for citizens in private homes. 

tt i?i ° l ' l J )iece worlc ° r ln somo Cftsps bv the day ranges from $3.50 up 
while others are employed at the regular wage scales. For the student 
art, color, and design, interior decorating* is profi table ;"a knowledge 

1 P T°, ,T Ure ’ f , abriCS ’ W °° ds ’ CO,0r hai ™ny, and balance, are 
^entials of this work. The pay is generally good because only the 

well-to-do employ decorators. Similar to interior decorating ia 
nndow dressing. In stores which do not employ a regular window 
dresser, students are often able to got part-time work of a regular 
nature, and they frequently serve several stores. For expert work the 
pay is excellent. Electricians work in many capacities. To become 

IT* °^ r f or at lp ast four weeks of training is required of a 
^h-school graduate. There is often time to study while on such 
work. The work is m three shifts of eight hotirs each and the two 
JSf operators usually alternate shifts. The wage has been reported 
cents per hour. Many cities require electricians to be registered 
•nlk-T™? h ° U9es or doing electrical repair work although almost 
JL lg b- 9C hool boy knows e nough about electricity to do simple 

Occupation* In which women are employed. ~ “ 


23 


24 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


repairs or to mend appliances. Wiring switches ,* winding electrical 
units,* and working on electric ranges in a manufacturing concern 
paid one girl 37^ cents per hour. Many students with a knowledge 
of radio construct, install, and repair sets, and a few act as radio 

announcers at local stations. ^ t 

Some students with previous experience have done watch repairing* 
at good pay. Those with a knowledge of photography* take pictures 
of the college buildings and groups to sell to the student body, do 
finishing for amateurs, color photographs, and make enlargements. 
The college dark room is usually available for such outside work. A 
Kansas man writes, “It is lucky that I am a shoemaker by trade and 
hold down a job that pays about $12 per week as on this my brother 
and myself are able to go nine months to school. ” Barbering requires 
little time to learn, can be done in spare time and is fairly profitable 
when done either in local shops or independently in the college rooms. 
With the present vogue for bobbed hair, beauty shops are furnishings 
means for college girls to earn money by cutting hair * bobbing* 
shampooing* manicuring.* The work is easy to learn, the expense 
small, and the duties can be performed in spare time on the campus 
or in the local beauty shops. Some students work independently 
at cut rates using professional cards for advertisirig among the women 
students. Enough money to pay for board and room has been earned 
by college girls at this work. 

Self-supporting students who know how to do dressmaking* make 
their own clothes and sew for other students, but the pay is small. 
Others work at millinery* either independently or in the shops, 

' sometimes filling in the dull season by making silk lamp shades * 

• Piece work of this kind pays a fair compensation. 

In the mechanical trades a few st udents are qualified to work part 
time or during summers in engineering departments of supply com- 
panies, or on highways. Fifty dollars per month has been reported 
for such work afternoons and Saturdays. With a knowledge of shop 
practice, working drawings, bench work, drilling, floor work, a few 
find employment as machinists or mechanic’s helpers , but previous 
experience is essential; regular wages are paid for this work. Wood- 
turning mills offer work to a few at wages from $15 per week and up. 
In several industrial cities such as Akron, Detroit, Chicago, etc., 
many students work their way as factory hands.* Rubber factorise 
run on three shifts. The third from 11 p. m. to 7 ft. m. is the most 
popular with students. Regular wages are paid for full-time work. 
Experiment stations offer such technical jobs as testing lubrication 
and fuel oils, treating ore, etc., while practical work of the same 
nature is to be found in manufacturing plants and mines. 


O 

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• Occupation* In which women arc employed. 


SELF-HELP 


25 

Automobile employment. — Certain colleges have prohibited fresh- 
men and sophmores from owning or operating care, but special per- 
mission to do so may be granted to students who use automobiles as 
a means of self-support. Some faculty members doubt the advisa- 
bility of permitting students to act as tori drivers, but with proper 
authority many students earn money either by driving their own 
- taxis or by driving for local companies which pav them about 25 per 
cent of the fares secured. Employment with' private families as 
chauffieurs sometimes provides board and room and in the summer a 
money compensation in addition. Sometimes two or more students 
buy an auto truck for the purpose of running light delivery services for 
merchants or students. By taking turns the truck is kept busy all 
of the time with profits sometimes running as high as $65 per week. 
Garages employ students as auto mechanics on part time and pay 
from 40 cents an hour and up. H 'ashing and greasing cars at a chirge 

of $2 or more per car affords some students substantial incomes. 
Employment as. filling station attendants on part time pays about $25 
per week. Those who are good drivers give driving lessons * at 50 
cents or more per hour. Others are engaged in the varied lines of 
automobile employment such -as selling accessories, parts, cars, as 
well as battlry and tire repairing. « 

Office and clerical work. — College departments, business houses, and 
local merchants offer a variety of Office work for students who are 
seeking part-time employment. Office work,* including shorthand 
and typewriting is easily learned and pays according to the qualifica- 
tions and responsibilities of the clerk. Part-time jobs pay from 30 to 
60 cents an hour and a few 80 cents or more; pay by the month varies 
from $20 to $50 or more. Secretarial work,* stenography ,* stencil 
cutting,* mimeographing ,* addressing envelopes,* billing ,* mailing ,* 
andjWiru 7 * are ordinary jobs in any business house or college office 
which have furnished many students with unlimited opportunities 
to earn money during term time. General office, clerks* and statis- 
ticians* are frequently employed part time or on special jobs. Extra 
post-office clerks are usually employed during holiday and rush periods 
Vm-eermce jobs furais^ steady employment for many students who 
are earning an education. Local libraries erqploy library clerks * at 

to . 40 an hour or *60 up per month on full. time. College 
ibranes employ students as assistants* at prices varying from 25 
cents per hour and up and many report that they have earned from 

to $40 per month at4hese jobs. A few earn their way by issuing 
npphes* in dining rooms, laboratories, and colloge departments, 
in aeity Young Men's Christian Association a night desk clerk waa paid 

per month^with room and ample time to study on the job. An 
Oregon man was night clerk tor the Western Union 24 hours per week 


# 0pcupttloiM |q which women ere employed. 



26 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE 8TUDENT8 



3 

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at $30 per month. A Tulane man worked as night dispatcher for & 
motor league dispatching service trucks, etc., at $10 per week. 

Telephone operator * is an excellent job for many students. An 
Akron student was switchboard operator for a rubber company on 
the night shift from 5 to 12 p. m. at 50 cents an hour with time to 
study on the job. A Detroit man earned $90 per month at this work 
during term time, and $130 during the summer. Girls often work in 
offices of professional men answering the telephone * and doorbell. A 
Wellesley girl earned 20 cents an hour by this work. Hundreds of 
students find employment at meal times as cashiers* in cafeterias or 
restaurants, receiving as compensation board, and sometimes more. 
Theaters and movies also employ students for this work on part time. 
Work as timekeeper for laborers, millhands, and clerks, is eften 
available; one man reports 60 cents per hour as his wage. Many law 
students find part-time legal work* in the local lawyers’ offices where 
the small pay is supplemented by the practical experience obtained. 
A few are employed as injormatxon clerks* in various organizations, 
including women’s clubs, at $60 per month and up. Insurance 
companies employ men as insurance investigators to investigate claims; 
the pay is liberal. Banks employ students in spare time and on 
Saturdays as 'hank runners. * Messengers and pages are employed by 
legislative bodies as well as business offices and express companies. 
A page in the United States House of Representatives earned $3.50 
per day; others earn as much as 65 cents an hour. General office 
and clerical work frequently pays the entire expenses of a student 
who must work his way through college. 

Sales and rentals— Selling ,* especially in summer, is in general the 
most profitable work for t,he self-supporting student. With little 
experience, a large amount of self-confidence, and a strong determi- 
nation students make alluring profits and gain a worth-while experi- 
ence at specialty selling. Much of this work is house to house can- 
vassing and the salo of books, hardware, magazines, maps, wood, coal, 
candy, calling cards, chautauqua desks, nursery stock, silk hosiery, 
silk underwear, floor oil and w r ax, jewelry, greeting cards, maple 
sirup, self-heating flatirons, and aluminum utensils often bring big 
earnings. Although manufacturers and merchants advertise for 
agents* through the student employment bureaus and newspapers, 
comparatively few students accept these opportunities from choice. 
Selling to students on the college campus offers a field which a few 
universities are managing by student agencies* described later in this 
bulletin. Considerable sums have been earned on the campus by con- 
cessions for the sale of food, apples, belts, fobs, pillows, souvenirs, 
banners, engraved cards, novelties, and jewelry Last year 350 
men earned nearly $40,000 through the student agencies; 36 men in 

• Occupations In wb|ch women trt employ**, 



SELF-HELP 


BEI/F-HELP 27 

the student laundiy agency earned $5,693; 53 men in the student 
smt pressing agency earned $9,892; 65 men who played for dances 

L ?’ A sandwich company in Dartmouth College made 
$200 the first year it was established and $1,200 four years later 
Magazine subscriptions are profitable for many and can be obtained 
by mail Student exchanges * provide a means of disposing of arts 
and#rafts work. Insurance* companies make good propositions to 
their salesmen. Sales clerks* find employment in the department 
stores during rush seasons and Saturdays; this work pays $2 per 
day and up.. A large number of self-supporting students find work as 
drug, soda and cigar clerks, as pharmacist, etc., in the local drug 
stores. The pay vanes with the qualifications of the employee. At 

U,n the , COmpensatlon is from 30 4 5 cents per hour, 

h i° 3 ®, h °” rS per ,7 eek - and 16 generally too exacting to be profitable 
while attending college. Other jobs pay from $60 to $175 per month 

Lnd n! imC / ?/ ; ^ eW fiDd e ^P lo yment in the local market* 

tending vegetable stands at $12 per week for 30 or more houre of 

whT P 't T r rding h ° USeS Pay a commis8io “ to the student 
wh ' gets new boarders to eat at the house; this job, known as table 

P 7 9 a / b y°i- 10 * P<?r Cent b ° ard Credit - A few students take 
orders for hemhtchmg, picotmg, * plaiting, * button making, * cleaning, * 

XT etC '’ 7** ° the ? W ° rk ‘ n SUCh shops * RentdLs * are 30 profit- 
bk if properly managed. Renting agent arrangements are made with 

Wh ° , re f typewnte ^» P ianoB ^ ^wing machines, musical 

waterT^' ^ Urminre ‘ Where sieges are locatod near the 
ater, student boatmen rent canoes and boats during their spare time 

« dunog ho,, da,. The work of sales andrentTp^ Z m 

Z! ° T ™ wUe on house to house canvassing 

aerted in the* 8 &S * 20< ! a monlh - In seneral the more energy 
eierted in the selhng game the greater the returns. 

oriinlilT* and decorative hand-made objects* are 

ongmated continually for holiday trade. Both men and girls com- 

ula wLdtT, T ““ d °T n “ Hty by offerin e “>eir prfducte for 

taed nhoftll' , ' T U ! Craf1 ' »N«cts, dyad material, 

lower/etc H h *’ a 'l’ P ' 9 mde CresUonB ' wu >ter bouquets of straw 
"owcre, etc., find a rend, market at regular store prices In the linn 

ta.birrlam'* rr i u°' drOT ™« ’ rith experience have 
Zf *° “ m “"eiderable sums for pictorial iUuatrationa aold to 

T* “"‘Pepe™- These pen and ink miration, • include 

r“T f ’ ha “’ clothm «’ fumitu «, end utensUa advertised in 

tb e l y rt P,POr9 ', T m “ «*"* church and 

ln o.m^l' lnl0 ,r, i ahMcard * aQd P» in department atoms are 
~ ^ Dted OTth lempet* colors, while signs and pictures of a more 
Ownpttlon* * n *Woh w o<a«n ar*#mployed. ~~ . . - 

31596°— 29 3 


O 

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28 


SELF-HELP FOE COLLEGE STUDENTS 


permanent nature are usually in oils. The compensation for this 
work, which is by the piece, varies with the execution, and the student 
should have his portfolio ready for exhibition when he markets his 
work. Students who do china painting* often organize clubs for the 
sale of their products or paint to order. Painted lamp-shades* in 
parchment and other materials are popular. Sealing-wax craft* is 
easily learned. Evening dresses, shawls, and scarfs are painted in a 
variety of mediums. Greeting cards which are hand-painted bring 
good prices. Much of this work which can be learned in the depart- 
ment stores, brings fair commissions with small outlay. An artist’s 
■model* poses for 15 to 20 minutes with 5-.minute rest periods ; students 
who pose for art classes are paid from 75 cents to $1 per hour. Picture 
framing* is done in the local stores or independently by self-help 
students; the work, which is easy to learn, gives a fair return on a 
small investment Many ex-service men in the hospitals learned to 
make oraft jewelry* with a book of instruction ffom a library, an 
alcohol lamp, blowpipe, pincers, wire and solder, many artistic pieces 
can be made at small outlay and are readily saleable at large profits. 
Students sell their products through gift shops* or student exchanges* 
where their work is left on sale. 

Professional and semi professional, — Theological students are often 
employed ^either to fill in or as regular pastors in the local churches. 
Many schools mako special rates to sons and daughters of ministers, 
and to those who intend to study for the ministry. A few students 
who Jre registered pharmacists with four years experience in drug- 
store’ work find employment in their field. Several are nble to 
arrange exhibits* in museums besides doing other technical work. 
With a knowledge of mechanical drawing some are employed as 
draftsmen, tracers, assistants, or blue printers in architects offices. 
Semiprofessional work is well paid with compensation ranging 
from 75 cents per hour and up, according to the work. 

Instructors and assistants. — Some students are qualified to teach in 
the local schools either as regular or substitute teachers,* Sometimes 
this work is done in term' time and sometimes alternated with college 
courses. Tutoring* is agreeable work with compensation which varies 
with the Ability of 'tty tutor from 50 ce >ts to 13 per hour. Many 
students are engaged in this work and find it profitable and desirable. 
Evening-school teachers* employed, for two or three hours several 
evenings per week are often students supplementing their income by 
teaching in these local schools. The colleges use student instructors 
in certain departments at varying wages. A Tulane man earned $95 
per month. A few find the sale of copies of daily lectures* profitable 
but a knowledge of stenography and typewriting is necessary in order 
to got out the mimeographed sheets. Proctors* preserve order at. 

•Occupation* Id which women lire employed. 


4 


SELF-HELP 


29 

examinations, study halls, and dormitories. The compensation for 
this work is cash by the hour or room rent. Music lessons* for chil- 
dren are popular employment and students aro often employed to 
teach pi&uo, organ, voice, violin, mandolin, and orchestral and hand 
instruments. Bridge lessons,* driving (automobile) lessons * golf 
lessons,* and a variety of other lessons ate frequently taken by the 
citizens of t lie town if proper advertisement is made by the teacher. 
Instruction of these types is fairly well paid and the time and effort 
required are slight and interfere little with regular college classes. 
Colleges employ students in various capacities as assistant* in 
laboratories to supervise certain laboratory work of the science classes: 
in libraries for cataloguing, issuing, and receiving books; to supervise 
music practice, to check athletic and chapel attendance, to assist in 
giving physical examinations, to play the chapel organ for services 
and to ling .the chapel bell calling students to and from classes and 
meetings. Stcrcopticon and movie operators assist during class 
demonstrations and entertainments; college departments employ 
readers to correct papers and examinations; professors use assistants 
for various purposes; experiment stations employ students for tech- 
nical work. In general, the college assistantships pay small wages 
but are desirable because they are on the campus and in close con- 
tact with both faculty and students, whereas town teaching jobs pay 
better but are more exacting in time and effort. Independent tutoring 

pays well for the self-supporting student providing a sufficient number 
of clients can be obtained. 

Buhl i sin ng. Printing and journalism in various forms have been 
profitable to many self-help students. Journalism,* feature writing* 
and reporting* for newspapers is paid for by the column-inch while 
the basis for compensation for magazines is ordinarily by the number 
o words m an article. At some colleges and univereities are press 
dubs whose members are correspondents for the large metropolitan 
newspapers. For part-time work students report that they have 
maic iom $12 to $35 per week; in 192. r > the students in journalism 
at the University of Wisconsin earned more than $2,000 by writing 
special articles for publication, and 51 Harvard men earned nearly 
W.TOO at various kinds of newspaper work. Only upper classmen 
are eligible as editors,* or business managers,* of the college publica- 
tions because considerable time must be devoted to the work • $20 
per week for this work has been reported. Many are employed on 
Par time to prepare advertising* copy for stores, agencies, and news- 
Pat*re, or to sell space in publications or programs. Local merchants 
Pay for space on lai^e desk blotters which are printed and given free 
to the students. The blotter project netted two Yale men $620. 
Jfckiy fees ar e often paid for advertising service. . Print shops offer 

'Occupation* in which women ere employed. 



,30 


EELF-HELP FOE COLLEGE STUDENTS 



\ 


work of proof reading, typesetting, and linotype operation for those 
qualified ; the compensation ranges from 40 cents an hour for ordinary 
work to $1.05 (minimum) per hour for linotype operators. Com* 
panies which publish the city directory * employ students without 
previous experience on work, which can be done in spare time. |£)ne 
Texas student published a faculty and student directory * which netted 
him over $200. 

Sendee . — On occasion students are often appointed by the chief of 
police as special policemen. Advanced Reserve Officer s Training ( orps 
work may be elected by juniors* and seniors on certain conditions. 
The United States Government pays commutation of subsistence at 
30 cents per day as fixed by the Secretary of War, not exceeding two 
years; credit for graduation is also given for these courses in institu- 
tions which maintain Reserve Officer’s Training Corps units. A few 
find employment in summer as forest rangers— & Wyoming student 
worked as forest service lookout at $100 per month, less $20 expenses. 
Jylen are employed as night watchmen in banks and business houses; 
five Columbia students were so employejMuring term time with 
plenty of opportunity to study on thtj/job. An Alabama student 
served as superintendent of inspection with a pipe and fittings company 
at $125 per month. A Kansas man was supervisor of a concrete con- 
struction gang. City gas companies often pay 65 cents per hour for 
students employed as foremen. Gas and electric companies employ 
lamp lighters to light the city streets at rates of about 45 cents 
per lamp per month. Collectors are employed by merchants, pro- 
fessional men, and newspapers to collect bills over certain routes; 
the work done in spare time or evenings has paid $60 or more per 
month for four hours’ daily work. f>istributing circulars* for printing 
houses and merchants is temporary employment; where contracts 
are made with large manufacturers for the distribution of advertising 
matter and samples the work is more profitable. Local conditions 
determine the amount and character of public service as well as the 
compensation. 

Transportation— Railroad agents are employed by the local stations 
during rush periods. In the summer many are employed as extra 
PvRman conductors at $150 per month and sleeping quarters, but the 
practice of employing students in this capacity is being discontinued 

* in favor of more permanent extras. Steamboat companies use stu- 
dents in the summer as pursers to account for tickets, freight, etc.; 
this occupation provides a pleasant and profitable vacation on the , 
water. Some arrange tours and conduct parties during the summer; | 

* lecturers on the sight-seeing busses are frequently college students., i 
Student trucking companies arrange to take care of trunks and 
baggage of the arriving or departing students. Moormen and f** | 


ERLC 


o 


• Occupation* in which women ere employed. 



SELF-HELP 


31 


dvdors on the street cars who are often college men are paid about 
52 cents per hour. Bus drivers for local companies earn about 50 
cents per hour to start. Students in New York, Chicago, and Boston 
find work as guards on the ehrnt^d railroads. Ten Stanford students 
and -0 Columbia students found jobs as traffic, checkers working the 
traffic census. Many other transportation jobs are available for those 
interested m this type of work. (See also Automobiles ) 
Entertainment. In Boston, New York, and the other large cities 
many students find employment in the local theaters as “supers"* 
and actors * as well as scene shifters, ticket takers, and ushers. Ama- 
teur theatricals use students to construct stage settings;* compensation 
vanes with the type of work. Entertainers * who are able to amuse 
an audience by playing musical instruments, singing, or dancing are 
'frequently engaged by clubs, theaters, and private homes at fair 
compensation. Readers*. are employed for entertainments as well as 
by invalids or elderly persons. Students with vocal talent are em- 
ployed as singers* in churches at,*5 per Sunday and up. Management 
of dances is profitable when several students furnish their own 
orchestra and take the receipts. Some hold dancing dosses * for chil- 
dren and adults. Regular dance-hall manager frequently employ 
students to assist in order to attract student patronage. Motion- 
picture jobs are limited; a District of Columbia student earned $22 
per week as operator evenings and Saturdays; others furnish the 
music, but. opportunities varj with the size and character of the towm 
ge orchestras* are in demand for dances, dinners, receptions, and 
entertainments; the compensation for this work is excellent and varies 
from $2 per hour and up for each instrument. Local bands employ 
b udents at regular rates. Good pianists* earn money in theaters 
orchestras, concert work, at dances, and as accompanists. Organists* 
tad positions m college chapels, churches, and movie theaters, and thev 
give lessons. Promoters* manage all kinds of entertainments, car- 
nivals, concerts, and dances; by doing their own advertising, making 
arrangements, and bearing the financial responsibility many have 
made fair success. Student ffuides* are often employed by visitors 
or sig it-seeing companies to show local points of interest, especially 

* " t T 1S - • There ftVe man ^ opportunities to usher* at garfii 
«na theaters; by this means a student earns 40 cents an hour and the 
privilege of free admission. In general, the compensation in the 
above types of work is excellent and the nature of the employment is 
agreeable for the self-supporting student. 

tfecmztion and physical training.— Sports* often furnish a means of 
Wf-heip Students who participate in college sports gain a wide 
acq mtance which frequently leads to money-making opportunities 
^pref erence on desirable job s. Coaching* high-School teams in 

O&upAtloaB in which women are employed. 


3 

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32 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 



football, baseball, track, and athletic events pays -well. Referees and 
'umpires are often college students. Both public and private clubs 
employ college athletes as gymnasium instructors or assistants at 
$1 an hour or more. Girls who aro qualified find employment on 
playgrounds* and health centers* Churches, Young Men’s Christian 
Association, Red Cross, Camp Fire Girls, Boy Scouts, and other 
organizations employ students as leaders * workers* and in other 

opular and profitable for one who 


ib. Some students manage skating 
rinks which are profitable but require strenuous physical work in 
clearing and coating the surface with ice. Other recreational work 
is well paid. Nineteen Harvard men earned $5,000 last year by 
directing and coaching sports. 

Hotel and surfer-resort jobs— Many college students are employed 
by the hotels in different capacities, especially in summer, as bell hope, 
waiters, waitresses * maids* coat-room checkers,* night clerks, room 
clerks, food checkers, entertainers* and orchestra members.* . Although 
manv find the work trying and the hours not suitable for term-time 
employment, others report that the work is agreeable and profitable; 
much depends on the type of hote^^fThe stipulated salary is usually 
very small, sometimes from $5 to $n>er week where tips are depended 
upon, while some report $70 a month and expenses. In summer 
many save over $200 clear from hotel work. 

There are few summer resorts and summer colonies which do not 
have their corps of college students working as entertainers,* cones* 
sion managers, ticket takers* life guards, musicians* garage men, 
porters, truckmen, icemen, camp managers, cooks,* tutors,* chauffeurs, 
etc. Usually there is plenty of time and opportunity for recreation. 
From $150 to $300 and up can be cleared above expenses in a single 
summer. 

For those who are fond of out-of-door life, students find profitable 
summer vacations as counselors for boys’ and girls’ camps,* director* 
of camp dramatics,* vxiitreeses,* chambermaids* bus drivers , instruc- 
tors, assistants, etc. In the national parks, the Department of the 
Interior grants franchises for the operation of the public utilities to 
private individuals or corporations; these employ hundreds of college 
students each year from June to September, as bus drivers, porter*, 
bell boys, chambermaids, waitresses, and the like. The work is so 
popular that mort applications are received than can be accepted. 
The managers of the transportation, hotel, and camp companies st 
the several national parks will undoubtedly furnish informatio* 
desired. by students interested. - _ 



To be the manager of a summer 


* Occupation* In which woman are employed. 


BELF-HELP 


33 

Food — Waiting on table* is perhaps the most popular job of the 
‘^elf-supporting student because it pays well and requires little or no 
experience. Employment in the college commons or fraternities is 
the most desirable, but there are many opportunities in the local 
boarding houses, restaurants, hotels, and tea rooms as well as in private 
families. The usual compensation is board. Restaurants and hotels 
sometimes pay more, while private families give both board and room 
for four hours daily service and sometimes an additional money pay- 
ment. A man or girl who can cook * will find many opportunities in 
■private families, tea rooms, and cafes. One girl received $50 per 
month one summer for eight hours daily service as cook. A few try 
catering* for small dinner parties in private homes. Compensation 
vanes according to the expertness of the service; a cateress received 
*5 per dinner for services. Fraternities and boarding houses appoint 
student managers or stewards * whose duties include the buying 
planning, and serving of the meals. The average college steward 
has had no previous experience, but relies on the cook, servants, and 
6tudent waiters to assist him. His success or failure is due more to the 
care of the tables, cleanliness, service, and order in both kitchen and 
dining room than to the actual cooking for which he is also responsible 
Kemuneration usually amounts to the equivalent of board and room 
Tea room management* or serving is profitable for a few students and 
the compensation vanes with the time required and the responsibility ■ 
m summer, girls have earned board, room, and from $30 per month 
and up in addition to an agreeable vacation. Self-boarding clubs * 
are formed where a few students club together and take turns in 
preparing the meals. Two girls are able to save from $7 to $10 per 
month living m this manner; four Wyoming men lived on $20 to 
*25 per month each. Washing dishes* although not very pleasant 
work, is necessary and will cover board for those willing to do the work ; 
.when electric dishwashers are used the work is considerably lightened’ 
Ihe student employment bureau at Stanford University 'supplies 
many students as cannery workers* in the local canning factories. 

] . 8 * , * nt of limited moans will find kitchen or dining-room jobs 
durable because they satisfy the largest item of college expenses— 
foam— and at the same time provide food with the' certainty and 
Npuanty necessary to a healthy existence. 

Household sennee. College men as well as college girls are employed 
jmvate homes to do general hovaework*— this is the most popular 
T* for girls but those who lack experience or are not physically 
« ng should avoid this occupation as the requirements are too grea£ 
*~ X on , health ftnd scholarship. For four houre daily work students 
y e both board ft nd room; on part time the work payB fr om 25 

* QocupaUooi la which women are employed. • 


34 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENT8 


to 60 cents per hour, averaging about 40 cents. Often those who also 
assist with the children are called mother’s helpers.* Along with the 
housework are such odd jobs* as cleaning, scrubbing, caring for polished 
floors, gardening, repairing, and in general, looking after the upkeep 
of the house and its furnishings. 

Window washing is a profitable venture for self-help students who 
contract with merchants to keep their store and office windows clean 
at a regular monthly rate. Student window-washing associations 
and agencies have been formed, particularly in the western colleges, 
with the more enterprising students managing the work, employing 
others to do the labor. The work has the advantage of being done in 
spare time with an average compensation of about 35 to 40 cents per 
hour, while some charge 15 cents or more by the window according to 
size. 

Tending furnaces, one of the time-tried methods of the self-suppart- 
ing student, is good as long as the winter lasts. Hundreds of studente 
take care of furnace fires in private homes for room rent, or may 
tend several fires in the same neighborhood for as much as $10 per 
month for a single furnace. 

Care and maintenance oj buildings and grounds . — Some colleges 
employ students for janitor service* in the college dormitories, and 
classrooms. Churches and clubs also use student labor in this 
manner and the work pays from 25 cents an hour (in Texas) to 60 
cents an hour (in Illinois), while some are paid by the month — about 
$20. Often citizens of the town employ caretakers* who care for 
the gardens and in general look after the upkeep of the house; for 
four hours of this work a day, the compensation is usually board 
and room, sometimes with an hourly wage for overtime. College 
men are employed on the campus to mow lawns, rake leaves , assist 
with tree surgery, and care for shrubbery at an hourly wage. Others 
are employed in . cemeteries caring for lots and even digging grants, 
at $25 per month/ Prod+s* in college dormitories responsible for 
the order and condition of the halls usually receive free room rent 
for their service. Fraternities* endeavor to assist their own members 
as far as possible by assigning to self-help students such jobs as 
house manager* who is responsible for repairs, bills, and general 
upkeep of the house. The compensation is usually room rent or 
more according to duties performed. Apartment houses employ 
resident managers* to keep the buildings rented, collect rentals, and 
supervise the service; the pay is usually room rent. Jobs as in&peder 
are well paid for the time required ; one student reported $20 per week 
as inspector of concrete construction. Others are employed to , 
inspect buildings, wiring^ jjlumbing, highways, street cars, busses, 


* Occupation* in which women are employed. 


BELT-HELP 


35 


1 

health, etc. Numerous other occupations of care and upkeep may 
be found by proper application for the work. 

Agricultural Pursuits.— Farming is a substantial means by which 
many students earn their way through college; some earn board and 
room during the year and continue during the summer at regular 
wages in addition. The duties cover all phases of farm life, including 
stacking wheat, pitching headed grain to a threshing machine, milking 
thinning and picking fruit, caring for poultry and stock, as well as 
for the dairy products and general work of both large and small 
farms. Wages of $2 to $6 per day are reported. Sugar plantations 
furnish work to a few; a Tulane student earned $125 per month one 
summer in Florida. Agricultural students are offered opportunities 
for part-time employment in the local greenhouses; a Kansas student 
operated an independent greenhouse, raising about 30,000 tomato 
aster, pansy, and cabbage plants, and made a large return. In 1923 
the Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College organized a 
part-time division” of the school of agriculture, through which 
agency over 200 students are earning their entire expenses by per- 
forming work on the campus in horticulture working in greefllbusea 
and trucl+gardens, alternately one month in the field and the- next 
in the classroom. Students report that they have received $22 50 
per month for this work. The Southern States offer opportunities 
work during the cotton season; a Mississippi student went home 
in April assisted with the cotton * crop and returned to college in 
July. A New Mexico student chopped cotton at $1.50 per day 
Students m California frequently arrange their courses to leave free 
e unng the fruit season for such jobs as picking fruit* canning 
pint as well as selling. Private citizens employ students to spade 
up gardens, plant flowers, pull weeds, and other gardening* Wages 
by the hour vary in different parts of the countiy from 30 cents in 
Vermont to 50 cents in the District of Columbia. Orchards offer 
opportunities for spraying trees, pruning, grafting, etc. Agricultural 
s u ents often assist experienced men in tree surgery. Agricultural 
ttjtenmeni stations* offer a variety of technical work of a highly 
specialized nature which is carried on by students and paid for 
according to the nature of the work. Many advantages are offered 

to a “dents m agriculture in the way of minimum fees and liberal 
scholarships, 

services.— Care of children* is one of the favorite jobs of 
toe sol -help student. In the evening when the child is asleep there 
“ ample time for study while on the job. From 25 to 50 cents per 
hour is paid in different localities. Patients and semi-invalids often 
onpoy college students to act as practical nurses* or companion* * 
Ajtadchffe girl received $125 and room and board for two months 



O 

ERIC 


o 

ERLC 


36 


SEIJ'-HELP FOB COLLEGE STUDENTS 


of this service. Medical students frequently find work as masseurs 
or rubbers in the athletic rooms, and sometimes have sufficient exper- 
ience to give treatments to citizens by appointment. Every year 
eeveral strong young men donate their blood in hospitals and receive 
about $25 for each blood transjueion. Suit pressing is profitable for 
many students. Where the work is not managed by the college agency 
system, students have bought a steam-pressing machine, or ebe 
bought out a pressing business including the machine and good will, 
have employed student agents to sell tickets on commission and 
have earned substantial incomes. In Dartmouth a ticket which 
entitles the holder to have one suit, pressed each week during the 
college year, sells for $7.50 and the agent receives 50 cents commission. 
The compensation for this type of work varies from $8 per week and * 
up for three hours daily service. Mending* furnish^ a small intome 
for a few. Laundry* of silk underwear and fine clothing by hand at 
40 cents an hour has been done by a few girls in college. A laurfftiy 
room is always provided in every college house, and a girl can «<T the 
laundry for two with little extra labor. In some colleges shoe shining 
is managed by students who employ labor and sell tickets. Shopping 
for out-of-town customers or for others who desire such service is a 
means of earning at ‘the rate of 50 cents an hour. Many of the 
personal service jobs are temporary in character, but with enough 
of them a student may make a good portion of his college expense* 
Unskilled labor.— Odd jobs * have helped many students through 
college. Freshmen often begin with this work and keep watch for 
more desirable jobs later on in their course. Any able-bodied student 
is able to beat rugs, remove screens, put on double windows, shove 
snow, and perform all sorts of manual labor for citizens of the town. 
This work is paid for by the hour. The rate vanes with the locality 
from 25 to 50 cents an hour with an average of about 35 cents. Soem 
carry the rod and chain for surveyors and find the out-of-door wort 
desirable. An Armour student earned $300 one summer in a lumber 
yard. An ice company employs 10 Park College students each 
summer at $6 per day. A few work on ice wagons at $15 a week. 
Unskilled labor is always necessary and a willing student will have 
little difficulty in finding work if he will accept odd jobs jfoch as are 
offered by the employment bureau. *Sucfi jobs have paid the entire 
four years' expenses of many college students. 

Studefit agencies . — College agencies, which are commercial ven- 
tures often regulated by the faculty or student committees, are U* 
means of financing many students through coUege. Studeni agencies 
are worthy of separate discussion since they are comparatively new 
in most colleges. They owe their existence to the demand of studen 
for services and supplies. In the course of a college year, considered 


Occupation*^ which wouen are employed. 




self-help 



money is exchanged in a college community for clothes and small 
wares. With the approval of the faculty, enterprising students engage 
' campus rooms for the purpose of opening up a college shop. These 
rooms are then equipped with stock and fixtures— sometimes on the 
time-payment plan — and helpers and salesmen are employed to 
build up student patronage on the campus. Well-managed agencies 
yield fair returns on investments, and arc often passed on from year 
to year to other students who buy out the business and good will. 
In some cases they are private ventures, while in others they are 
, cooperative enterprises regulated by committees of the faculty, the 
students, or a combination of both. More than 20 student agencies 
in Princeton University provide an important means of self-support 
for Princeton men; managers are appointed on a basis of work done 
in competition, and the selection is made by a student advisory 
board of five seniors sitting with the director of student employment. 

^ ale 1 nheraity hasiTT'wcll-established system of student agencies 
which is worthy of inktati/m by other institutions. The following 
outline appears in the T afe booklet on Student Self-Support. 

A recent and increasingly important development of the bureau of appoint- 
ments has been the establishment and the close supervision of a number of 
student agencies offering commodities or services in popular demand among the 
student body. The management of these agencies iB naturally awarded to 
upper classmen, but through a “heeling” system students in the lower classes 
have an opportunity to demonstrate their suitability for these important posi- 
tions. A student advisory committee of prominent undergraduates, meeting 
with the director of the bureau of appointments, receives all applications for 
the managership of student agencies. Any student with an original idea for the 
establishment of a new agency or for other means of earning money should 
submit it to the bureau for npprovi 1 and official recognition. The bureau is, of 
course, glad to assist in working out such new ideas and in developing new 
agencies which seem practicable. 

The ^ludent Suit Pressing Co. presses, cleans, and repairs the clothes of its 
many customers, employing self-supporting students as agents (selling tickets 
or yearly contracts on a commission basis), as col Ichors and deliverers of clothes, 
and, so far as possible, in other capacities as well. Its managers, who are all 
upper classmen with full responsibility for the conduct of the company’s affairs, 
are selected on a competitive basis from the student employees and “heelers.” 

The Student Laundry Association, also well established and with a clientele of 
nearly 1,000, collects and delivers student laundry on a regular schedule. 
8tudcnts act as agents, managers, collectors, etc., the organization and system 
of selection of managers being similar to that of thq^uit-pressing company. 

The Flower Agency obtains orders for flowers for promenade and football 
time, and similar festive occasions. 

The Freshman Picture Agency organizes each year the sale of the group pio- 
tures of the incoming freshman class. 

The Commons News Stand Las the privilege in the Yale dining hall for the sale 
of magazines, newspapers, candy, cigarettes, etc., and is a very deslrablo con- 
cession. 

The Student N sum paper Bureau sells and delivers newspapers to the dormitory 
*ooms of its student customers. It uses students both as salesmen and in making 
deliveries each morning. 


38 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


The Student Transfer Agency. As there is, at the opening and close of each 
college year and of the Christmas vacation, a very considerable congestion in the 
matter of baggage handling, the Student Transfer Agency was organized to facili- 
tate the transfer of baggage between students' rooms and the railroad station. 

The Student Travel Bureau secures Pullman and other accommodations for 
students, arranges for special cars or special trains at vacation time, and for the 
week ends of the championship football games, and plans trips for groups of 
students desiring to travel abroad during the summer. It, too, is organized on 
the heeling system, the competitors being paid cither by commissions or by free 
trips with the parties arranged. 

The Student Typewriting Bureau fills numerous demands from the student 
body for stenographic and copying work. It ownB a duplicating machine and 
several typewriters. 

The Student Wood Agency sells firewood and arranges for its delivery to the 
students’ rooms. It employs a number of students as salesmen on commission. 

The Yale Blotter and the Eli Book are delivered free of charge to students in 
the uni^^Ltv. The sale of advertising space results in a substantial profit to 
the 

The Calendar has a wide sale throughout the student body, particularly 
as it makes an attractive Christmas gift. A managerial competition based on 
the number of sales made is held each fall. All students "heeling" for the calen- 
dar managership receive a commission on their sales whether v or not they are suc- 
cessful in winning the competition. 

The University Football Program and the University Baseball Program are the 
official souvenir programs issued under the auspices of the Athletic Association 
and sold atthe important home football games in the fall and the commencement 
baseball game with Harvard in the spring. These privileges, which are perhaps 
the most desirable of all, are awarded under special conditions and in considera- 
tion of special qualifications. A man’s proven ability to secure advertising con- 
tracts and to manage sales is essential in this connection. Upper classmen only 
are eligible for these appointments. 

One of the cardinal principles in connection with the establishment of these or 
other student agencies is that the organizations in question must justify their 
existence by benefiting not only the students employed but also the entire university 
community. In general, this principle hS^brought into effect a scale of price.- 
below those previously charged by nonuniv^Nity organizations, and the student 
agencies have thus proved an effective economic factor tending toward the return 
of student expenses to pre-war levels. 

Although these agencies are a recent development and Borne of them have just 
been established thej nevertheless enabled 236 students to earn nearly $30,000 
in 1923-24, and as they become more firmly established, both the number of 
students employed and the total earnings are expected to increase. 

Cooperative plan of education . — One outgrowth of the part-time 
employment idea is the cooperative plan of education which origt* 
nated in the college of engineering at the University of Cincinnati in 
1905-6, and has been tried in several institutions in the East and 
Middle West. By a definite agreement between the college and cer- 
tain industrial plants and by a careful selection of students, instructor*, 
and employers, the plan has been successfully worked out. Students 
work alternately in college and on a practical job near the college, 
apd usually two students hold the same job alternately, thus giving 


SELF -HELP 


39 


the employer contiguous service. These students are supervised 
and allowed certain college credit for their work; standard wages are 
paid; and they are enabled to observe factory organization^plant 
operations, labor conditions, and various processes in industry. 
Theory in college is thereby coordinated with practice in industry. 
New students, however, seldom begin with practical employment; 
in the second semester they are interviewed, and during the following 
summer or later are assigned to jobs in industry. The time required 
for completion of the course is frequently longer than four years. 
Practically a tenth of all engineering students are enrolled in coopera- 
tive courses. Institutions which have adopted this system include: 

California , College of the Pacific. 

Georgia , Georgia School of Technology. 

Indiana, Evansville College. 

Kentucky, University of Louisville. 

Massachusetts, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Northeastern Uni-' 
versity; Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 

Michigan , Detroit Institute of Technology; University of Detroit. 

Mississippi , Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

North Carolina, University of North Carolina. 

Nnr Jersey, Newark Technical School. 

New York, New York University. 

Ohio, Antioch College; Cleveland Young Men’s Christian Association School 
of Technology; University of Akron; University of Cincinnati. 

Pennsylvania, Carnegie Institute of Technology; Drexel Institute;" University 
of Pittsburgh. 

Tennessee , University of Tennessee. 

Texas, Southern Methodist University. 

IPiscorwin, Marquette University. 

By means of such cooperative plans, which require an extra year’s 
work, .many students are enabled to defray a large part of their ex- 
penses entirely through their own efforts. 

Finding the Job 

“What can you do?” 

This is the first question that a student in search of work will meet. 
In anticipation of this question, it is well to take stock of personal 
abilities in order to make an intelligent reply. If the applicant 
vaguely answers “anything” he is automatically listed in the un- 
skilled class with fewer opportunities for remunerative employment 
than the experienced worker. After deciding"on the kind of work 
that one is able to perform well, the next step is to communicate with 
the student employment bureau in the chosen college. 

Provision is made in most colleges for some sort of a sttident em- 
ployment bureau — tlie Young Men’s Christian Association, Young 
Women’s Christian Association, bureau of appointments, appointment 
office, student-aid committee, employment agencies affiliated with the 


40 


8ELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE 8TUDENT8 


college, or offices of the dean of then, dean of women, registrar, tress- ( 
urer, etc. The purpose of these offices and committees is the same— 1 
to aid students in securing part-time jobs which will enable them to 
remain in college while studying. Some of the bureaus, especially i 
in large cities, hare developed into efficient organizations which 
satisfy the needs of the students by canvassing the city for'oppor- 
tunities, advertising in the local papers, requesting citizens to patronize 
student labor, and enlisting the aid of the alumni. These bureaus dd 
not promise jobs to new students before they arrive on the campus. 
Before any recommendations are made the bureau expects an inter- 
view with the student to determine what time he is free from courses 
and if he is fitted for the job at hand. They cooperate with both ' 
student and faculty and are becoming important factors in assisting 
needy students to remain in college. 

In order to anticipate the demand for work, student employment 
bureaus encourage correspondence before registration. They wish 
to know in advance what students will seek employment and the 
character of work desired in order to locate opportunities before 
college opens. Application blanks for this purpose will be supplied 
upon request. Often the earnestness of a student is gauged by the 
manner in which he fills out the application for work. Students who 
are serious in their quest for employment will take particular care in 
furnishing the bureau with the information asked. • 

Application blanks in different colleges and universities vary in 
length, purpose, and content. They usually contain a list of jobs to 
check — jobs in which the applicant is experienced, and those which 
he is willing to do. They usually ask what work the student is 
prepared to do, what experience he has had, what money he is obliged 
to earn, and other personal data useful to employment officers. The 
following are some of the typical questions which are likely to appear; 
these questions wM selected from several college blanks used by stu- 
dent employment bureaus and other college agencies which cooperate 
with students who need work : 

Age. Height. Weight. 

Ate you proficient in any of the following work? (chock) : t * i 

Stenography, drafting, bookkeeping, waiter, musician, laboratory assistant 
typing, janitor, fireman, hotel clerk, housework, library assistant. 

Do you clafm special expert ness? 

Do you expect to earn any o t your college expenses? Percent? 

Do you expect to earn all of your college expenses? 

What funds have you accumulated yourself? 

Do you receive any support from home? 

What have you done this year to earn anything? 

Have you secured employment for the summer? What? Where? 

What kind of work do you prefer? Experience? ' 

If you prefer selling, what line? 

Do you know of any opportunities for work? 


SELF-HELP 


41 


What kind of work have you been doing? 

Are you willing to do any kind of work and do it cheerfully? 

Are you a Christian? Member of what church? 

What education huve you had? 

Will it be possible for you to get through without help? 

What amount of money can you pay down? 

Which expenses do you hope to meet by outside employment? 

Are you hunting employment yourself or relying on the student employment 
office alone? * 

After filing the application with the employment, bureau, little can be 
done toward definitely securing a job until the student is registered in 
college. Not until he has nrrangod his class schedule will he know what 
hours he will be free f roqj classes and available for work. In arranging 
this class schedule it is better to attend classes in the morning hours, 
leaving the afternoons free for empl^Jment. To make this choice 
possible, many colleges and universities have readjusted their courses, 
and institutions located in large cities. where employment opportuni- 
ties are plentiful, maintain late afternoon classes as well as resident 
evening courses which are fully accredited and available for men 
and women who hold full-time jobs. With such an adjustment of 
schedules, the self-help student is offered educational advantages 
equal to those of students who do not need to work their way. Stu- 
dents, however, who elect courses in medicine, science, engineering 
(not on the cooperative plan), dentistry, and similar professional 
courses which occupy one’s full time, will find little time for employ- 
ment, and need to arrange loans, scholarships, lucrative summer 
employment, and other means of financial assistance for at least the 
first year. When the class schedule is completed the student may 
begin an intensive search for employment. 

Sometimes a well-worded letter, followed up with a personal 
interview, secures a job with a business concern in a college town, but 
it often, takes many such letters to secure a single opportunity. New 
students frequently find their own jobs in this manner without 
depending on the employment bureau and are satisfied with the 
resul ts of their personal applications. 

S®hcn seeking employment in a college community it is a good 
T»ian to arrive on the campus several days in advance of the opening 
of college. During this time a student will become personally 
acquainted with the employment bureau and will be among the first 
in line for work., At the opening of college temporary jobs are 
numerous and necessary to take care of the arriving students. Both 
the college staff and the business people are busy, new jobs are created, 
and the student first on the ground has the advantage. With leads ’ 
furnished by the employment bureau a student may begin an inde- 
pendent search for work. If necessary a college representative will 
be sent to assist him when he locates a likely job. It may take some 


42 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS ™ 

time for the bureau to find an opening, arrange for an interview and 
assign work, but the student who is awake to opportunities, who 
keeps constantly in touch with the student office, and who cooperates 
fully, will eventually find enough work to take care of at least a part 
of his college expenses. 

Personal advertisements in the local papers bnng results to some 
students in small college towns. One man found all the work he 
could do when he advertised to do odd jobs for the people of the town, 
Others by advertising find work by the hour to wash windows, to 
give music, driving, golf, or bridge lessons, or to tutor children. 

Merchants and manufacturers continually advertise for specialty 
salesmen to handle all manner of household utensils and supplies. 
Publishers send out requests for college students to sell magazines 
and books, and considerable amounts may be earned at this work, 

especially during summer vacations. 

Citizens of the college town usually employ student labor in their 
homes and shops. Where the population is small, opportunities are 
limited and work must be found on the campus. It is then that the 
self-help student must depend on his ingenuity and creative ability 
to make opportunities for himself. Originality has often paid the 
entire college expenses of exceptional students who were on tho look- 
out for means to eariynoney in spare time. 

Earning One’s Way Through College 


Zachariah Bridgen (Harvard, 1657) is the first student on record 
in the United States to attempt to earn his way through college. Me 
entered Harvard College at the age of 14, and graduated at 18. 
Charges 'Hgainst him on the steward’s books reveal that his college 
bills included “commones and sizinges” (board together with food 
and drink ordered from the buttery), “tuition,” “study-rente and 
heed” (room and bed), “fyer andcandell” (fire and candles), wood, 
etc.,” and a charge for “bringing corn from Cbarlstown. Credit 
was given him for “silver,” “sugar,” “wheatt,” “Malte, Indian 
(com), “hooge,” and “a bush of parsnapes.” On December 31, 
1654, there was “geuen him by ringinge tho bell and waytinge- 
£l 2s. 6d. ” — the first record of an American student s earning a 
portion of his expenses in college by ringing the college beU and by 
waiting on table in the commons. As a waiter he received 12s. oa. 
per quarter for three successive quarters, after which he was pa* 
“on quarter for a scholarship 18s. 9d. ” and credited “ by his wages 50 

shillinges and a schollership £3 15s. ” _ . , 

Money was scarce and hard to get in colonial tiroes. Wea 
reckoned by the pumber of cattle a man owned, real estate, fami£ 
plate, and other material property or goods which could be taken 
trade in lieu of silver. The total cost of a college education m 1W 



SBU-HELP 


43 


ranged from £30 2s. l^d. to £61 11s. 8%d., or from $100 to $200 
paid in silver and groceries. Doubtless it would have been an 
inspiring sight to hate witnessed the payment of term bills in the 

l\< twin 


Seventy years ago a college student who was reducing living ex- 
penses, boarded himself and mado com his chief article of diet. Of 
• this experience he wrote : 

Corn is a very proper food. The chit, that little oval flection which holds the 
embryo, contains a large amount of azotized matter It will make muscle. 
The body of the kernel contains fat and starch. There you have fibrine, fat. sugar 
or its equivalent stcrcl., in about the right proportions. It is a cheap food! 
A peck of meal, with a little butter and sirup, or milk, will last » fortnight, and it 
costs about 26 cents a peck. I know a student who lived on it a year; i. e. in 
term time, aDd he said that he always gained flesh when he came from home.' I 
know a law student in a city not far off who has made it his principal diet, in all 
its variations, for a longer time, and he is no puny weight. The corndodger is 
supposed to be baked in the ashes; there is hasty pudding and milk; hasty pud- 
ding and molasses; milk porridge with bread crumbed or mummed; also gruel. 
Then there is "whit pot” Indian brown bread, made with meal and graham flour 
or rye and baked in a steamer; and, lastly, griddles of several varieties. 

Such economics in 1929, however, can hardly be recommended. 
Many colorful and romantic tales have been written about the 
student who worked his way through college. The older stories pic- 
tured an emaciated student spending the daylight hours after classes 
doing chores in return for a scant living. In the evening huddled 
close to an air-tight stove in an attic room, he burned the midnight 
oil while he mastered Greek and Latin. In those days, when only the 
well-to-do could afford the expense of a college education, he was 
known as the “poor student.” ' With diligent application to his stud- 
ies perseverance to his tasks at the expense of the social stimulus of 

college life, he graduated with his classmates, bift his life was not an 
envied one. 

Time, however, has changed and improved these conditions; 
midnight oil has long since been replaced by midnight electricity; 
the air-tight stove has become an antique; Greek and Latin are no 
onger required subjects on the college curriculum; higher education 
“ b ® 1 ) Dg ma( k available for those who desire it; and institutions are 
establishing employment bureaus and other agencies within the col- 
lege to lighten the burden of the employed student. In recent years 
the increased costs of living and tuition, which so far have had little 
influence on college enrollments, have been responsible in part for 

greater numbers of students working their way part time through 
college. 

So large a number of men and women are now employed while at- 
tending college, that the effect of s^f-help on the social status of the 
individual is no longer marked. Too many self-suppor 
31696°— 29 4 




44 — 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


are earning their way in college to make employment or leisure « 
basis for social distinctions. In, a few institutions, especially women’s 
colleges, the amount of self-help is limited or only “white-collar" 
jobs are permitted, but colleges for the most part put no ban on honest 
employment, and look upon self-help as a mattor of course. 

The democratic spirit is prevalent on most college campuses. 
Student leaders are chosen because of popularity regardless of finan- 
cial standing or self-supporting activities. Many institutions report 
that some of their most popular students are earning their way. 
College employment. buroaus contribute to this attitude, since they 
are agencies for mutual benefit of the employers and the employed. 
Even those who are not obliged to work feej^.that earning^&oi^way 
wins a certain prestige which can not be ignored in the light o( 
experience. 

Graduating students who have earned a large part of their college 
expenses are shown marked preference by many employers. The 
practical experience which these, students gain by their self-supporting 
activities, along with intellectual training, often proves a valuable 
asset in seeking permanent employment. These siudents are traiiM 
to know somo of the problems of employment at first hand; tt» 
know the value of time and a day’s labor; and they have a high rogara 
for the value of money and its purchasing power in terms of labor. 
Altogether they are better able to compete for empldymont thun their 
inexperienced classmates who have never worked for money. 

A thoughtful student, however, will consider many propositions 
before he decides to enter college on limited funds. Is he sincere in 
his desire for a college education? Has he sufficient high-school 
preparation? Has he dependents who look to him for support? 
Has he funds for at least the first term? Can he avoid a physical 
breakdown by maintaining the proper balance between stydy, work, 
social activities, and rest? Discussing these questions in order: 

The desire for a higher education must arise within the, student 
hirhself ; his success in college will be in proportion only to his interest. 
Sometimes ambitious parents inako great sacrifices to. aid th&ir 6oni 
and daughters to register in cc#cge and later ljnd that their effort® 
were futile; that their children were not interested in study or in 
intellectual attainment. If a student himself feels the urge to go to 
college, anticipates the value of a higher education, and is willingly 
sacrifice immediate business openings for future possibilities, he should 
be shown his opportunities. Those not interested in higher learning 
should not be sent to college, but should be guided by their ambition® ■ 
and plans. 

Sufficient high-school preparation is even more essential for th® 
student of limited means than for the well-to-do, because the forOrtT j 
will find neither time nor money to make up his deficiencies. Entrant# 


self-help 


r 


conditions will be a handicap to his regular college studies. Poor 
preparation for college will prove a drawback when he endeavors to 
maintain a good classroom record and earn his way at' the same time. 
A good foundation for college studies and proper high-school credits 
are credentials by which institutions admit many promising students 
who lack funds to finance their entire way. 

Freedom from dependents at home is necessary when working for a 
college education. Although there are a few exceptional students 
who are supporting a mother or sister while working their way, these 
students. arc regularly employed and are studying in the ll|fc^Kours. 
Wlth n Permanent job, some span, time, and favorable conditfcttWor 
college work, an able student may make a home and attend college 
at the same time; but the inexperienced youth who attempts to earn 
his way and take care of dependents as well will be unable to pay 
costs on an irregular income from odd jobs. 

The amount of money necessary for the first term of college vanes 
with the institution selected. Funds from $150 to $250 are suggested 
by many colleges, while others name amounts as high as $350 which 
are necessary for the ordinary expenses of the first term or first semes- 
ter. Some students reported that they arrived on the college campus 
with “just enough to pay the registration fee" but this procedure is 
50 " mv,se that manv institutions do not allow students to remain 
without resources. If is disastrous for a student to find himself 
overburdened with outside work and owing money by mid-term of 
the freshman year. If he fails in his courses, he will len^e disheartened 
with his experience feeling that college is no place for a man without 
money. The University of California advises that “it is usually so 
dmicult for a stranger to secure remunerative employment from the 
start thnt, m general, no one should come to Berkeley expecting to 
become self-supporting through (he university course without having 
on hand at, the begirthing sufficient funds to cover the expenses of the 
j t scmcster -” A cash reserve will enable the student to follow the 
advice of other self-help students— “Earn no more than is absolutely 
necessary the first year.” The older students are first on the employ- 
ment lists, freshmen jobs are less desirable, and better opportunities 
. 1 arise if the student can afford to wait. Enough cash for the 
Mst semester should enable an ambitious freshman to make a satis- 
•ctory beginning in his studies, to got accustomed to his new environ- 
ment, and to find satisfactory employment later in the year. 

Essential to the good health of the self-supporting student are 
substantial food, proper sleep, freedom from worry, and a goodly 
Jllowance of play along with regular work. Ho must provide for the 
Proper balance between study, work, activities, and rest, as these 
Mors regulate a successful and healthful career. Too much of one 
mine exclusion of another may wreck his whole plan and even break 


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SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


down his health. If he is able to budget his time to maintain the fine 
adjustments of healthful living, he will undoubtedly depart from 
college benefited physically and mentally by his experience in earning 

his way. . • 

Having satisfied himself on these points, the prospective self-help 

student should finally know something of the views of college admin- 
istrators and college students regarding employment during a college 
career. College presidents and administrators differ concerning the 
feasibility of student employment during term time. Some believe 
that self-help is commendable and does not detract from The main 
purpose of the college student, and others feel that by outside employ- 
ment the student is hampered in obtaining the full benefits of a college 
degree. Administrators agree, however, that in the colleges and 
universities a great number of students are succeeding in their 
double task of earning and learning. Some of the statements follow- 
ing show -the trend of their views. 

Statements of College Presidents and Administrators 

A large number of the students of Birmingham-Southern College work their 
way either partly or wholly through college, and we are glad to state thst at 
this time there arc very few who are not satisfactorily placed. They fill all the 
positions in the offices and on the college campv^ that can be filled by students.- 
Guy E. Snavely, President, Birmingham-Southern College {Alabama). 

No properly prepared student who is possessed of good health and who haa do 
dependents need hesitate to undertake a university course because of lack of 
means; for if he is sufficiently in earnest in his desire to “work his way though, 
opportunities will not b^ lacking —A ppointment Secretary, Stanford University 
( California ) . 

Our experience has proven that it is possible for a student to earn his way 
through college and get just as much out of “college life” as the fellow who is 
financially backed .-Edith M. Weir, Appointment Secretary, University 
Southern California. 

The University of Chicago maintains an employment bureau for the service of 
students desiring to meet part or all of the expenses while in college and to assist 
a them in securing permanent positions upon graduation. At the present time w« 
have a committee making a study of the advisability of developing the 
ment service to a greater extent than ever before attempted in Chicago. Tbs 
meed of a highly developed employment service is particularly urgent at our 
university, due to the fact that many students are attracted here on account of 
its location in a large city where employment is readily available. R. J . Dm «**, 
Employment Secretary, University of Chicago (Illinois). 

Whether or not a student should be advised to work her way entirely through 
college depends upon the individual, her initiative, her capabilities, her intellectusl 
ability, anft her physical endurance. For the persistent, efficient girl, it is never 
difficult to find opportunities.— Lucy O'Meara, Director of Appointments, Radcht* 
College (Massachusetts). . V , 

In regard to the scholastic standing of our young men who work, we have no 
figures showing this, but are of the opinion that the work does handicap some d 
them In obtaining gooti grades. However, some of. our self-supporting studen 


SELF-HELP 


47 


do have excellent marks and we consider the training they get in working their 
way through worth something to them, as many business firms asking for grad- 
uates to fill positions, desire those whrf have worked while attending Bchool.— 
/. A. Burnley, Dean of Students , University of Michigan . 

Park College controls the following industries: A farm of 1,200 acres, a modem 
printing plant, a laundry, a canning factory, a carpenter shop, a dairy, a poultry 
farm, gardens, an orchard of 150 acres, h water supply for the college and village 
its own heating plant, and other industries. 

In the work of the industrial plan it is not the purpose of the college to furnish 
vocational training^ This training is simply a by-product. The main purpose 

J 1 ,T St , 8tude " ts of ab,llt - v and Promise to secure an education in a Veil 
standardized, good liberal arts college. Every student admitted into the dor- 
mitones of Park College is assigned some work for 3 hours a day or 21 hours a 
week. This work is regular and is under dependable supervision. 

This industrial plan has been in connection with the college since 1875. 
Through experience it has been found that students of ability are able to do 
hree hours work <of this type daily and yet do most satisfactory academic work, 
^dy students of first-class ability are selected. In the freshman class for 
1926-27 approximately 80 per cent ran^ in the first quarter of their high school 
classes — If . F. Sanders, Dean, Park College (Missouri). ^ 

Syracuse University presents exceptional opportunities to men and women who 
propose to .work their way through college. Both university and city people are 
, g and gIad to turn over “ m,,ch «'<*rk as possible to students, and in a city 

“ 5T “ SyracU8e ' therc are hundrcds of openings. A student who possesses 
good health, who is anxious to work, who is wide-awake and reliable usually 

finds plenty of employment ,-Jlfrs. M. IT Partridge, Dircelor of Appointments 
Syracuse University (New York). ^ 

J} f or a young woraan of 8°° d health and intellectual ability to pay 

it least half of her expenses by the work she can secure during the college year 
ind^the summer vacation.— Frederick Lent, President, Elmira College (N$w 

It has been our experience tjhat the students who find it necessary to earn a 
l*rt of their expenses in the main develop a very high appreciation of the 
•cademic side of coUege, and frequently lose Borne of the value which comes 
Irom extra-curricular activity. The student on our campus who works is not 
anj way looked down upon, but his leisure time is pretty much consumed in 
U«t business of learning .— Irma E. Voigt, Dean of Women, Ohio University. 

Everyone living in the vicinity of the university is conscious ot the large body 
working students, because students are employed in the gas stations, in the 
"<**, on the street cam, on the wharves, in the theaters, in the power stations, . 
■owe public offices, and in connection with practically every industry in the 
y of Seattle.— E. B. Stevens, Registrar, University of Washington. 

« ®f * he v beat students who come to us very largely earned their way 
wough high school and continue largely to earn their way through college A 
wge number of the young men and women with us are employed daily about 
we campus and buddings or at gainful occupations in the city. While the burden 
mire support seems in these days too heavy for a student to carry with fair- 
"" to himself, there can be no question that some responsibility for his own 
•“PPo steadiee-the student and gives him an incentive to make the best use of 
tune. Norman P. Coleman, President, Reed College (Oregon). 

A vivid picture of tho struggles of self-supporting college students 
® presented in letters from these students to the Bureau of E®fcation. 


48 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


These interesting communications written directly and with a serious- 
ness of purpose tell of the advantages and disadvantages of self-help 
from a student point of view. They are written for the purpose of 
advising other students who have never attempted a college educa- 
tion on limited funds. The writers generally favor term-time employ- 
ment if a student is able to pay his expenses for. the first term.in an 
institution. They agree that it is somewhat easier for a college man 
to earn his way than for a 'college women, but also point out that 
th6re are many opportunities for both men and women to earn at least 
a part of their expenses and at the same time enjoy some of the activi- 
ties outside of the classroom. Only a few of the many letters can be 
published here, but the extracts selected at random from several 
States and printed below show' the enterprise, pride, and ability of 
some of the college students who are successfully making their way 
toward an academic degree. 

Letters from College Men Who are Self-Supporting 

Eajinkd 16,000 

I have made during four years college close to $6,000. When it is all over, I 
will say it has boon terribly easy. Of course, there were bumps. There were 
pinches, hard and trying times to try to get my studies in, too, but it was all fun. 

I think I am over the bumps now. When one gets to be a senior he knows the 
ropes pretty well, and things seem to come his way. Perhaps I have painted all 
this too rosy. I don’t mean to. It is a pull, especially in the beginning, ^but I 
want to put across to that young fellow who wants to go to college that “If he 
wants to do it, and he’s determined to do it, he can do it." From Yale University. 

Earned All Expenses 

At present T am not only earning mv tuition at school by acting as assistant to 
an engineering professor, but am also employed on Saturdays at salcswork in t 
large music house of this city (Chicago)'. In this way I am practfcally earning all 
of my expenses for this year at school. I am a fraternity man, which has its 
financial obligations, and am quite active in various school organizations, all of 
which require yearly fees for membership. By arranging a systematic budget. I 
manage to pay off all of these financial responsibilities. I must admit that at do 
time did my work seriSusly interfere with my schooling. 

My average earnings are $4.60 at saleswork and *6 per week at school. Work- 
ing my way through college is no new phase of life, as I worked while. at high 
school. I have always become incensed at tho preachings of professors or teacher* 
who believe "the working student is the poor scholar.’’ I can present a multitude 
of refutations of this idea by selecting among the brilliant students at Armour.- 
From Armour Institute oj Technology. 

Aviraoid $12 fir win 

For the last two years of my 4-year course I have been earning board, room, 
and most of my other expense items with the exception of books, fees, dues, and 

doctor bills v . 

I have averaged throughout the nine months about S12 per week, my besi 
working period coming in the spring, when 1 make up for a slow winter seA*». 
» Except for one semester when I lived with and workod for a private famflj, 


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my work has been entirely with odd jobs, mainly window washing, lawn work, 
waxing of floors, and office cleaning. I obtained aU my work through the Young 
Men’s Christian Association. During the two years’ time I have worked irregu- 
larly for the same people that I started with, thus making my progress much 
easier than it otherwise could have been. 

Odd jobs pay at least 60 cents an hour; the average might be closer to 70 
cents, for my office cleaning amounts to $1 per hour. With the aid of a few 
leads from college friends, all the desired work wanted can be had; that is, if 
the student is not afraid of hard and sometimes dirty work. My work with 
the private family paid the best for the amount of work really done, but I prefer 
hustling about and having as reward my evenings and Sundays free. * * * 

I am doubtful as to the truthfulness of the saying that “the man who works 
hiB way through school gets the most out of it.” Yet again, if the young man 
must work in order to get the higher education his profession demands, tell him 
to come by all means— From Northwestern University ( Illinois ). 

Ariutiid with a Capital of $90 

The first thing 1 would mention is that I have earned every cent which it 
has been my pleasure to spend. I first entered the university in 1920, fresh 
- from a small high school and fired with the ambition to become a journalist. 
My capital, when I arrived in town, amounted to some J90. This lasted just 
about three hours, long enough for me to pay my first semester tuition, and 
room rent for the same period in the university men's dormitory. I went in 
Bearch of work. I had the advantage of having worked in a drug store while 
attending high school, and the dean’s office was very helpful in giving me names 
of several places where work was, or had been, available. At the first call 
though, 1 began to realize the difficulty of my task. The person I called upon.’ 
a druggist, was a kindly man, but told me that I was the eleventh boy he had 
i Burned down that morning. I believe that I called in 50 different places without 
finding work, until finally one proprietor said he would give me a tryout. The 
first lesson I learned was this: The most important first step in working your 
wsv is to get to town early, at least two weeks before registration, in order to 
line up work. * * • 

This year at Iowa has been a very fortunate one for me. My knowledge of 
the soda fountain, together with my responsible age. made it possible for me to 
get a very much better job. * A, * Next year I am going into medicine 
1 have no money, but the years I flfeve put in in this town have taught me that 
nothing is impossible. I know that with the heavy schedule required of “medics, " 

I will have no time to work outside. I have established a reputation for respon- 
dbility, however, by paying off indebtedness promptly, and know that I can 
• borrow the money somewhere to finish my education. 

The working student can not expect to become a social lion on any campus, 
ft is not possible to buy the clothes or anything else necessary for such things 
Sacrifice is necessary, and while he is learning self-reliance and the value of a 
dollar he is giving up the social training which university life offers. On the 
other hand, the boy who works none and attends everything, sacrifices all the 

•easons which “bucking this kind of a game" has to offer.— From Stats University 
q Iowa. 9 

Entered With 1300 8avcd in Vacations 

Mrs. Partridge obtained for me, through her most efficient student employment 
office, a job at a private residence. I help In the kitchen, tend the furnace, gen- 
.JW care for the house, drive the family oar, tend the lawns and flowers, and 
.penonn any other duties, within reason, that I am asked to do. I am required 

k : 


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SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


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A 

to work four hours each day for my room and board and receive 35 cents u 
hour for overtime. I usually cam from $2 to $5 each week in addition to n»y 
room and board through this system of overtime work. 

I came to Syracuse with *300, Which I had saved while working during sum- 
mer vacations. This money served to pay my tuition of $250 and to purchase 
books and necessary equipment for study. I provided myself with clothes 
during the summer, My room and board is cared for as I have explained. I 
send my laundry home to my mother. The extra money I earn serves to pay 
dues to my fraternity and to purchase necessities and to afford pleasures at times. 

1 do not find myself too crowded for time. My classes come from 8 to 11 
o’clock each morning, except Sunday, of couree. I work from that time until 
about 4 o’clock, usually. The time left before 6 I use for athletics. Incidentally 
I made the swimming team and I am now training with the track team. My 
employer excuses me from work on days of competition in these sports. At 6 
each day I report to serve dinner. By 8 o'clock I am through all of my dude* 
and can begin my studying. Eleven is my usual bedtime although I vary the 
time in accordance with the amount of work 1 have to do on my studies. Sundays 
afford me time to make up back work or advance in my studies and also to get 
out for outdoor enjoyment, I find it possible to attend social functions at timet 
without neglecting my studies so much that 1 can not catch up over the neit 
Sunday. 

1 find my work very pleasant and my existence here most enjoyable. At 
times duty affords me opportunity to travel and to see more of this country thsn 
I would see otherwise as on a trip taken in the last week in September when I 
drove my employer and her sister south through New York State into Penn- 
sylvania . — From Syracuse University. 

noRRoWKD 1500 and Earned Remainder 


I am a senior student in the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Teiai, 
and will rectee the bachelor of science degree in June in agricultural administra- 
tion. It ha^>een my privilege, } consider it so, to be immediately responsible 
for all of my college expenses. A loan was extended me by a Rotary Cfub in 
Texas. On ray entering college in the fall of 1922 as ^a freshman student, 1 
worked during my spare hours for the department of buildings and college 
utilities for which I received 25 cents per hour. On entering as a sophomore 1 
began work as a student waiter; we were paid $20 per month for work which 
required not over 45 minutes of our time each day at mealtime. At the begin* 
ning of my junior year I began work as a student assistant in the department of 
agricultural economics. The work consisted of checking class-written work 
and clerical work in the office, for which I received 35 cents per hour. Later 1 
was transferred to the registrar's office where I have continued to work during 
my senior year as Student assistant in statistical work, for which I receive $30 
per month, I have thus been enabled to earn all my college expenses with the 
exception of $500 which has been advanced me by the Rotary Club. They wifl 
continue to carry this loan until after my graduation in June, at which time tto 
loan will be put on the annuity amortisation plan . — From Agricultural 
Mechanical College of Texae . 

A Window-Clianino Venture 

During my college career which will have taken me five years, I will haw 
earned 240 credit-hours w here 193 are required. I have earned my way absolutely 
by my own efforts. i 

I arrived at the University of Wyoming in the fall of 1921 with $2.86 in cmd 
and a high-school scholarship which saved me about $25 pqf year in feoa. 





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• knew but one fellow in the whole town, an older student from my home town, 
and from him borrowed $5 for reparation. I had instructions from home to 
return if I did not get a job soon. I had very little difficulty in obtaining a job 
to work for my room by tending a furnace, To find a job for board and expenses 
wu another matter. I applied for work at every store and establishment in 
town and at sqjne residence houses. It was two weeks before I finally landed a 
job in a downtown restaurant. * * * I worked during the Christmas 

holidays on the ice harvest for $3 per day and managed to save about $30 which 
luted me until I landed another restaurant job, this time in a high-class caf6 
My job was peeling vegetables and making salads. My hours were 6 to 8 a. m. 
and 6 to 8 p. m. and all day Saturday and Sunday. I received $10 per week and 
board. * * * I decided to borrow money to go through the last year with- 

out working, and received $75 from the student loan fund and $100 from the 
Masonic loan fund with the expectation of borrowing more later in the year. 

Finding time heavy on my hands and the money going faster than I expected, 

1 began to work with a partner. Our next venture was a window-cleaning 
company. We made contracts with merchants to keep their windows clean at 
so much a month. The business proved a success, but our partnership did not, 
and it ended when I bought out his interest. This business pays me about 
1120 per month over expenses which include the pay of a student who helps me. 
The time required is not very great and the hours are arranged, at my own con- 
venience. My only regret is that I did not start it when a freshman. 

I believe my college career to be successful in other ways. I was elected to 
membership in my junior year to an honorary engineering fraternity which includes 
only members in high scholastic standing. I have completed the advanced 
wuree in Reserve Officers’ Training Corps and received a commission of second 
lieutenant in the Officers Reserve Corps and also earned a varsity letter in 
wrestling. — From University of Wyoming. 


Wonts ks Reporter 

1 am earning more than my running expenses as a reporter of college news for 
he local evening newspaper. I am a sophomore in journalism at the Kansas 
tate Agricultural College, have been with the same paper since entering college 
Mm export to continue at IcaAt until I graduate from college. 

From two to five hours a ’day, between classes, are devoted to the work, which 
pays from $1 5 to $20 a week. I work by space; that is, I get 60 cents a foot for all 
copy furnished the newspaper. This serves to pay not only mv own expenses 
but also must cover much of the living expenses of my widowed mother and 

* u Wh ° m 1 UVC Whil * attendin 8 college- I carry 15 hours of college 

ork (18 hours being a normal load), and am averaging better than normal in 
®y grades. 

The fact that I am crippled, my right arm having been made virtually useless 
« a result of an attack of infantile paralysis a few years ago, does not hinder 
me to any appreciable degree In my work on the newspaper or as a student 
Make little part in social activities, but am a member of the Young Mena* 
mn Association, one of the college literary societies, and a member of the 

»cai chapter of the professional journalism fraternity .— From Kansas State 
ijnchllural QoUege. 

STUDinta Work roa Hm 

Icame to J'ftirmooBt College in the fall of 1924, green, and right out of high 
wdow. I was given a job waiting on tables in the girls’ dormitory which paid 

I fa^ a . rd ’i ! bU . t thl * W “ DOt enough for me to g° to school on, so In my odd houra 
wed to find some way to make some money. I hit on a plan of making the 




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SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


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other boys work for me, bo I had 2.000 handbills printed announcing the estab- 
lishment of the odd job agency: “Let us do that odd job” and enumerating tbs 
different work we did. I took these bills and put them in the mail boxes of tbs 
better residence district of the town. I got results immediately and tried to take 
care of all the work, but finally had to hire one of the. other boys. I paid him 
more per hour than the college did and then I would charge the patron so much 
more per hour. Finally by the last of October I had seven boys working for me. 
I made from $15 to $25 per week from this. Then again in the spring 1 carried 
this odd job agency on again. My first year I cleared $630 from this. The next 
fall I went into it more extensively, and I cleared approximately $700 by spring, 
and at present 1 have 1 1 boys working for me every day and have jobs booked 
for a week ahead. When my supply of jobs runs out 1 go out canvassing for 
some. Window washing is our long suit. We have four of the main buoinea 
buildings in town to wash the windows on every six weeks. Each one of these 
jobs clears nearly $75 a piece. Wpay my helpers by the hour while I charge by 
the window. As to the time I put in, I usually put about five hours a day at 
mv work and the rest for my studies. 1 have more of a bank account now than 
before I started college and have paid my own way entirely for the last two yean 
and expect to for the next two. — From Fairmount College (Municipal UmvertUy 

of Wichita, Kans.), 

Selected Cooperative Plan or Education 


Four years ago I was a mechanic— armature winder. I had a job that would 
have lasted me probably for life. My pay was wcU sufficient for me to live com- 
fortably and even to save some money. The work was not hard and my fc ow 
workers and superiors were congenial. Yet I was not satisfied. So nna y 
resolved to go to coUege, and in 1922 entered the engineering course of Dreid 
Institute. I selected this college because of its cooperative plan that would make 
it possible for me to earn my way through. This course at the time consisted of 
four years (it has since been changed to five years) two full scholastic years (fresh- 
man and senior) and two 6-months scholastic years. The rest of the time wm 
spent in industry. I made arrangements to go back to my old job during those 

^had $500 when I started, $250 of which went to pay my tuition. With the 
rest of the money and what I made on Saturday ($6.50) 1 pulled through my 
freshman year. After the freshman year there was a vacation of three months 
and then one-half of the class was sent out in industry and the other haU kept 
in school. 1 was of the half that went out in industry so that I really had ax 
months of steady work during which I saved $400. This was ample nione y 
pav my tuition and living during the next three months. From then on, I worked 
at the same job during my industry periods, hut on account of my roster 1 ouo 
it impossible to work during school period. So I did other things, did electing 
repair work in houses, sold radio sets, kept books in a small store, gave French 
lessons, and even sold perfume from door to door. That last job was the wont 

of all of them. * * * . „ nr k 

To conclude, I may say that the last four years have meant pretty hard wort, 

but that I have been at least as happy as I would have been at my old job, 

I have secured a position in the research laboratory of an electrical concern, 
that I see my dreams being realized . — From Drexel Institute. 


WoBia Foub Houm a Day 

The University of Missouri is one of the most democratic of schools. jerkin* 
one’s way through school is here considered an honor, A good quality rather 
s degrading necessity. Roughly, nearly a third of the men students work part « 


o 

ERLC 


SELF-HELP 


53 


their way. During my four years in high Bchool in a small town, I had worked 
in several drug stores, clerked in a grocery store, and had done some office work 
I had a typewriter and could do stenographic work after a fashion. That was 
ill the experience I could offer. My prospects were these: It was necessary for 
me to work for all my expenses except those which could be covered by an annual 
loan of $150 or $200 without interest. I came here about three weeks before 
school started and went the round of drug stores, restaurants, confectioneries, 
and also shoe stores. Meantime I went out on temporary jobs secured through 
the university employment bureau. Finally I obtained work in a caf6 and I 
stUI have the same job. (11 a. m. to 1 p. m. and 5 to 7 p. in.) 

I have estimated that the minimum amount of money required to attend 
school here one year is about $650. My work at the caf<5, in addition to some 
typing once in a great while, has paid over $450 of my yearly expense here. 

If a student is a printer, barber, or a good musician, he can always find his work ~ 
waiting for him at a good union salary. Such students are usually independent, 
and I know one who actually saves money while he is in school. Looking across 
the campus I can see two students who have had courses in tree surgery and they 
are employed by the university to keep the campus trees in good shape. One 
udent recently began the sale of home-made horseshoes which met the regular 
tions for standard equipment for the sport of tossing horseshoes, which is 
popular just now. One student pays his spring expenses with a lawm mower. 

I sincerely believe that any student who wants a college education can get it 

Missouri 18 4 8kUled worker or notl nnd 95 P° r ceut are not.— From University 

Has Workid Continuously 

» ^ - 

From the day I entered college to the present timeri have worked continuously 
unng ie college year for the Dartmouth Dining Association. I started out 
by waiting on table, and have since had several different jobs in the serving 
iitcnen. During the summer I work at various jobs, but try to keep out doors, 

M much as possible. I am only earning a part of my expenses. In a year I earn 
between $400 and $450. I am getting scholarship aid to the amount of $250 

and my relatives supply $400 to make up the rest of my total incom e.-From 
iMrlnwuth College. 

No Trouble Fikwkg Euplotmint 

I have neen self-supporting except for room since I entered college. I find that 
after-school employment curtails my studying somewhat and lowers my marks 
unless I carry fewer academic hours. 1 had little or no trouble finding em- 
ployment in Detroit either in summer or part time after school. I have worked 
« night switchboard man, locomotive machinist, farmer, clerk, timekeeper, 
tMMenger, foreman, and delivery driver.— From College of the City of Detroit. 

Social Standing not ArricnD 

ftt , the Univer8ity of Geor K ia for four years, and my total expenses 
Jnnng this time have been about $2,400, about half of which has been earned 
unng^gcnool time and summer vacations. 

Durmg the first two years in college I worked only at odd jobs in the office 
_ P 1 , Ub , 1C< * tlo,ia ftnd at differ ent places in town. For the past two years I have 
. ftl our college book store (13 hours per week at a salary of $18 per 
Month). I am also taking advanced work in the reserve officers’ training course 
Military unit which has a compensation of $9 per month. This year I am acting 

-proctor in one of the university dormitories for payment of room rent, which 
•mounts to $5 per month. 


self-help foe college students « 


o 

ERLC 


54 

The work in and out of school has interfered very little with scholastic) work, 
but at this place it is very difficult for a person to earn his entire expense without . 
Borne help from the outside. Also a student’s social standing is not materially 
affected by whether or not he works at school, but it isn t considered the 
heroio thing that we hear about on the outside. — From University of Georgia. 

Letter* from College Girls Who Are Working Their Way 


Librart Assistant 

For the past three years I have been an assistant in the college library. When 
a sophomore, 1 began work as a shelf assistant, working three hours a day for 
which I received 26 cents an hour. I had to put up all books, magazines, and 
pamphlets, straighten the shelves, and do other odd jobs as 1 had time. The 
following summer I was given the position which I am now holding d^jk assist- 
ant. Each week I work 22 hours, this being half time, at a salary ofw7.50a 
month. In order to keep up with my classes and to graduate in four years, 1 
have attended two summer schools as I could not take more than 14 quarter- 
hours of class work each term. The first year I worked I made only my spending 
moneyr The next year I paid ray fees and was given spending money by my 
parents. This year 1 have paid all my expenses with my library work and t 
loan scholarship which I receive. 

I consider my work in the library a wonderful experience. It has brought 
me into contact with all the students, developed my exefcutive ability and taught 
me a vocation. My position has also been a means of contact with membsn 
of the faculty which I might not otherwise have been able to have made. How- 
ever, it has kept me out of student activities to a large extent as the library 
assistants do not hold major student offices , — From Alabama College. 

Assistant in Registrar's Omcw 


It has been more or less a habit with me since I went to school to help myself 
through. The first job I ever had was a job as apprentice in a public library. 
This apprenticeship brought me $10 a month, with one hour a day of work and^ 
two nights a week working from 7 to 10 p. m. This job helped me through 
high school, but of course, I lived at home and did not have to pay board. 

After I was graduated from high school, 1 was qualified to take over the high- 
school library, and worked for two years there ordering books and cataloguing 
them. This position brought me $60 a month and I also kept my job at the 
public library. With this experience I wrote to the Utah Agricultural College 
to find if they could help me obtain a position so that I could help myself through 


college. » 

I jvas successful in obtaining a place in the college library, and worked four 
hours a day at 36 cents per hour. Board and room in Logan was $25 a month 
and that took most of my money. I seldom made more than $33 a month work- 
ing by the hour. However, school was worth making a little sacrifice for and I 
made a go of it until spring. 

In the spring I got another opportunity for better pay and a Bteady Job. 
1 took a position in the registrar’s office at $60 a month regular sftlary, with 
a raise of $26 in the summer. During the regular school year I work five boura 
a day and this gives me time enough to carry at least 16 hours of college wort 
I can do it by studying outside of school or work hours. 

It is very Interesting working for the public and coming in contact with » 
many students whom I would not know otherwise, and I have found that ItJ* 
very self -satisfying also to be able to work and use. one’s time toft 


advantage . — From Utah Agricultural College. 



SELF-HELP 


55 


I 


Cooperative Housework Pats 

Before entering college ! worked a year. Such a plan I think inadvisable inas. 
much as during the year bad habits of study are formed that are not easily 
broken; much of the elementary training grows dull and this circumstance adds 
lo the pain in that readjustment period which one must pass through during the 
first weeks of college; a year is spent in building a business prestige that must 
be sacrificed at the end of the year; and in point of fact the amount aaved over 
and above the general living expenses is negligible when one talks in terms of 

hundreds of dollars. It is better to borrow the necessary money than to save in 
this way. 

Waiting table or cooperative housework is the most profitable. Roughly my* " 
rork in a dining room this year pays 60 cents an hour and I am paid for the time 
taken to eat my own meals. This kind of work takes a great deal of time but 
can be definitely planned on as a source of income. Outside jobs are plentiful 
m a college community. The self-help student has to guard herself from the 
possibility of neglecting her academic pursuits by considering them. Many jobs 
are of such a nature that one can study while doing them. Perhaps the most 
desirable of these le taking care of children for socially inclined parents. This 
work pays 25 cents an hour and 6 cents for each extra child. This is the rate 
when they are asleep. (When they are awake the rate is larger, of course, and 
t e girl has to devote her whole time to the children.) The ’parents properly 
chaperone the girl and see her to her dormitory after her task is finished. 

The college laundries always ruin silk underwear and all fine clothing so quickly 
hat many girls are glad to pay 40 cents an hour to have their things laundered 
by hand. Since the self-help girl alway B docs some of her own laundry it pays well 
for the girl to do the laundry for two. In this case the greatest amount of time 
« spent in the actual mechanics of the process and the laundry for two does not 
materially add to the labor. 

One can not earn the entire expenses of college while she is doing college work 
here . — From Welletlcy College. * 


O 

ERLC 


Earns Board and Room 

I have been a self-help student for two years, paying for my board and room 
y itchen work. It seemed to me that board and room constituted the largest 
part of a student’s expense, and that cooking, waiting on table, and washing 
es would be a comparatively easy and certain way to earn it. The families 
wl u-J 0 /!!®® thC 8tudent8 work ape elements that provide the variations in the 
Jr , h L cther there ftre 80cifll distinctions, whether tho work is definitely lim- 
,’ * helher the responsibilities are great or small, all make for success or failure, 
our hours a day is the usual time exacted, and I have concluded that the work on 
Best days does not exceed that. The greatest thing I can say for such a job is 
** fe el'"B of security it lends. . 1 

Aside from cooking I have directed dramatics in a girl's camp for a summer, 
ve designed and constructed two stage settings, have modeled little figures of 
n ns or an archsological museum, and have done some commercial art work 
save paid all of my expenses except tuition, for which I borrowed for one year’ 
““ received scholarships for the others.— From Radeliffe College. 

Worked in Merchant's Dome 


My folks objected to my entering higher schools without funds to fall bac 

Ik , ?"‘ duftt€d from hi « h 8ch001 in 1924. As 1 was unable to go on to anothi 
«sool the next year, I returned to school taking a postgraduate course whic 
me for the 8tate teachers’ examinations. I passed the examination an 


■waved my trial certificate for the State of Arisona in June, 1926. 


I was so lal 

k 




56 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


getting my certificate that I Was unable to obtain a position. The superintendent 
of schools and one of the teachers urged me to enter the University of Arizona on 
borrowed money. With $300 I started to college. 

The first semester I lived with another college girl. W’c were both trying to 
gave, and did save from $7 to $10 over the prices of the school per month. Id 
spite of my saving and the money I earned from odd jobs, i. e., tending btby, 
sewing, and housework by the day, I was unable to stretch $300 over one year of 
school. The second semester I obtained a place in the home of one of the leading 
merchants. I was to work four hours for my board and room. I found that I 
came much nearer to working six hours than four. I was to work from 7 to 7.45 
a. m. and from 4.30 to 8.30 p, m. This left me from 8.30 p. m. to 7 a. in. to study 

for a 14-unit course, and study I did. 

I am now borrowing money to attend summer school in order to obtain a posi- 
tion for next winter. 1 plan to pay back the money which hus been loaned, save 
enough to get a new start, and return ^o the university another year.— From 

University oj Arizona. 

• * 

Cooking and Cleaning 

I was given a service Hcholfirship which permitted me to work in the library one 
• hour each day and yielded $5$J in money. 1 sjxmt the first semester in getting 
acquainted and getting settled. Before the year was over I had found a home 
near the college where I could work and earn enough money to pay all of mj 
expenses. The work was pleasant and not too hard. I earned $10 each week 
during the summer months, and $5 a week besides board and room all during the 
school year. I found it very hard at first liecause I was so inexj>crienred, but it 
has become routine work now, and 1 can get through with it much more rapidly. 
Cooking and cleaning have been my work, but I have done other things suchu 
driving n onr, marketing, nursing a sick woman, caring for the flowers, etc. Some 
days I work there 12 hours I >csides my school work anil never less thuu 8. My 
grades have been .good and this year they average A. By doing six weeks work 
this summer, 1 can graduate in three years and a half. It has all tx>en very h»rt 
because I have not had any financial help from any source; yet I am very sure if 
it were all to be dono over again, 1 would be willing to do it the same way— 
From Shurtleff College {Illinois). 

Makes B (Trades 

I have-earned a part of my expense* each one of the three years I have attended 
the university. During my freshman year I worked for 35 to 40 cents an hour 
doing housework, which included tasks at general cleuning, cooking, ironing, 
washing windows, sometimes washing clothes, washing dishes, cleaning w 
work, etc., totaling about 7 to 14 hours each week. I-'or four months 1 helped on 
« a classical investigation, a clerical tyi>e of work requiring no special traimng- 
7 to 14 hours a week at 30 cents an hour. 

In my sophomore year, I worked in a private home for my board and room, 
but on account of the lag^; distance from school, I did not find it very satisfactory 
1 was supposed to work four hours a day on the average. Such things as taking 
care of children did not seem to be part of the four hours. I had to pay about 
$3 a month for carfare, which was an item 1 had to watch closely. 

This year I have been a reader for a class of English rhetoric students, for which 
I received $25 a semester. The work is roughly calculated to take about 6 bourn 
but almost invariably it took about 6, not considering all the time devoted to 
conferences with the teacher about delinquent students. I have done abou 
80 houre of work during the year as library attendant, this paid but 26 cento w 





SELF-HELP 


57 


hour, but is really quite profitable because it permits some studying to be done 
on the side. . • 

My grude average has been over B for the entire three years, and I have credit for 
a full three and one-half regular years of college work during the three years and 
the six weeks summer work which 1 have done.— From University of Iowa. 

In College Activities 

I ain earning all my expenses and receive financial help from no one. In the 
summer months 1 am assistant nurse in our fresh-air baby camp — a summer 
hospital fpr babies under 4 years of age. I was offered the job merely because 
of good recommendations from friends for I have had no nurse's training what- 
ever. The work is interesting and gfvee one a cliance to use her knowledge of 
foods, physiology, and chemistry as acquired in college courses. The job paid 
me $15 a week (7 a. m. to 5 p. m. daily). Ip the evenings I worked in a home 
as tutor for a small boy and did sewing thereby earning my board, room, and 
laundry work, In this way I wa6 able to save most of my wages. Out of the 
$1(10 1 earned I usually saved $130 to start into school on. I have done this 
same vfftrk for three summers. 

In Hie winter I work in a home for my horned and room, which takes about 
three hours of my time each day. (Otherwise I’d probably waste that three 
Imurs.) Tuition and books each year amount to alx>ut $175. I have received 
n scholarship of $60 each year. That leaves me a deficit, of course, so I’ve had 
to borrow- $175 since I’ve been in college and I’m now completing my junior year. 

I get many chances of evenings to pack up my books and go tt> stay-with children 
while their parents go to the theater. That usually amounts to about $1 for an 
evening. 

1 could have Rotten along on less money if I had not decided to get the most 
out of college. I belong to a local sorority, to a national dramatic fraternity, 
and to a national forensic fraternity. I am in nearly all school activities, yet I 
dudy when it is time to study and made five ”AV’ and one “B" last semester 
I make all my own clothes so that I cnr> be dressed well on all occasions. 

1 feed tlmt no one has gotten more out of the thre^ years of college than I, yet 
no one could possibly have been busier for I have not neglected the social, intel- 
lectual, moral, or industrial part of my education, and I should like to say to 
direr students that it is not such a big job after all for i>eoplc do their best to 

Mkc everything pleasant.-From FainnourU College ( Municipal University of 
hicmto, A a ns.). . 

V 

No Diftcrknce in social Standi no 

"hen I finished high school it seemed that it would be impossible for me to 
Wvnllege because of financial reasons, but fortunatclv, I had a friend who 
8U Tilr RettinR mc in at Picdnu)nt with a loan scholarship to cover about 
tTti ✓ ° f my CXI . K,|l8es - 1 had to work to cover the other half. This is my 
i year. The first year 1 worked in the dining room as waitress. I helped 
jerve the meals three tiroes daily (two *nd a half hours a day at 18 cents per 
wur). My work the second year was assistant librarian (18 cents per hour) 
‘in year I have been superintendent of one of the college dining rooms which 
u paid *33 per term o£ six weeks. None of this work has been unpleasant— I 
„ * rather enjoyed it. There Is no difference in social standing because one 
arks here. All the students, whether they work or not, are pleasant and 
nen \ toward each other. I feel that I have been extremely fortunate in being 

' C a part ° f my way throil « h code 8 e and I firmly believe in the old 

P V\ here there is a will there is a way.”— From Piedmont College (Georgia), 


58 


SELF-HELP FOR CObLEGE STUDENTS 



Selt-Helt Oiels Need Health, Courage, and Contidence 


Three weeks before I returned to college for my junior year, I found I mart 
work my entire way. I immediately borrowed $276 for tuition and started for 
college. I had never worked before so was forced to wait on table for my board 
and take care of children for my other. expenses. I sang at different churches 
and received 15 each time. In November 1 started advertising work and earned 
$25 extra. I sold 300 university calendars and earned $120 at that, I sold 
college trays and earned $25 more. 1 went into advertising campaign work and 
earned $12 for that and $22.50 more for one week's work during examinations 
I earned $22.50 for two weeks demonstrating a vacuum cleaner in a department 
store (afternoons). Beginning February I held a quartet position ($15 per month) 
singing one service per Sunday. For the last two months I 6old silk 6tockingi 
earning as high as $6 per afternoon working the offices. 

I have met all my expenses, bought all my clothes and have had all the clothe* 
and luxuries I couid desire. My only regret is health and scholastic standing. 
Both have to suffer. The latter is compensated in the vast experience one 

acquires. The former had to suffer most. 

Earning one’s way can be done if one has health, courage, and confidence.- 

From Syracuse (N. Y.) University. 


Nearly all higher educational institutions in the United States ‘ are 
making some provision for the sludent who must earn his way. This 
information has been obtained from (1) questionnaires on student 
employment addressed to the several institutions, (2) annual report* 
of student employment bureaus which give fairly accurate figures, 
(3) estimates of college administrators, (4) college bulletins on self- 
support, (5) college catalogues (G) and men and women who art 
actually earning their way through college. Seven hundred and 
sixty-three institutions located in every State in the^Union and 
registering 84 per cent of all college men and women (732,211 stu- 
dents^ provide in some manner for those who need material assistance. 
With the exception of about *27 colleges (with approximately 7,000 
students) the remaining 305 institutions also provide limited oppor- 
tunities to work one’s way, but make no estimates. 

Figures and estimates on self-help can not be obtained from every 
institution. Where this activity is sponsored by well-organized 
student employment bureaus, accurate figures are reported on the 
number of gmployed students, and on the amount of their earnings, 
where employment surveys have been made, accurate estimates are 
given; some are able to estimate the number of self-supporting students, 
hut can not report their earnings; and others make no estimate in 
figures, but report that a high percentage of their students earn 
theii way. To show the information in concise form, several tables 


Extent of Self-help in Colleges and Universities 


have been arranged. 


1 Tb« Educational I 
UoltadStatw In IMS. 


• Tb« Educational Directory* lasutd aanuall^ toy tb« U. 8. Bur. of Eduo. r list* 1,068 Institution! la to 



SELF-HELP 


59 


Table 1 shows the character of the 1,068 higher educational insti- 
tutions together with enrollments of all college students. 

Table 2 shows the extent of self-help in these institutions. 

Table 3 gives the number of college men and women who arc earn- 
ing their entire way through college. 

Table 4 estimates the student earnings of all self-help students 
during term time in 61 1 institutions. 

Table 5 gives information on each of the 624 four-year colleges and 
universities. 

Higher Education in the United States— Institutions and Enrollments 

Nearly 900,000 men and women are enrolled in 1,068 institutions of 
higher education in the United States. Of these institutions 36 per 
cent are coeducational, 11 per cent for men, 11 per cent for women, 
15 per cent independent professibnal schools, 15 per cent 2-year 
junior colleges, 9 per cent teachers colleges, and 3 per cent are exclu- 
sively for negro students. The coeducational colleges and univer- 
sities claim the most students — 68 per font of the men and 59 per 
cent of the women. The men’s colleges enroll 17 per cent of the men. 
The women’s colleges enroll 15 per cent of the women, while the 
teachers colleges register another 17 per cent of the women. The 
following table shows the number of higher educational institutions 
together with student enrollments for the year 1927-28. These 

figures ar^ printed for comparison with the figures which follow on 
self-help. 

Table 1 . — Higher education in the United. Statet 


Institutions listed by the l'. 8 Bureau of Education 
(Director)’ 1928) 

Student enrollments In J 927-28 

Trpe 

Num- 

ber 

j Ter 
cent 

Men 

Per 

cent 

Women 

Pee 

cent 

Total 

students 

Per 

cent 

Coeducational.. 

383 

118 

! S6 
11 


ftG 

223,794 

5ft 

664,348 

64 

Men s policies.. 

Can 

82, fi08 

On 

17 

^omen’s colleges 

123 

11 

57, 621 
3,983 
30,817 
66,286 
6,775 

16 

1 

82, 696 

9 

ntytessional 

157 

155 

96 

36 

16 
16 
o > 

in 1 48 

A 

57, 621 
34,131 
36,878 
88, 095 

7 

Jj&ior colleges 

•flirt net 


4 

Jtachers colleges 

i o, uni 
21 HDQ 

d 

A 

6 

17 

4 

'or negroes... 

3 

*l f ouw 
7 MJ 

a 

r> 

10 

• 

J 1 


1 

2 

14,319 

2 

Total 

1,068 

106 

408,813 

100 

878, 270 

100 

878,088 

100 


Students Employed 

College men.— Nearly one-half (46 per cent) of all college men are 
njwcing some effort to earn at least a part of their college expenses. In 
the following States the largest numbers of men are employed : Illinois, 
Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Ohio Cali* 
loraia, Washington, Minnesota, Kansas, and Michigan. In general, 
31596°— 29 5 


60 


SELF-HELP FOB COLLEGE STUDENTS 



many occupational opportunities are offered in tho East, West, and 
Middle West where colleges and universities are clustered around the 
great centers of industry. In the 4-year coeducational colleges and 
universities more men are working their way than in all other 

institutions together. . 

College women . — One out of every four college women is contribut- 
ing to her own support while attending college. The smallest per- 
centage of self-help women is found in the women’s colleges (15 per 
cent) where expenses are highest and in teachers’ colleges (15 per 
cent) where expenses are lowest. Obviously the girl who attends an 
expensive woman’s college can usually afford the cost without work, 
while the girl who attends a teachers’ college is able before she enters to 
earn sufficient amounts to cover her necessary expenses. In the 
coeducational colleges and imiversities more than three times as 
many women are employed compared with those in all other institu- 
tions. The greatest numbers of employed college women aro working 
in Illinois, New York, California, Pennsylvania, Murylaud, Minne- 
sota, Ohio, and Washington. 

Of all college students, one out of every three w;jp at least partially 
self-supporting during the year 1927-28. In 763 institutions 265,208 
college men and women out of a total enrollment of 738,211 were 
earning a part of their expenses for a higher education. Although 
305 colleges and universities did not supply figures, most of these 
institutions reported that “a large proportion” or a ‘/good number” 
or “the majority” of their students were working their way. These 
305 institutions kept no records of self-help; they enroll one-sixth of 
all college students, and it is probable that at least one-third of their 
students are working their way. 

Forty per cent of the students in the coeducational institutions 
are employed — 49 per cent of the men and 26 per cent of the women. 
In the men’s colleges 30 per cent of the students are working. In 
the women’s colleges 15 per cent are partially self-supporting. In 
the professional schools specializing in law, theology, engineering, 
pharmacy, etc., three-fourths of the students are self-supporting in 
whole or in part; in many of tho law schools which provide late 
afternoon classes, All of the students are entirely self-supporting. In 
the junior colleges 31 per cent of the students assist themselves. In 
the teachers collegrs a fifth of tho students are earning their way, 
expenses are so much less in these institutions that many students are 
able to remain away teaching for a year and return with sufficient 
funds to pay all expenses of the following year. In the college* 
especially for negro students, over a half of the-men and a fifth of the 
women are employed. These figures arc tabulated in Table 2. 


ERLC 


9 



SELF-HELP 


61 


Table 2. Extent of self-help in colleges and universities ( 1927-28 ) 


Institutions 

Men 

Women 

Total 

% 

Typo 

Num- 

ber 

Enroll- 

ment 

’ [ Per 
8elf- 1 cent 
help of en- 
men j roll- 
1 menl 

Enroll- 

ment 

Self- 

help 

women 

Per 
cent 
of en- 
roll- 
ment 

Men 

and 

women 

enrolled 

Self- 

help 

men 

and 

women 

Per- 
cent 
of en- 
roll- 
ment 

foeclucational 

336 

94 

93 

64 

103 

49 

24 

311,376 

71,000 

151,331 ! 49 

21,705 1. 30 

206T15S 

53,600 

26 

517,531 
71,900 
48,501 
12,322 
28,408 
48. 101 
11.448 

205,131 

21,706 

7,156 

9.097 
8,726 
8,949 
4. 444 

40 

30 
15 
74 

31 
19 
89 

Men’s colleges 

Women's colleges. . 

Professional 

Junior ro)lei<es 

Teachers colleges... 
Negro colleges 

48,501 
1,045 
15,411 
35, 485 
5.208' 

7, 156 
695 
3,139 
5, 431 
1,003 

15 

67 

20 

15 

19 

11.277 

12,997, 

12.616 

6.240 

8,402 | 75 

5, 587 43 

3,513 1 28 

3,441 55 

Tola). .. 

763 

305 

426. 406 
32, 406 

194, 184 ^ 46 

311,805 

67,471 

71,024 

23 

738.211 
139. 877 

9 T. r . one 

i/i 

Colleges nni sui>- 
plymg figures 

Grand total.. 

1 

1,068 

498.812 


379, 276 




878,088 

1 


College Students Who Were Entirely Self-supporting in 1927-28 


One-sixth of all college students were entirely self-supporting in 
1927-28. Of the men 20 per cent (64,089) earned their entire way- 
22 per cent of the men in coeducational institutions, 6 per cent of the 
men m men 's colleges, 54 per cent of the men in the professional 
schools, 15 per cent in the junior colleges, 11 per cent in the teachers 
colleges, and 37 per cent in the colleges especially for negroes. Of the 
women 11 per cent (20,252) were earning their entire support, 14 per 
cent of the women in coeducational institutions, 2 per cent of tho 
women in women’s colleges, 55 per cent of the women in professional 
schools, i per cent in the junior colleges, 4 per cent in the teachers 
colleges, and 3 per cent in the colleges especially for negroes. These 
percentages represent 481 institutions which enroll 65 per cent of all 
college men and 46 per cent of all college women. These data are 
summarized in Table 3. > 


3 

ERIC 


I able 3. — College students who earned their entire^tb in 1927-38 


Institutions 


Typo 


Coeducational, 


Men s colleges 

^omeo \s colleges 
Professional . 


Junior colleges... 

college*. 

N’«po colleges 


Total (eicludlng dupll- 

P 

not reporting flgurw . 



Men 

Women 

Total 

Nunilw 
report iag 
figures 

Number 

entirely 

self-sup- 

porting 

Per cent 
of total 
enroll- 
ment 

Number 

entirely 

self-sup- 

porting 

Per cent 
of total 
enroll- 
ment 

Men and 
women 

Per cent 
of total 
enroll- 
ment 

225 

52. 274 

22 



} 70,161 

a, 021 

441 


174 



17,887 

14 n 

19.0 

66 

3,021 

6 


* 

33 



445 



o 

12 

38 

4, 177 

54 

l 

] 4.542 

15 



365 


64.4 

57 

1,527 

i& 


j 2,108 

49 



581 

7 

11.8 

6.4 

25 

26 
23 

959 

ii 

# 

j 1.768 

2,131 

37 

809 

4 

10 



166 

3 

} 2,296 

20.5 

» 481 
1 587 

64,069 

20 

30,252 

11 

84,341 

1\8 

1,068 


i i ■ 


- 

. r 








•lZ2SJ!!! nK lln <,nn, JJ mcr ’l of 324.696 m«n »ml 177.779 wotnAO 
prwentm^in enrollment of 174.110 men and 301.907 women, 


02 SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

* Earnings of College Students 

t 

In 1927-28 ‘college men and women earned $32,500,000 during 
term-time. This total represents the earnings of 162,413 men and 
33 856 women in 611 institutions of higher learpin^ Estimates 
were not made by all institutions, but accurate figlires are reported 
by many well-established student employment bureaus; estimates 
are furnished by some colleges where investigations have been made; 
and rough guesses, which in most cases are conservative, are given 
bv others The 457 institutions not included were unable to make 
estimates of any kind, but most indicated a large percentage of 
self-help students. 

The average amount earned was $169 for men and $149 for women. 
Averages of this sort may mean little since a few students earn large 
amounts— several thousand dollars per year, while others receive 
comparatively small sums for their efforts. The averages shown 
in Table 4 are at least reasonable and are surely comparative. 

In the coeducational institutions since larger numbers of students 
are working their way, it is to be expected that the total earnings 
are higher. In the professional schools especially schools of law, 
many students are working at regular employment and taking law 
on the side; opportunities for self-help in medicine, dentistry, and 
first-year engineering are comparatively few. 

Table 4 . — Student earnings during term lime 




Institutions 

Men 


Women 


Type 

Number 
reporting 
earnings j 

Number 
who earn 

Total 

earnings 

Average 
por man 

Number 
who earn 

Total 

earnings 

per 

TOtOiO 

f'oMliicntioniil ... 

315 

174 | 

« l 
66 

19 

8 

54 

77 

18 

23 

14 

11 

134. 716 

$22, 755, 941 

$169 




23.137 

13.738,574 

U63 

pn 'm ml locos 

20.888 
i, 380 

2, U88. Ml 
' "70.721 

143 

537 

5,455 

ioi 

620.092 

1? IUU4 , 

til 

ri 

Women’s colleges 

Prnfu&slonnl - 

Junior colleens. 





2,216 

373. 483 l i® 

Tunchm-s onlWns ...... - 

1,433 

195.432 

136 

2,582 

nf.7 100 

K.’ Acrr/i fv >1 l(tf AC ... 

* t 





365 

28. i 17 


J> w IX * i 

Total (eicluclingilupll- 
cftlns) - - - 

611 

457 

1,068 

162,413 

i 

27, 371,285 

169 

33,856 

5,055,018 

Mi 

Colleges not estimating in 
figures 

Grand total 


Men’s earnings— In 315 coeducational institutions, 134,716 mm 
earned nearly $23,000,000 at the average rate of $169. In 92 mens 
colleges 20,889 students earned nearly $3,000,000. In 19 profession^ 
schools 1,380 men earned over $700,000 averaging *537. n 
junior colleges 2,611 men earned over $500,000 averaging $193; the* 


SELF-HELP 


63 

students are young, probably from 18 to 20 years of age, and many 
live at home while pursuing: the 2-year course of study. In 18 teachers 
colleges 1,433 men earned nearly $200,000; expenses are less in those 
institutions, and earnings can be made to cover a greater number of 
items. In 14 colleges especially for negroes 1,384 students earned 
$186,000. Men students earned over five times as much as the women 
students, and practically five times as many were employed. 

Women's earnings— Over $5,000,000 was earned by 33,856jkollege 
women enrolled in 359 institutions of higher education. CtCpared 
with college men, college women average smaller earnings; their 
occupations are less strenuous; they are not eligible for as wide a 
variety of employment and frequently are paid small compensation. 

In the coeducational institutions 23,137 women earned nearly $4,000,- 
000; in (>6 women's colleges 5,455 women earned $620,092; 101 women 
in 8 professional schools earned $37,660; in 77 junior colleges 2 216 
women earned $373,483; in 23 teachers colleges 2,582 women earned 

$257,090; and m 11 colleges especially for negroes, 365 women earned 
♦28,117. 

This information as reported by the institutions is summarized in 

lable 4. 

% 

Summary 

This study embraces all institutions of higher education, but all of ' 
the information i^ not available for each institution. Some colleges 
report self-help students, but do not estimate earnings; some do not 
mdicate figures but* make general statements that a majority of their 
students or a few of their students are employed during tenrftime. 

However, 84 per cent of all college students are enrolled in the 763 
institutions which submitted estimates of self-help students. Practi- 
cally all institutionsfmake some provision for a student tow-ork his 
way in part. • 

In the coeducational institutions half of the men and a quarter of 
the women are employed and both men and women find many op- 
portunities to earn expenses while in college. The large numbers of j 

mature men and women, teachers and business people enrolled tends 
to increase the number of students who are entirely self-supporting, 
the favorable location of many of those universities in great cities 
attracts many students who must earn their way. (See Table 5 for 
self-help in individual institutions.) 

In men s colleges the percentage of students working their way is 

pJT u ^ er cen ^ many of them the average earnings are 

mguer than $169. Several important institutions are making special 
Provision for men to earn while in college and to obtain business 
®*pener»ce by part-time employment. A number of men’s colleges 
naintain well organized student employment bureaus for the mutual j 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


64 

benefit of students and patrons. These bureaus are attracting the 
attention of banks, department stores, shippers, magazines, and 
industrial employers who are looking for persons of proved ability. 
Some men’s colleges have established systems of vocational guidance, 
student personnel, and cooperative, education in order to coordinate 
education with industry. In 94 men’s colleges 30 per cent of the 
students are earning about $3,000,000. (For individual institutions 
see Table 5.) 

In the women’s colleges comparatively few students earn any large 
part of their expenses. A few of these institutions make a special 
effort to provide opportunities for their students, but the percentage 
of workers is low (15 per cent), and the earnings of those employed 
seldom cover the expense of board alone. * A score of women’s col- 
leges make no provision for girls who must earn a part of their ex- 
penses. Most women’s colleges, however, assist their students by 
means of scholarships, student loans, various alumni funds, and out- 
side aids. In 93 women’s colleges 15 per cent, of the students were 
employed and in 60 institutions the women earned over $000,000 in 
1927-28. (For individual institutions see Table 5.) 

In Table 5 which follows each of the 624 four-year institutions of 
higher education are shown together with the 1927-28 enrollment, 
the number of self-help- students, the number of students who are 
earning their entire way and the amount of student earnings. Econ- 
omy of space precludes publishing the data relating to the other 444 
professional schools, junior colleges, teachers colleges, and negro col- 
leges, but brief information on these institutions is available in Part 
III of this bulletin. 


Table 5. — Extent of self-help in colleges and universities 


Institution 


Enrollment, 

1927-28 


a * 


ALABAMA 


Alabama College * 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute K 

Alliens College 

Birmingham-Southern > 

Howard College 1 ..... 

Judson College 1 — 

Bpring Hill College 1 

Ht. Bernard College 

University of Alabama 1 

Women's College of Alabama.... 


ARIZONA 

University of Arizona 1 — 


ARKANSAS 


Arkansas College 

College of the (harks. 
Galloway College 


Men 


1, 433 


634 

470 


150 

32 

1,800 


1,268 


113 

190 


Women 


Self-help Students earn- stndcot 

students Ing entire way teraHiiw 

earninp 

(mfottf 

Men 


Men 


800 

117 

172 

432 

235 

295 


390 

182 


000 

650 


786 


96 

100 

226 


30 

0 

1,000 


Women 


84 ! . 


Women won*) 


23 

30 

10 

29 


360 


27 

161 


400 

50 


30 


291 


16 8 
136 47 

10 I 


saw 


00 


58,0 

■8 


41 ,® 


w 


Accredited. 



SELF-HELP 


65 


Table 5 .— Extent of self-help in colleges and universities — Continued 


Institution 


ark AN8AB- — continued 

Henderson- Brown Colley© ! 11A j 

Hendrix College 1 r™ 

Utile Kock College * * ; 

Ouachita C ollege » 1 i«- 

Utiiversity of Arkansas ■ 1 

California 

California Christian College mu 

California Institute of Technology f > fi1u 

College of Notre Dame 

College of the Pacific 1 

Dominican Cnllego 1 

Uiand Stanford Junior University » 

Loyola c'ollege 

Mills College • 

Occidental C ollege i 

Pacific Union College... 

Pasadena College Tfr 

Pomona College * * "* ” 4 • A 

St Ignatius College ' . mr 

St Mary's College.. j<Jv 

Cniversity of California • K ,~Y 

University of Redlands « 

l Diversity nf Sant a Clara i -mia 

njirersity of Southern California C ' 4 him 

Whittier College t 1 


COLORADO 

Colorado Agricultural College 

Colorado ( 'n||oge 1 

Colorado School of Mines... 

Colorado \\ omorCs C ollege 
Loretto Heights Colloge ' 

c'ollege 

I Diversity of Colorado 1 

University of Denver 1 

CONNECTICUT 

Alhcrtus Magnus . . . 

UoQDtvtirut A gricult nrai "Coliece 
Cflonertinit C'ollege for Women E 

Trtoity ( ollege 1 

Woleyan C nlversliy 1 

1 ale University 

DELAWARE 

naJverplty of Delaware 1. 

district or Columbia 

J®erican University 1. 

Catholic Sisters ( ’ollege 
ijholie University of America 1 
JhlUudet (’ollege .... 

SfoWowq I’niversliv 
S**® Washington University « 

ulnity C olleg^i.. 

Washington Missionary College 

FLORIDA 

College for Women 1 
B. Hietsnn University 

Mima ('ollege 1 

■wthem College. 

UalfenUty of Florida « 

1 Aocnxlited. 



Many. 


71,400 


1 No record. 


O 

ERIC 


o 

ERLC 


66 SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Table 5. — Extent of telf-help in college* and universities — Continued 


Institution 


GEORGIA 


Enrollment, 

1927-28 


Mon 


Agnes Scott Collage » 

Bessie Tift College . 

Brenau College !- 

Emory University > }.• ‘f£‘ 

Georgia School of Technology 1 1 

Georgia Stale College for Women i I | l.O'l 

La Orange College 

Mercer University 1 jjj j 


W omen 


Self-help 

students 


Men 


152 


North Georgia Agricultural College. 

Oglethorpe University 

Piedmont College — 

Shorter College ' 

University of Georgia' 

Wesleyan College » 


IDAHO 


College of Idaho 

Gooding (College 

University of Idaho 


310 

109 


1.282 


~ *• 


ILLINOIS 

Armour Institute of Technology 

Augusiana College ‘ - 

Aurora College : 

Bradley Polytechnic Institute 

Cartbage College 1 

De Paul University 1 

Elmhurst College 

Eureka College ‘ 

Greenville College 

Illinois College 

Illinois Wesleyan University 

Illinois Woman's College ‘ 

James Milliken University' 

Knox College ' 

Lake Forest College ‘ - 

Lewis Institute ‘ 

Lincoln College - 

Lombard College 

Loyola University 1 

McKendree College 

Monmouth College C 

Mount Morris College — 

North Central College ' 

Northwestern University ' 

Rockford College » 

Rosary College 1 - 

81. Francis Xavier College ... .. 

81. Pro 9 opius College 

8t. Viator College 

8hurllefY College » 

University of Chicago i 

University of Illinois ' 

Wheaton College » 


162 

C9 

1,316 


694 

262 

67 

513 

139 

1,600 

115 

120 

103 

274 

356 


263 

380 

185 

2,000 

92 

136 

2,050 

179 

292, 

129 

302 

1,480 


INDIANA 


Butler University ' 

Earlham College * 

Evansville College 

De Pauw University' ^ 

Franklin College * 

Goshen College 

Hanover College ' 

Huntington College 

Indiana Central College 

Manchester College 

Marlon College- 

Oakland City College 

Purdue Universliy' 

Roee Polytechnic Institute 
8t. Mary's Colli*# 1 


255 

Ml 

166 

15,109 

9,368 

220 


771 

193 

301 

m 

176 

97 

220 

38 

179 

300 

M 

450 

,400 

271 


1 Accredited, 


233 

138 

849 


Women 


330 
1, 150 


209 

65 

252 

188 

400 


130 
145 
lift 
291 
324 
326 
'£4 
108 
1,000 
66 
164 
2,844 
• 137 
233 
134 
274 
1,435 
406 
281 
260 


6 
174 
13,955 
3,370 
250 1 


787 

285 

361 

736 

133 

113 

194 

34 

214 

44)0 

100 

650 

600 


451 


300 

40 

35 


513 


162 

62 

180 


485 

130 

49 

350 

42 

800 

80 

60 

25 

160 

105 


100 

279 

147 

1,500 

73 

74 
1,230 

35 

150 

97 

261 

296 

U) 


5 

30 

50 

9,065 

2,063 

132 


509 

0) 

200 

350 

80 


(») 

32 

89 

100 

23 

30 

360 

(>) 


100 

20 


0 

396 

31 


177 

134 

34 


Students earn- 
ing entire way 



Mon 


ft 

200 


100 

10 


Student 
term-lime 
eaminp 
(men and 
Women women) 


75 

38 

1.50 

46 

100 


15 

7ft 

80 

107 

172 


59 


234 


50 


1 

400 

-no 


50 


15 

50 

102 

1,000 

9 

0 


10 

25 

0 

113 


1 

35 

3,489 

235 

100 


574 


100 

119 

30 


18 

107 

100 

20 

20 

50 


30 

• No record. 


1 

2 

20 

1,208 

533 

80 


20 


23 


76 

4 

10 

200 


23 


67 


$ 16,000 

4,200 

8,000 

33.000 

120.000 
12000 
2,348 

30,000 

3,400 

5,000 


4*0 

51,300 

1241 


42.000 
12,740 

18.000 


48,500 


45 


1 

500 

ft 

0 


5 

98 

147 

60 


1U0 


25 


4,000 

35.000 
8,145 

225,000 

14.000 

6.000 

2,500 

58,783 

38,412 


10,000 

76, 032 

14.700 
1, 125,000 

18, W 
3L42R 

123.000 
5,000 

75.000 

17.700 

36.000 

9.000 


21500 

3,«» 

60) 

9.150 

5,000 

50,100 

U01Q.W 

13,300 


50,900 


90,000 

77,839 

8,000 


aw 


4,5®0 

2,300 

3,000 

AW 


aw 



SELF-HELP g7 

Table 5.— Extent of self-help in colleges and universities — Continued 


3 

ERIC 


Institution 


Indiana— continued 

8t. Mary of the Woods College 

Taylor University 

University of Indiana » 

University of Notre Dame *_ . JII III 

Valparaiso Uni versity ..." 

Wabash College t 


IOWA 


Buena Vista College 

Central College —II""**" 

Coe College 1 -IIIIIIIIII 

Columbia Col lege 1 *”] 

Cornell College i IIIIIIIIIIIIII 

Des Moines University ’* 

Drake University » .11111*1 

Ellsworth College IIIIIIIII 

Graceland College IIIIIIIIII 

Grinned College 1 

Iowa State l 'allege ’ of” .\grieiuVure’ ’ and 

Mechanic ArLs i 

Iowa Wesleyan ( 'ollego « IIIIIIIII 

John Fletcher College I - 1 III I 

Lenoi College [ 

Luther College > II__IIII 

Moramgsido College III II II I IIIIIIIII 
Mount St. Joseph College * 

Parsons College * 

Penn College »_ 1111111171111111111*” 

6t. Ambrose College I] 

Blmpson College 1 

State University of Iowa ^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

University of Dubuque C 
l pper Iowa University 


W artburg College -.-IIIIIII 

Western Union College.. II IIIIIIIIII HI” 


KANSAS 


Baker University * 

Belhany College 

BeLhei College I" 

College of Emporia *CIII I IIII IH*I 

Friends Cni versity 1 -..HI**"" 

Kan&is City U Diversity 

Kansas Stale Agricultural College U 
Kansas Wesleyan University. 
McPherson College 

Ottawa Unlvorsity i... 

Bt Benedict’s College 
n. Mary’s Collego i.. 

Southwestern College »__. 

Starling College 

University of Kansas » 

University of Wichita i 

Waahburn College t ’’II 


KENTUCKY 


Aabury College 

College *. 

Centre College uI.IHI 

Georgetown College 1 
Kentucky Wesleyan College. 
Klngswood Holiness College. 

Jjfuen ( ollego. 

JL Mary s College.... 
Tfinsyivania College 
Union College. 


University of Kentucky i 
University of Loulavtlle * 


Enrollment, 

1^27-28 


Men Women 


160 

1,8(13 

2,981 

451 

415 


121 

157 

477 

265 

232 

382 

750 

125 

130 

347 

2,740. 

128 

115 

42 

384 

314 


259 

173 

1,489 


181 


250 

242 

415 

300 

3,550 

130 

181 

79 

120 


211 
, 228 
117 
1 83 
235 
52 
2.562 
349 
200 
173 
303 
450 
440 
206 
2.813 
385 
509 


306 

1,177 

271 

1H5 

191 

49 

161 

90 

131 

146 

1,719 

890 


140 

140 

442 

38 

279 

347 

800 

325 

140 

398 

1,024 

209 

132 

30 


400 

300 

250 

395 


350 

2,190 

80 

209 


107 


237 

336 

116 

197 

258 

164 

1,330 

617 

280 

232 


908 

206 

1,650 

358 

606 


337 

1,048 

52 

220 

187 

61 


20 

164 

146 

866 

418 


1 Accredited. 


Self-help 

students 


Students earn- 


fiftudent 


mgernireway 


Men 

Womei 

a Men 

\Jfome 

- 1 UIU&3 

(men and 
n women) 


2 




80 

196 

238 

i 70 

434 

10 

140 

100 

5 

63 

S1& 750 
84,478 

v tt) |U|n 

314 

124 

79 

147 

25 

42 

- A l, IW 

21,360 

1 9 inn 




1*, wu 

135 

25 

r 334 
<*) 

126 

37 

16 


18 

63 

4 

15 

2 

2 

2.500 

87,533 

97 

286 

47 

52 

13 

100 

9 

27,927 

28.900 

50,000 

1,600 

5,000 

500 

15 

300 

10 

100 

50 

59 

41 



161 


35 


41.' 890 
70,275 

1. 416 
(*) 

275 

206 

35 

40 




4 non 

i’) 

" 106 
200 




", uw 

90* 

3 



5.000 

46,200 

van 

V... 

8 


2 

150 

73 

100 

150 

81 

25 

10 

25 

14 

nuu 
25,000 
9.400 
?0 firm 

47 

800 

60 

200 

12 

15 

1U, KMAJ 

17,800 

80.000 

6,895 

25.600 

9 VV) 

65 

20 

1 


100 

50 

114 

27 

31 

66 

24 

23 

7 

A dW 

15.427 

157 

100 

96 

70 

68 

8 

30 

5 

25,500 

78 

52 

39 

24 


120 

60 

18 

32,925 

18,800 

188 

C) 

70 

36 

3 

1,374 

175 

404 

164 

903 

239 

137,400 
15,000 
3,800 
69. 125 
• 2 un 

38 

43 



140 

IK 

74 

60 

16 

35 

196 

206 

"'‘*304 

206 

0 

74 

”216' 

3,500 

19,600 

20,000 

75.000 

180,600 

1, 701 
280 
(•> ■ 

429 

180 

718 

77 

237 

25 

120 
1,099 
109 . 
94 

120 

925 

4 

110 . 

0 

460 

22 

0 

392 

Q 

28,800 
126, 961 
34,720 
9.400 
4,320 

28 

4 

6 


151 

10 

6 

4 . 

45 


26 . 
88 


3.000 

9.000 
8,500 

14,100 
172,800 
26, 700 

90 

85 

20* 
100 L 


141 

140 . 



862 

267 

125 j 
127 I., 

200 

25 


1 No raoord 


68 - 


T 


8ELF-HELP FOR «*5LlEGE STUDENTS 



Table 5. — Extent of self-help in colleges and universities — Continued 


Institution 


LOUISIANA 


Centenary College 1 

Jefferson College 

Louisiana College 1 

Louisiana 8 late University and Agricultural 

and Mechanical College 1 

Loyola University — 

Mansfield Female < ollege . — - 

Southwestern Louisiana Institute L- 

Tulane University 1 


MAINE 


Bates College * 

Bowdoln College 1 — 

Colfc^College * 

Uwfrslty of Maine *. 


Enrollment. 

1927-28 


Men 


Self-help 

students 


Students earn- 
ing entire way 


4 


RYLAND 




Blue Ridge Collego 

College of Notre Darno of Maryland 

Qoucher College * 

Rood College 1 — 

Johns llopkliis University 

Loyola College 

Maryland Oollegfcfur Women. 
Mount St. Mary's College L-. 

8t. John's Collette 1 

St. Joseph’s College 

United Stales Naval Academy 

University of Maryland 1 

Washington College » 

Western Maryland Collego L_. 


MASSACHUSETTS 


Amherst Collego > 

Boston College 1 

Boston University 

Clark University 1 

Collego of the Holy Cross ‘ 

Emmanuel College 

Harvard University 1 

International Young Men’s Christian As-* 

sociutlon College — 

Lowell Textile School. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology >... 

Mount Holyoke College 1 

Northeastern University 

Rad ell fie College 1 

Simmons College 1 

Smith College 1 

Tufts College 1 

Wellesley College 1 

Wheaton College 1 

Williams College 1 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 1 


32*% 

ITiO 

210 

1.219 

442 

*319 

1,800 


350 
5 64 

421 

1,035 


Women 


213 

iyo 


33 


2, 485 
159 


442 

240 


1,450 

800 

158 

203 


750 
1, 1 H l 
4, 859 
247 
1,106 


6,646 

529 

205 

440 

2,670 


1.816 


MICUlQ^p 

Adrian College 

Albion College 1 

Alma College 1 

Battle Creek College 1 

Calvin College 

College of the City of Detroit 1 

Emmanuel Missionary College . 

HUladale College 1 

Hope College ‘ 

Kalamazoo College 1 

Mary grove College 1 

Michigan College of Mines 1 

Michigan State College of Agriculture at 
Applied Science 1 


1, 784 


815 

584 


120 

445 

191 

100 

210 

1,380 

295 

203 

288 

227 


tin 


9 

2,085 


1 Accredited. 


473 

31 

13H 

601 

730 


259 


265 

299 


27 
148 
1,053 
487 
2, 400 


120 


101 


204 

65 

319 


4, H50 
*275 


Men 


200 

0 

20 

392 

( 5 ) 


120 

40 

1,004 I 


714 
1,461 
2, 142 
320 
1,004 
510 


172 

354 

109 

000 

114 

699 

367 

235 

213 

164 

130 


800 


32 

100 


150 

220 

281 

250 


Women 


1,200 

16 


100 

12 


0 

220 

20 

20 


(*> 
800 
6, 922 
124 
185 


1,545 

C 1 ) 

17 

365 

496 


1,194 


267 


163 

292 


50 

156 

114 

690 

•s 

100 

162* 

- 

25 


40 


9 

2 

160 

60 


Men 


Smdent 
jtorni-t ime 
earnings 
(men and 
Women women) 


16 

15 

75 

100 


10 


1,200 

''o 




Inc. 


2,427 

12 


luc. 


46 


63 

2 

250 


25 ^ 9 

10 i 


74 


200 

65 

200 

48 

114 

79 


40 

72 

38 

100 

28 

349 


18 


33 

5 

0 


150 

20 

20 

5 


1,000 088 

1 No record. 


62 


25 


♦ 


$53, H02 
0 

1,800 

14,780 


710 
Vk 4 SO 
6, 400 


29.000 

22.000 
19.000 
15. 000 


1.085 
200 
10. 480 


bO. 000 

6 


1,200 


0 

37,118 

5,000 

7,250 


SU.OOO 
592. 200 

14 4U) 
18,009 


UH, U00 


1,700 

58,290 

34.000 
26, 000 

200,000 

20.000 
20,000 

6,000 

23, 625 


11.250 

16, :wo 

29. 200 


14300 

04000 

11,400 

3:1,500 

15,000 

C9,OOU 


17.000 

20.000 

15,000 

0 


J 


f 


SELF-HELP 


69 


o 

ERIC 


Table 5. Extent of self-help in colleges and universities — Continued 


Institution 


M icn in an— coni i nucd 


Olivet Col lege 

University of Detroit 

University of Michigan E 


MINNESOTA 


Augsburg College 

Cnrleton College * **' 

College of St. Catherine 1 

College of St. Teresa • 

Col logo or St. Thomas 1 .* 

Concord ia College 1 - 

Uustavus Adolphus College C_ /’ 

1 1 aniline University i " ** 

Macalester College 1 

St John’s University ’* 

St Mary’s Colloge 

St. Olaf College t 

I’ ni versity of M inneso’u e]]”" 


Enrollment, 

1927-28 


Men 


172 
169 
8, M2 


166 

396 


M1SSIS8IT PI 


450 

203 

283 

342 

229 

449 

140 

.5.36 

587 


Belhaven College 

Illue Mountnin College * **”'*”* 

drenada Cullogo 

M illsaps College 1 * 

M ississippi Agricultural and* Mechaninil 

College i J i 393 

Mississippi College * i, ’513 

Mississippi State College for Women 1 

Mississippi Woman's College 1 

University of Mississippi E K>io* 

Whitworth college... 


271 


MISSOURI 


Central College C . 

Central Wesleyan College. _ 
College of the Sacred Heart 
Culver-Stockton (Allege C . 

Drury College 1 

Uindenuood Colloge 1 . ..... 
Missouri Valley College E. 
Missouri Wesleyan College- 

Park College 1 

Hock hurst College 

8t. Louis University » 

Turkic College 1 .. 

University of Missouri 1 

Washington University 1 

W'ehslcr College * 

Westminister College ». 
William Jewell College ‘ 


401 

148 


150 

240 


121 
206 
200 
91 
2, 500 
100 
2.600 
2,250 


MONTANA 


Intermountain Union College 

Montana Slate College of Agriciillure ami 

Mechanic Arts 1 

Montana State School of Mines...]]]]]”" 

Mount St. Charlcc College 

Stato University of Montana 1 ]]] 


NEBRASKA 

Cot nor College. 

Creighton University * 

Dana College. 


1 inane College 1 

Duchesne College. _ _;]]]]]]]]]]] 

Uranddsland Collage 

Hastings College > 

Midland College 

Nebraska Central College 

Nebraska Wesleyan University C 
Union Colloge 


329 

340 


80 

702 

131 

96 

875 


109 

1,685 

84 

119 


Women 


178 


4,415 


78 

420 

315 

451 


217 

211 

238 

23 


473 
4, 528 


106 

309 

180 

160 


35 

210 

290 

220 

206 


452 

204 

86 

114 

234 

467 

183 

345 

220 


500 

175 
1.350 
1, 151 
157 


180 


98 

280 

35 


1 Accredited. 


107 
484 
170 
40 
303 
240 

•No record. 


700 


90 

806 

44 

108 

110 

84 

400 

230 

70 

$ 


Self-help 

students 

Students earn- 
ing ODtire way 

Student 
term-time 
1 earnings 

1 Men 

Womer 

1 Men 

W’ornei 

(men and 
3 women) 

45 

16 



45. 620 

101 


42 


\JSAJ 

in im 

3,090 

500 

1,228 

141 

- II/, l w 

298,200 

0) 





. 200 

80 



20,000 


06 

1 

5 


(') 




157 

6 


•! 15,700 

2,400 
1 16,900 

24 

169 

( s ) 

18 

75 

113 

2 

41 

195 

75 

116 


10 

, io.joo 
0,000 
2,100 

37, 500 
500, 700 * 

21 


6 


214 
5, 007 

71 

1,811 

75 

3,034 

50 

815 


40 



3,200 

16,500 

2,000 

37,000 

35,060 
5 inn 


130 


3 

a 

33 


10 

150 

100 


400 


115 


51 




140 



u, JW 
10,000 


(>) 


i 

65 

‘18 



i 1,500 

4,250 

2 

49 



100 

no 



37 

15 

(•) 

0 

0 

7,050 

50 

25 



5,000 

18,270 

53 

34 

80 

4 

2 

( V ) 





(') 





175 

3 

175 

35 

3 

15 

100,000 

375 

25,000 

250 

50 


25 

(’) 



1,800 
57 6 

200 

222 

24 

300 

. 19 

35 

7 

A 

400,500 

27,454 

72 

29 

- JL 

20,000 
in nnn 

100 


«• 





ivl| VA/U 





N 

75 

60 

40 

20 

21,000 

3.50 

120 


35 

57 

6 

35,000 

72 


6 


'“3,566 

67,400 

674 

308 

262 

63 

44 

38 . 



4,400 

58,800 

2,300 

10,636 

Q 

588 




23 

60 

11 

20 

0 

16 

5 

8 

1 

0 

31 

400 

65 

31 
250 
20 . 

13 

100 . 

1 

. (0 

7,600 

120,000 

6,500 

a, 312 

9 

9 

100 . 

5 

2 

130 

100 . 



50,000 


1 1nclusive, 


o 

ERLC 


70 SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Table 6. — Extent of self-help in colleges and universities — Continued 


Institution 


! Enrollment, 

Self-help 

Students earn- ! 

1927-28 

students 

ing entire way , 


Mon Women 


NEBRASKA — COn' ilMird 


Universit y nf Nebraska 1 

University nf Omaha 

York College 


NEVADA 

University of Nevada *. .. 


new nAvrsniKR 


Dartmouth College 1 

fit. Anselm’s College 

University of New Hampshire ». 

NEW JERSEY 


3. ItKTi 

370 

ill 


582 


2, 263 
HI 2 

1, 140 


College of St. Kliiabeth * 

Georgian Court College 1 

Princeton University *_ 

Rutgers University 1 

8eton Hall College 

Btevens Institute of Technology 
Upsala College 


NEW MEXICO 

College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts ! . 

New Moxlcdschool of Mines 

Univorslty of New Mexico 1 ! 


NEW YORK 


2,448 

1,211 

1M 

446 

168 


204 

76 

359 


311 


700 

3M 

m 


20, 124 


7, 530 
2, 182 
4,430 


1,398 

424 

302 


Adelphi College 1 ... 

Alfred University *_ :. 

Barnard College 1 

Canisius College 1 

Clarkson Collego of Technology 1 

Colgate University * 

College of Mount Si. Vincent *.. 

Collegeiof New Rochelle * 

College of the City or New York 

College of the Sacred Heart 1 

Columbia University 1 

Coopjk Union 

Cornell University * 

D’Youville College 

Elmira College ■ 

Fordham University * 

Hamilton College ». r 

Hobart College * ' 

Houghton College.. 5 M40 

nunter College (New York City)* , 

Keuka College *__ ' 

Manhattan College 1 ., 610 

Marymount College * 

New York State School of Forestry 

New York University 1 .» 

Niagara University * . 

Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn 1 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 1 . 

Russell Sage College 

8t. Bonaventure’s College 1 

8t. Francis College... i 

8t. John’s College * 

8t. Joseph’s College for Women.... 

8t. Lawrence University 1 

81. Stephen’s College 1 

Skidmore College » 

Syracuse University 1 

Union University * 

United States Military Academy > ] 1,259 

University of BufTalo * 432 

University of Rochester ■ 

Vasaar College* 

Weils College ‘ 

William Smith College * 1 

1 Accredited. 

• No record. 


352 

1,443 

328 

432 

1,460 


2,247 

758 


503 


2, 65t 
532 
140 


i\X 


490 


302 

150 


earning* 


1.026 


95 


93 

4 

388 


600 

162 

1,020 

345 


550 
762 
6,633 
174 
7, 744 
476 
1,388 
220 
596 


140 
3, 000 
246 


135 

1,440 


343 

68 


268 

282 


551 

1,704 


410 

443 
1, 145 
242 
154 



1 

Women 



ion and 

Men 

Men 

Women 

women) 

:t68 

491 

164 


$46, non 

146 

103 

135 

i m 

22,518 

35 

27 

10 

i 

12, 360 

125 

1,013 

75 

145 

200 

62 

6,000 
200 , onn 



855 

245 

5 

10 

3 

184; 600 


0 


0 

0 

525 


42 

150,000 
47, .VO 
0 

475 

L r iO 

25 

0 

0 

(•) 

95 


0 



25 

15 

0 

35,000 

71 

14 

40 

18 

7, ion 

19 


2 


4,000 

32,400 

79 

41 

W 

12N 

34 

13 


233 

m. 

io 

23.300 


300 

265 

745 

mjr,< 

25 

30,000 
85, MV) 
149,000 





60 

6 


(0) 

6, 63,3 
0 


0 

(») ' 

15, 493 

14,274 

6,633 

0 

0 

3.600 

(») 

(>) 

1,500 

753 

387 

360,000 





154 


3 



105 

■?** 

25 

13,000 

(») 

45 







4, 500 

150 

94 


25 


22,500 

94 

16 

10 

35,000 


1,500 



118,635 


82 


20 

12,500 

60 

5 

6,000 

0 


0 

0 

1,50 




15,000 

824 

(«) 

123 

824 

701 

< ; ) 

164.900 


43 


12,300 

400 



40,000 

25 



67 

'70 

225 

9 


6, 700 


10 


40, H00 


75 


22,500 

0 

0 

6 

(*) 

42 






4 


4.200 

105 

GU 




1,871 

408 

73 

785,775 

250 

0 


10 


35,000 


0 


0 

259 

(') 

40 

20 

3 

25,900 

250 



26,200 


60 

<‘) 




-4 




* Students all live at home. 

1 Complete statistics not available. 


7 Inclusive. 


zl 


A 


SELF-HELP 


71 


O 

ERLC 


Table 5. Extent of self-help in colleges and universities — Continued 


Institution 


NORTH CAROLINA 


Atlantic Christian College 

Belmont Abbey College 

Catawba College " * * 

Chowan College 

Davidson College 1 *]”* 

Duke University i ..V 

Finn College > 

Flora MacDonald College ! ^ 

Oroensboro College for Women 1 

Guilford College » 

l-enoir* Rhyne College 

Meredith College 1 

North Carolina College for Women » 

Nort h Carolina State College of Agriculture 

ftDd Engineering 

Queen's College. 

St. Oenevievc’s College 

Salem College i_ " 

University of North Carol in a «... 

Wake Forest College > 


NORTH DAKOTA 


Jamestown College 1 

North Dakota Agricultural College ». 
University of North Dakota » 


OHIO 

Antioch College 1 

^Ashland College. 

Baldwin-W'allAoe College * 

BlufTton College 

Capital University 1 

Case School of Applied Science >. 

Cedarvllle College 

College of the Sacred Hoart 

College of W'ooetor * 

Deflanoo College 

Denison University 1 

Findlay College 

Hebrew Union College 

Heidelberg Unlvorsity 1 

Hiram Colltge » 

John Carroll College » 

Kenyon Collogo i 

Lake. Erie College • 

Marietta College i 

Miami University i 

Mount St, Joseph College 

Mount Union College ‘ 

Muskingum College ‘ 

Notre Dame College 

Oberlin Collide » 

Ohio Northern University 

Ohio State University » 

Ohio University » 

Ohio Wesleyan University » 

Otterbeln College 

Oxford College for Women 

Rio Grande College 

St. John's University 

8t. Xavier College * 

University. of Akron ■ 

University of Cincinnati * 

University of Dayton ‘ 

University of City of Toledo 

W estern Collogo for W omen » 

Western Reserve University L.. 

W ilmington College 

W ittenberg College » 


OKLAHOMA 

Catholic College for Women 

Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical 
College * 


Enrollment, 
• 1927-28 


Men 


85 

37 

130 


630 

283 

m 


vo 

127 


1,511 


2 . 624 
714 


234 

730 

1.067 


501 

280 

227 

121 

275 

627 

75 


3 H 8 

137 

446 

121 

115 

234 

149 

305 

262 


250 

873 


306 

425 


713 
792 
7. 108 
1,045 
800 
239 


1,705 

580 

560 


1 Accredited. 


2,442 

•No record. 


Women 


99 


140 

162 


375 

205 

268 

391 

150 

163 

545 

1.698 

8 

370 

53 

295 

120 


286 

326 

644 


189 

360 

234 

97 

164 



106 

70 

514 

121 

428 

106 


192 

161 


201 
145 
901 
84 
217 
475 
90 
956 
•410 
3,075 
1,166 
916 
297 
129 
178 
232 
17 
439 
3,617 
128 
244 
380 
1, 557 
710 
430 


120 


} 833 


— ' — — i 

Self-help [•frdentseam- o hlf ,. nf 
students 1 T^entlre way 

earnings 
(men and 


Men 


20 


0) 


20 


75 

185 

3,5 


115 

50 


504 


8.50 

450 


128 

557 

640 


480 

140 

1,56 

50 

230 

438 

12 


291 

65 

300 

50 

37 

95 

104 

200 

76 


120 

305 


168 

30 


300 

iOOO 

% 

80 

--i 

10 

100 

36 

226 

3,630 

22 

(0 


1,347 

55 

376 


•732 


Women 


17 

25 

61 

2 

100 

24 

220 

(*) 


(») 


128 

83 

193 


166 

60 

69 

25 

60 


115 

2 

257 

30 

150 

30 

1 

35 

96 


(■) 
32 
* 40 
7 

200 


600 


•1 

63 

19 


Men 


15 


W'omen women) 


$2 , 000 


10 


2.000 
4,500 
12 . 500 
24.500 
12.000 
7 . 455 
300 
9,000 


57 


210 

50 


396 


20 

75 

20 

0 

6 

15 

100 

1 


'no 

2,200 

0 


87 


o 


146 


40 


1,065 

*70 


3 

8 

6 

101 

41 

0 


269 

60 


50 


19 . 750 


50,400 

7,840 


397 
127 . .500 
20.000 


12,800 

253.000 

64.000 


219,812 

14.000 
16,600 
10.350 

27.000 
43.800 

4,050 


29.100 


17.000 

6, 100 

12 , 160 
23,400 
14.880 

20.000 
7,600 
4,800 

38, 360 
50,727 


6 

Inc. 


12* 


O 

r . 


65 

0 


10 


16.800 

3,000 


30,000 

366,666 


90.000 
9,000 
l, 975 

14.800 

18.000 
3,600 


1 , 300.000 

2,440 


8,319 

134,700 

6,600 

. 79,600 


• Complete statistic* not available. 


139,200 


72 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


Table 5 .- — Extent of self-help in colleges and universities — Continued 


Institution 

Enrollment, 

1827-28 

Self-help 

students 

Students cam- 
mg entire woy 'j 

Student 
erm-lime 
earnings 
(men and 
wonen) 


Mod |\ 

V omen 

1 

Men |i 

Aomen 

1 1 

Men Women 

Oklahoma— continued 

’ r 

i 




1 

1 




332 1 

466 

(») 

9 

I 



Oklahoma City University 

031 1 

700 

487 

350 

300 ! 

100 

$285. 570 

C » L- 1 a h r» m a P’otlrsTO for WnTUrf^fi 1 


805 


125 


40 

. 12. 500 

Phillips University 1 - 

328 j 

651 

Ilf : 

330 

30 

14 

24.600 ; 


3, 207 

1.696 

1,763 1 

424 



1 16. 300 

University of Tulsa 

175 . 

220 

130 | 

55 

80 

30 

13.000 

OREGON 





m 



Albany College — 

65 

43 

62 ! 

41 f 

29 

9 

22,532 

Linfleld College 

141 

140 

107 L 

0T 62 

41 

9 

10. <00 

Oregon Agricultural College 1 - 

2.290 

1. 130 

2.133 P 

5*3 

1,166 

229 

45.000 

Pacific College * ‘-.V 

88 

120 

• W 1 

37 ; 

18 

12 1 

5.0U0 


107 

105 

27 ! 

21 


1 

6. 600 

tf toed C olloge 1 \ • 

102 . 

159 

97 

9.5 

25 , 

22 i 

9, 700 

\lnivprsity of Oregon 1 . . *. 

1,673 1 

1,370 

1.252 

41S 


172 

8< , 600 

Willamette University ». .1 % 

30b 

306 

200 

£0 

50 

15 

40,000 

PENN*r^ANlA 


f 






AlKrlahrt PnllfMTA 1 . _ . _ 

150 

117 

21 


3 


4. 108 

A llciohan v PnllAVA • 

370 

222 

150 

36 



15,000 


a.. 

450 


25 


11 




498 


* 74 




Bucknell University 

m 

416 

200 

76 

50 

16 

35.000 

Carnegie Institute of Technology 1 

1.673 

797 

1,200 

150 

167 

31 

74, 11 < 

Cedar Crest College for Women 


188 


14 


0 

2, H00 

nirlrintnn PnllAffA 1 .. 

433 

141 

144 


25 


14.000 

DroTAl InctilnLn _ . . 

763 

635 

200 

160 



36.000 

tlrnnwA-TnllAffA 

50 

16 

40 

12 



4,000 

Duquesne University of the Holy C host — 

2,782 

580 

1,328 

203 

1.124 

180 

1. 700. 360 


185 

268 

4 

5 



4<XJ 


650 


200 


12 


20,000 


290 

234 

14 

11 



1, 4dn 

nAttvshurD PnllAffA A __ 

558 

,iJr 

55 

7 



5.500 

flrni’n f'ifv PnllAffA l 

309 

75 

20 



16, .500 

Maverford College * . * * 

273 


100 




10,000 

Irtlnif f'nllnffA 


99 


2 



400 

Juniata College 1 

351 

452 

25 

40 

0 

0 

2.500 

U-Afeypt tp College * . 

1,088 


175 


20 


62, 500 

Ue Halle College 

98 


50 


20 


5,000 • 

Xebanon Valley College* 

278 

305 

8 

3 

6 

3 

800 

1 Ahiffh 1 Tnimrtit v 1 _ _ _ 

1, M8 


165 


20 


33,000 

Marvwnml PnllAffA 1 

500 

j 

0 


6 

0 









Unravlftn PnllAffA 1 

,H0 






900 


155 


3 




MnhUnhArff PnlliKm 1 

T 455 


(*) 




t 

Pannavlvania PnllAffA for W omen 1 


346 



2 


Ptnnerlvanla Mllitnrv PAUftffA 

175 


(i) 




A DU LAO J V UlAiU IVI All HU J 1 tl - -••*-*•* » 

PenoaylcAnla State College * . . _ 

1 ■ • 

3,300 

520 

650 

100 

65 

10 

127, 800 

Pennsylvania State Forest School ...... 

10Q 


8 


3 


800 

Rnwmnnt IVtllnffA 


88 


(») 





258 


15 


10 


3,000 

ftf Tnaenh’s College * 

* ♦ 212 


100 




10.000 r 

at Vincent PoIWa i » 

231 


(*) 





Seton Hill College for Women 


266 

30 



6,000 

flnmiiAhnnnA tTnlmnltV 

255 

163 

13 

A 




8 war then ore College 1 - 

• 283 

277 

80 

25 

0 

0 

id, 600 

Tempi* University 1 

6,504 

4* 454 

4 AM 

2.129 

2,804 

L, 964 

736,000 

Thiel COlltee 1 

134 

110 

(») 




IlnivAnltv nf PannrdonlA 1 

8,709 

8,709 

L, 718 


924 


476,515 

University of Pittsburgh U 

4, 985 

1, 757 

2,000 

O 



140,000 

Urstnus College 1 .j.j 

215 

173 

76 

15 

6 

2 

16,000 

Villa Marla CfoUm 


117 


0 


0 

0 

VUlanova College 1 

705 

V 

40 


0 


10,000 

W a*h 1 rttrl nn «nn I«fTennn PoIInta 1 

504 


126 

- - k 



12,000 

Wayneeburg College.... 4. 

170 

Id? 

127 

10 

69 

3 

12,700 


250 

- 257 

Q) 





Wlleon College » t . 1 

fuo 

40 


0 

3,700 







V 


<* RHODE ISLAND 








Ttroarn TTnlverettv l 

1,301 

• 452 

257 


♦ 

* 

' 1 11,000 

PhvfMAnM Collftfe 

a 035 

DO 

200 


g'" 1 10 


20,000 

Rhode laland State College 

J 403 

121 

» 

il 


6 

7,000 


9 IxUAU'J OWIHJ - m ••• »••••-•• | ww v 

iAp*edited, » No record. • Complete AUtistlca not availably , T 1ndoslv*. 

• >» kj* nf* * • V, 1 * * . •' * l ^ ‘ 


3 

ERIC 


SELF-HELP ; 73 

Table 5. Extent of self-help in colleges and universities — Continued 


Institution 


Enrollment, 
m 7-28 


Wen . Women 


MU’Tn CAROLINA 


Anderson College 

Chicora College for Women. . - ' 1711711111 

The Citadel (Military) L i 721 

Ulemson Agricultural College- IIIIlJ 1.128 

Inker College for W omen 1 


80CTH DAKOTA 


Columbu? College 

Dakota Wesleyan University 1 

Huron College '. " 

Sioux Kails (Allege 

South Dakota State College of Agriculture 

and Mechanic Arts i 

Stale Srftrfol of Mines 1 

University of South Dakota ' *11111111111111 i 
Yankton College 1 


TENNESSEE 

Bpthel College^. 

Bryson College. ’***"*'* 

Carson and Newman College 1 

( uQiherland l 1 Diversity " 

King College 

■Lincoln Memorial University.. 

Maryville College 1 

Milligan College ’ *] 

84 iutl) western College i.i 

Tennessee College 

Tusculum College * “ ’ 

Union University **”’ 

University of Chattanooga ». . 

I niversity of Tennessee * 

University of the South 1 [ 

Vanderbilt University * ’ 

TEX AH 

Abilene Christian College 

Agricultural ami Mechanical College of 

Texas i 

Austin College .7 .[**" * " ’ 

Baylor College for Women l..> .. 

Baylor University « 

College of Industrial Arts C : 

Daniel Baker College 

Iloward Payne College 

Incarnate W ord College i 

Our Lady of the Lake College » 

Me Murray College ]' 

Rice Institute * 

81 Edward's College ]***””^‘‘* 

Simmons College * 

Southern Methodist University * [ 

western University i * 

Texas Christian University i 

Texas Presbyterian College 

Texas Technological College „ 

Texas Woman's College 

Trinity University « \ . 

University of Dallas 

University of Texas » * 


100 

143 

209 

53 

883 

298 

677 

152 


53 

87 

221 

m 

120 

223 

208 

118 

319 


9G 

Vo 

218 

1,471 

334 

1,100 


248 

2, 547 
218 


1.214 


120 

388 


185 

839 

148 

700 

1,476 

452 

480 


1,120 


237 

104 

8,600 


Self-help 

students 


Students earn- 
ing entire way 


Men 


L. ! 

|W omen 


Men 


r-ii ( 


325 i. 

244 L 


College of Charleston 1 

ColumhiaVollege 

Converse College i * 

Frsk me College 1 jjf/ 

} urumn University 1 * 507 

Greenville W oman’s College * 

Lauder College. 

Limestone College 

Xewlierry College . . */*’( ^ 

Presbyterian College 1 . ._]]** 274 

l Diversity of South Carolina >_ . . .. 1 1,016 

Wmlhrop College 1 * 

Wofford College 1 ". * ! | 4, ; *4 

Woman's College of Due West 


82 

348 

470 

38 


436 

1,891 


187 


212 

2S9 

90 

423 

7 

4.53 

109 


83 

63 

335 

95 


193 

440 

98 

159 

189 

102 

?s 

733 


300 


354 


>.£ 
1 , 464 
2,385 
180 
455 
355 
430 
290 
483 


800 

1,648 

494 

512 

83 

374 

534 

317 


2,000 


* 6 * 1 . 

tz . 


(») 


»j 

, ^256 
558 
326 

257 

170 , 52 

35 
350 


114 


146 

38 

198 

238 

(*) ; 

90 1 


12 

30 

(*) 

60 

<«) 

201 

400 

(») 

111 


25 

181 

100 

(•) 

44 

250 


28 

780 

106 


381 


12 

150 


50 

<*) 

71 

200 

590 

68 

250 


350 

‘34 


60 . 


(») 


Women 


29 


9 

20 . 
9 1 


31 

25 

68 

17 


150 . 


40 

10 

175 


22 


15 


20 

67 71 


144 

27 


51 


50 


9 

25 


133 

C) 


15 
4 V 

35 

134 

52 


. 20 


16 


22 

342 

69 

180 


50 

150 

M 

41 

18 

100 

00 

21 


881 


60 


197 


15 


10 


70 

60 

WO 

34 

9 


75 


••••••% 


25 
00 , 


Student 
term-time 
earnings 
(men and 
*romen) 


W I 

5 i 

0 1 


25 


5 


0 

*3,500 
3, 190 


4, 000 
2, 700 
40,500 
4,810 
2,240 
5,090 
4,920 
4,000 
40,000 


10,000 

3,014 


1,000 

31,400 

58.000 
13,820 

25,307 

23.000 


25,200 


1,818 

2,950 


8,000 


33.000 

28.000 


8,800 

7,175 

6,000 

37.000 

50.000 


6,100 

5,600 


7,500 

55.000 

18.000 

e 

71, 600 
32, 400 

1,200 


2,200 

4,995 


14,200 

22,600 

262,900 

66,600 

88,125 

4,050 

122,000 

8,130 

6,300 


AwdUirf. t-No record, 'f » CcatJfetOTtaUiUca not mD»bl». »tndadw. 


196,000 




o 


o 

ERLC 


74 


SELF-HfcLP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


Table 5. — Extent of self-help in colleges and. universities — Continued 


Institution 


L'TAH 

Agricultural Collie of Utah > 

Brigham Young l diversity 

University of Utah « \ l.'»32 

VERMONT 

Middlebury College «... 

Norwich University 

St. Michael's College 

University of Vermont > 


VIRGINIA 


Bridgewater College 1 

College of William and Mary > 
Emory and Henry C ollege * . . 
Hampden -Sidney College ‘ .. 

Hdmt&College 

Lynchburg C ollege - 

Randolph- Macon College U _ . 
Randolph- Macon Woman's C ollege • 

Roanoke College 

Sweet Briar College » 


Y- 


Virginia Military Irwilute ’ 

Virginia Polytechnic* Institute 1 .. 
Washington and Lee University *. 

WASHINGTON 

College of Puget Sound « 

Oomaga University 1 


W alla Walla College . 
Whitman College 1 . . 
Whitworth College .. 


WEST VIRGINIA 


Bethany College 

Davis and Elkins College 

Morris Harvey College 

Salem College 

West Virginia University 1 
Weeyarkinii Wesleyan College 

WISCONSIN 


Beloit Col 
Carroll 

Lawrence College • 

Marquette University ■ 

Milton College 

Milwaukee- Downer College 1 

Northland College....’. 

Northwestern College 

Ripon College 

School of Engineering 

St. Mary's College » 

University of Wisconsin » 


"olle^t.. 
Ccfflege » 


WTOMINO 

University of Wyoming i 

Outlying pountioiu 
ALASKA 

Alaska Agricultural College and School of 
Mines 


, HAWAII 

University of Hawaii 

PHILirrtNK ISLANDS 

University of the Philippines... 

POITO RICO . 

University of Porto Kloo 


Enrollment 

Self-help i 

Students earn- i student 

m 7- 

■'JS 

students | 

*np entire way l^rm-tun* 







_ 1 earnings 

1 





;(men aud 

Men ji 

A' omeil 

Men ' 

L 

AYmien 

„ I 

Men Women women) 



1 

r 4 I 

t 

195 1 

j 

I 

1 


:na 1 

m 

530 1 




• $53 000 

702 

624 

200 1 

60 1 

30 

10 

25' 000 • 

1. 532 

1, 113 

(>) !- 

1 




278 

254 

(*) 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 ! 

326 . 


35 , 


0 . 

j 

8 , 800 

96 . 


21 


9 


2. lid 

745 

615 

350 

170 

100 

50 , 000 

122 

108 

20 

16 


! 

2, 5© 

672 


87 

8 

: 

i 

8. 700 

340 

60 

60 

A !- 

1 


6,500 

211 


C) 






- XV) 

i:t 




2,600 

nx ] 

124 

72 

19 

10 1 

2 

15.036 

227 1 


39 


10 


14, 000 

l 

832 


83 i , 

. . 1 

27 

21, 100 

258 1 


60 

1 

. 20 V 


12. 000 

J 

441 


20 1 

f , 


1.400 

525 

288 

262 

72 1 

. * | 


26. '200 

2,00:1 : 

108 

1, 219 

1 

'252 


533,312 

712 ! 


0 

: 1 

0 ' 


0 

1,214 | 

49 

541 

U | 

168 

r, 

20,400 

900 , 


45 

1 

10 


18,000 

237 

211 

225 

109 

05 

i 

*22 

02,020 

383 


200 


10U 

i 

60, 000 

i. snet 

1,078 

807 

" 265 



33ll 800 

6, U>t , 

4, 576 

5, 1*27 

1.647 

2^014* 

. 73 2 

2.813, 525 

281 

2K3 

00 

45 



14.900 

290 

255 

206 

87 

42 

is i 

55, 000 

40 

33 

{«) 


1 

i 


11)5 

130 

50 

20 

i 

! 

5,000 

154 

131 

25 

2 

5 I 

! 

2, 500 

82 

58 

12 

3 

6 ! 

3 

3,000 

150 

277 

135 

116 

30 j 

46 1 


1,757 

815 

(•) 


1 

i 


175 

17ft 

75 

2D 

45 1 


19,000 



% 



j 


290 

246 

£00 

30 

18 

4 ' 

11,000 

250 

150 

425 

22 

< 


12,500 

371 

j “I 

75 

50 

10 

5 ; 

35,000 ■ 

2,380 

407 

238 

75 

191 

i 

23,800 

00 

i M 

22 

- 16 

0 

. 4 | 

45,000 


| 418 


56 



1.200 

100 

80 

80 

48 

25 

j *2 i 

20,000 

226 

53 

2ft 

6 

4 

0 


200 

100 

(») 



1 


44ft 


' 200 


10 

l 

63,000 

i&6 


4 



ft, 072 

3,660 

2,138 

712 

750 

250 

213,800 

654 

615 

490 

232 

225 

75 

40,000 

SO 

* 

28 

• 14 

21 

ft 

1,700 

442 

221 

216 

18 

*,2 

4 

21,600 

1,678 

1, 161 

(i) 






w 





404 

637 

21 

45 

18 

86 

3,700 


1 Accredited. 


•Noreoord. 

* 


1 Complete statistics not available. ^ • New. 




Part III. — Institutions of Higher Education 

Introduction 

All institutions of higher education in the United States are listed 
on the following pages. (See Educational Directory, 1928, Bureau 
of Education Bulletin, 1928, No. 1.) For each institution an effort 
has been made to give information in concise form in the following 
order: 

(1) Name of institution. 

(2) Institutions marked with an asterisk (*) are accredited by at 
least one of the established accrediting agencies as explained in Bulletin 
1929, No. 7 “Accredited Higher Institutions.” 

(3) Location. The post-office address and population of the town 
is given for oach^nstitution. Large towns offer more self-help oppor- 
tunities. 

(4) Enrollment of men and women in 1927-28 is next in order. 
Figures in parentheses after “men” indicate the number of men 
enrolled, and after “women” show the number of women students. 

(5) Control is shown after enrollments. (See list of abbreviations, 
p. 76.) State and municipal universities are nonsectarian. 

(6) Tuition next indicated is the minimum rate for the year 1928-29 
generally the fee for undergraduate courses leading to the A. B. or 
B. S. degrees. 

(7) Fees represent the extra charges outside of the tuition rales 
and cover all educational and noneducational fees, annual fixed 
charges, health, atldetic, and library fees. v v 

(8) Board and room expenses are minimum charges for one college 
year of 36 weeks. Somo schools materially reduce t^e cost of living 
by charging on an actual cost basis. 

(9) Minimum expense figures are. largely estimates of the lowest 
entire expense for one year’s residence of 3G weeks. -These figures 
are fair estimates which should cover the necessary expenses of an 
economical student with the exception of travel, clothes, and off-, 
campus amusements. ^Individuals will add whatever amounts they 
expect to pay for travel, clothes, and amusements. 

(10) Curriculum. General courses of study in each institution are 
shown. Professional schools and those within universities are in- 
dicated as follows: Medicine (A) — that is the school of medicine is 
rated by the American Medical Association as a first rank or class A 
school; dentistry (A) — the school of dentistry is rated class A by the 
Dental Educational Council of America; law (A) — the school of law 


31896 °— 29 — « . ^ . 76 



76 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

ERLC 


meets the standards of the American Bar Association; pharmacy (A)— 
the school of pharmacy meets the standards of t lie American Associa- | 
tion of Colleges of Pharmacy. 1 

(11) Additional facts are occasionally added regarding opportuni- 
ties, scholarships, and loan funds. 

All of this information is not readily available for every institution. 
Where any item is omitted, the institution did not give adequate in- 
formation. Back of space precludes printing the great hulk of in- 
teresting material from which these items were selected. 

The arrangement of institutions is by States and under each State 
are five divisions as follows: (1) Four-year colleges and universities; 
(2) independent professional schools; (3) junior colleges;* (4) teachers 
colleges; (5) colleges especially for negroes. 

When any one of those divisions is omitted under any State, there 
are no institutions of that type within the State. 

Abbreviations 
** 

L. I). S. — Latter Day Saints. 

Luth. — Lutheran. 

Mennnn. — Mr n non i to. 

M. E. — Methodist Episcopal. 

M. E. So.— Methodist Episcopal South. 
Morav. — M oravinn. 

M. P. — Methodist Protestant. 

N. Jem. — New Jerusalem, 
non res. — Students not residing in the 

State. 

nnnscct . — Nonsectarian. 

Nor. Luth. — Norwegian Lutheran. 

P. E.— Protest ant Episcopal, 
pop. — |x>pulation of town. 

Prcshy. — Presbyterian, 
lief. — Reformed. 

res. — St udents who reside in the State. • 
rm. — Room for one college year of 36 
weeks, , 

R. C. — Roman Catholic. 

8. D. A.— Seventh Day Adventists. 

S. D. B. — Seventh Day Baptist. 

Swed. Evang. — Swedish Evangelical. 

U. B. — United Brethren. 

IT. Presb— United Presbyterian. 

Wes. Meth. — Wesleyan Methodist. 

* Junior folio?** do not grant d**r**s. hut provide the first two yws of Arts and science courses and 
aometlmas other tralntng. Upon completion of thews two years, a student may transfer to the Junior year of 
a coiled or university iu order to continues work for a degree. The Junior college movement which Is fairly 
now Is gaining headway In many tfHlnm and new publicly -sup port* I Junior colleges are being established 
every Sr Particularly tn California. Kansas, and Teias new Junior colleges are being mado a pad of the 
publlo-s^ool system, whereby local students may pursue two years of college work while living at or near 
borne. Three per cent of all self-belp students are In Junior criteges. 



(A) — Class “A" rating by respective 
accrediting agencies. 

Adv. — Adventist. 

A. M. A. — African Methodist Associa- 
tion. 

A. M. E. — African Methodist Epis- 
copal. 4 

A. R. Prosb. — Associated Reformed 
Presbyterian. 

(B) — Class 41 B” rating by respective 
accrediting agencies. 

Bapt. — Baptist. 

bd. — Board for one college year uf 30 
weeks. 

Brcth. — Brethren. 

Christ. — Christian. 

ch. — Church. 

Cong. — Congregat ional. 

Disc. — Disciples. 

Epis. — Episcopal. 

Evang. — Evangelical. 

Evang. Ab 80 . — Evangelical Association. 

Ev. Ch. — Evangelical Church. 

F. Bapt. — Free Baptist. 

F. Meth. — Free Methodist. 

Holiness Assn. — Holiness Association. 


INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


77 


Alabama 


^ Colleges awl Universities 

*A Inham a College, Montrvallo (850 pop.); for women (RftO); State control: 
tuition, 837 (nonri'8., 801); fees, 830; Ixl. and rm., 8210; minimum expense, 8325; 
offers arts and science^ home economics, and music. 

* Alabama T edgteelinie Institute, Auburn (2,113 pop.); for men (1,433) nix! wo 

men f 117); state control; tuition, 895; (nonres., 8145;) fees, 824; lx), anil rm., 
8222; minimum expense, 8117; self-help opportunities limited; loans and scholar- 
ships are available; a land-grunt college; offers arts and sciences, agriculture, 
architecture, engineering, education, home economics, pharmacy (A) and 
veterinary medicine. . * ’ 

Alhms College, Athens (3,323 pop.); for women (172); M. E. So. control- 
tuition, 8101); fees, 832; Ixl. and rm., 8205; minimum exj>ense, 85f)0; arts and 
sciences. 

* Birmingham-Southern College, Birmingham (176.*0fi pop.); for men (634) and 
women (132);. M. 11 So. control; tuition. 8150; fees. 850; bd. and rm., $300; 
minimum expense, 8500; self-help opportunities, scholarships, and loan funds art: 
available; arts and sciences. 

* l Inward College, Birmingham; for men (470) and women (235); Bapt. control; 
tuition, $60; fees. $42; lid. and rm., $265; minimum exjx'iiso, 8450; self-help 
opportunities; arts ami sciences. * 

*Judse>n College, Marion (2,035 pop.); for women (295); Bnpt. control; tuition, 
?10(); f(Ts, SaO; bd. and rm., $250; minimum rx|x*nse, $450; self-help opportuni- 
ties; arts and sciences, education, home economics, aiuf fine arts. 

'Spring Hill College, Spring Hill* (224 pop.); for men (150); R. C. control- 
tuition, $250; fix's, 8 HO; bd. and rm., $350; minimum excuse, 8680; arts and 
sciences. 

St. Bernard College-, St. Bernard (small pop.); for men (32); R. C. control- 
tuition, $50; fees, 89; Ixl., and rm., 8300; minimum exjiense, 840(1; arts and 
sciences and theology. 

*(' nicer si hj if Alabama. Tnivcrsity (155 pop.); for men (1,800) and women 
(500); State control tuition. $50 (nonres., $S0); fcvs, $!); hd. and rm., $300* 
minimum expense, $1 iM); scholarships, loan funds, Lind self-help opportunities 
are available; arts and sciences, commerce, education, engineering, law (A) and 
medicine (A). / 

llW'tV.s College of A l aba via, Montgomery (43, W4 i>op.); for women (650)- 
M. ]‘j. So. control; tuition, $l>0; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $275; minimum expense, 
$42S; arts and sciences and music. 

Junior College 

Motion Institute, Marion (2,0.15 pop.); for men (02); iioiiHrct. private control’ 
arts and sciences. 

Negro College 

Tatlcflcgn College, Tnlledcga (ff,540 pop.)- for men (100) and women (134); 

™ ^ to,, ^ ru ^ tuition, $45; fees, $11; hcl. and rm.-, $170; minimum expense, 
52L.»; arts and sciences, theology, and music. Scholarships; liaLf pf the men 
and a (piartcr of the women work. 


Arizona 

College 3 and Unloenitla 

'Cnircrsity of Arizona, Tucson (20,292 pop.); for men (1,250) and women 
(/Ml); State control; tuition free (honres., fees, $15; hd. and rm., $300; 

minimum cx^nsc, $550; a land-grant college; scholarships and lohna available; 
arts and sciences, agriculture, commerce, education, engineering, home economics, 
. law, and music. 

Junior Colleges 
<4 

t ^l a J unior College, Thatcher (889 pop.); for men (86) and women (140); 
,• *;• control; tuition, $40; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $226; minimum expense, 
5o(X); majority of students are employed. 

'Junior College at Phoenix (29,063 pop.); for men (128) and women (60); pari 
of public-school system; arts and sclonces. 



78 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

ERIC 


Teachers Colleges 

\ 

Xorthern Arizona State Teachers College, Flagstaff (3,186 pop,); for men (64) 
and women (166). State control. 

Tempc Slate Teachers College , Tomi>e (1,063 pop.); for men (113) and women 
(55S); State control; tuition, free; fees, SI 0 ; bd. ami rm., $225. 


Arkansas 

Colleges and Universities 


Arkansas College , Batesvillc (4,200 pop.); for men (113) and women (05); 
Presby. control; tuition, $100; fees, $40; bd. and rm., $260; minimum expense, 
$500; arts and sciences. 

College of the Ozark * , Clarksville (2,127 pop.); for men (100) and women (160); 
Presb. control; tuition, $00; fees, *33; bd. and rm., $105; minimum cxj>ense, $318; 
arts and sciences; self-help opportunities on college farm. 

Galloway College , Searcy (2,836 pop. 1 *; for women (225); M. E. So. control; 
tuition, $100; fees, $42; bd. and rm., $325; minimum expense, $500; arts and 
sciences, education, home economics, and music. 

Henderson-Brown College , Arkadelphia (3,311 pop.); for men (116) and women 
(167); M. E. So. control; tuition, $100; f<*es, $43; bd. and rm., $285; minimum 
expense, $428; arts and sciences and music. 

*Hendrix College , Conway (4,564 pop.); for men (230) and women (87); 
M. E. So. control; tuition, $110; fees, $83; bd. and rm., $226; minimum expense, 
$443; arts and sciences; loan funds available. 

Little Rock College, Little Rock (64,907 pop.) ; for men (250); R. C. control; 
tuition, $100; fees, $12; bd. and rm., $320; minimum expense, $500; arts and 
sciences and pharmacy. 

♦ Ouachita College , Arkadelphia (3,311 pop.); for men (187) and women (177); 
Bap\. control; tuition, $100; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $285; minimum expense, $500; 
arte and sciences, fine arts, and music. 

* University of Arkansas , Fayetteville (5,362 pop.); for men (1,045) and women 
(509); State control; tuition, free (nonrea., $30); fees, $35; bd. and rm., $270; 
minimum expense, $350; a land-grant college; many opportunities for employ- 
ment; arts and sciences, agriculture, education, engineering, law (A), medicine 
(A), home economics, and music. 

Independent Professional Schools 

Arkansas Law School , Little Rock (64,997 pop.); for men and women; State 
control; law. a 

St. John's Theological Seminary, Little Rod? (64,997 pop.); for men (67); 
R. C. control; theology. 

Junior Colleges 


♦Central College , Conway (4,564 pop.); for women (238); Bapt. control; arte 
and sciences, education, home economics, fine arts, und music. 

♦ State Agricultural and Mechanical College , Jonesboro. (Information not avail- 
able.) 

Agricultural and Mechanical Collcge % Monticcllo. (Information not 
available) 


Teachers College 


* 


Arkansas Stale Teachers College , Conway (4,564 i>op.) ; for men (326) and women 
(640); State control; tuition, $27; fees, $24; bd. and rm., $180. 


^ N tgro College 

9 

Arkansas Baptist College, Little Rock (64,997 pop.); for men (69) and women 
(11); Bapt. control; arte and sciences and theology; students work, 13. 



o 

ERLC 


INSTITUTIONS OP RICHER EDUCATION 


79 


California 

Colleges and Unioen/tlcs 

« V 

California Christian College, Los Angeles (579,877 pop.); for men (104) and 
women (145)1 Christ, control; tuition, $100; bd. and rm., $360; minimum expense, 
*560; arts and sciences. 1 

•California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (45,354 pop.); for men (619): 
nonseet.; tuition, $250; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $100; minimum expense, $1,000; 
sciences and engineering; loan funds and scholarships. ' 

College o/ A^re Dame, Belmont (619 pop.); far women (214); R. C. control; 
tuition, 5100, fees, $34; bd. and rrn., $350; minimum expense! $600; arts and 
sciences. ’ 

of J hc ° akland ; for women (130); R. C. control; tuition, 

5150, bd, and rm., $550; arts and sciences and music. 

* College of the Pacific, Stockton (40,296 pop.); for men (400) and' women (475); 
< ’' >ntr °j' tuition, $192 ; fees, $60; bd. and rm., $340; minimum expense, 
$o50; arts and sciences, fine arts, and music. 

•Dominican College San Rafael (5,512 pop.); for women (183); R. C. control; 
tuition, $300, fees, $50; bd. and rm., $600; minimum expense, $950; arts and 
sciences. . 

A tan t° rd J ,?, Tt i OT Vnivernty, Stanford University (720 pop.); for men 
(3,028) and women (692); nonsect.; tuition, $255; fees, $78; hd. and rm., $324- 
minimum expense, $879; arts and sciences, er\gineering, business (A), journalism! 
education, fine arts, law (A), and medicine (A). Loan funds and scholarships. 

Loyola College Los Angeles (579,877- pop.) ; for men (420) and women (20); 
K. L. control; tuition, $200; bd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $600- arts 
and sciences and law. ’ 

i <™*».0akland (216,261 pop.); for women (592); nonseet.; tuition, $300; 

tecs, $64; bd. and rm., $450; minimum expense, $900; arts and sciences. 

r,^y^fi dcn J a {f'^ e iaJf >a r (57°, 877 pop.); for men (340) and women (321); 

nonseet., tuition, $*50; fees, $22; bd. and rm., $450; minimum expense, $750 - 
arts and sciences. ’ ' 

Pacific Union College, Angwin (83 pop.); for men (250) and women (156); 
h. H. A. control; tuition, $100; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $370; arts 
and sciences, commerce, education, and theology. 

Pamdena College Pasadena (45,354 pop.): for men (107) fiatflfcomen (121): 
Nftznrenc control; tuition, $120; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $216; n«#im expense 
5346, arts and sciences, music, and theology. 

'!'™ on ? 2 &T ? mon L i l ’ll H P°p ): for mcn (419) and women (411); 

nonseet., tuition, $260; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $350; minimum expense, $625; 
wt{s and sciences; scholarships and loan funds. t 

j!i7;T*/,°ooT’ c,a remont; for women (52); nonsect.; entire expense, $1,000; 
established 1927; enrollment limited to 250 women; arts and sciences. 

tuitLn*' «fSv S /< ’ <7 « , .n an J' ninC J 8CO (50 Ml 6 pop): for men < 697 > R - C - control: 
tuition, $Io0 fees, $10; bd. and rm., $360; minimum expense, $520; arts anci 
sciences and law. * 

t .*;Z n t C ° U( $h < l a J dan 4 (216,261 pop.); for men (490); R. C. control: 

nntion, $165, fees $55; bd. and rm., $500; minimum expense, $665; arts ancf 
sciences, engineering, comjncrce, education, music, law. 

iecrsily of California, Berkeley (56,036 pop.) and Los Angeles (579,877 

?Km'- r° r "ioe (°> 613 >; Stat * control; tuition free (nonrra. 

*150), roes, $25; bd. and rm., $360; minimum expense, $800; a land-grant college; 
arts and fences. agnoiUture, commerce (A), education, engineering, law (A), 

loan funks P larmac y (A), home economics, music, scholarships 

(9 - 571 P°P->; for men (264) and women (330); 
°u >n * r -° ’ IIO j' *200; fees, $20; bd. ana rm. $287; minimum expense, $496; 
arts and sciences and music; loaf) funds and scholarships, 

Vnivernly of Sonia Clara , Santa Clara (5,220 pop.); for mcn (390)* R C 
oou rol; tuition, $200; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $500: minimum expense, $726: 
vts and sciences, engineering, commerce, and law; scholarships and loans. 




80 


8ELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE .STUDENTS 


*Univeqgily of Southern California , Los Angles (579,877 pop.); for men (4,818) 
and women (3,630); M. 10. control; tuition, 8240; fees, $24; bd. and rm., $429; I 
minimum excuse $957; arts and sciences, engineering, architecture, commerce 1 
(A), education, music, theology, law (A), dentistry .(A), and pharmacy (A). 

* Whit tier College , Whittier (7,997 pop.); for men (221) and women (215); 
Friends control; tuition, $250; feus, $5; bd. and rm., S375; minimum expense, 
$625; arts and sciences. 

Independent Professional Schools 

Berkeley Baptist Divinity School, Berkeley (56,030 pop.); for men (26) and 
women (26); Bapt. control; theology. 

Church Divinity School of the Pacific, San Francisco (508,676 pop.); for men 
(8); P. E. control; theology. 

♦ College of Medical Evangelists, Loma Linda and Los Angeles (579,877 pop.); 
for men (233) and women (25); S. 1). A. control; tuition $230; fees $28; bd. and 
rm., $200; medicine (A). 

College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons, Lor Angeles; for men (lG7)und 
women (44); tuition, $85; Ixl. and rm., $400; osteopathy. 

College of Physicians ^md Surgeons , San Francisco; for men (1S6); tuition, 
$250; minimum expense, $500; dentistry (B). 

<7 olden Gate College, San Francisco; for men (57) and women (2); Y. M, C, A. 
control; law. 

Pacific School of Religion (undenominational), Berkeley (56,036 pop.); for men 
(51) and women (25) ^theology. 

Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry, Berkeley; for men (14) and women 
(4 y t all employed; no tuition; fees, $10; minimum expense, $360; theology. 

St. Patrick's Seminary , Menlo Pjyk (820 pop.); for men; It. C, control; theology. 

San Francisco Low Sclutol, San Francisco; for men (250) and women (25); 
tuition, $145; law; all students are employed. 

San Francisco Theological Seminary, San Ansclmo (2,475 pop.); for men (70) 
and women (20); Fresh, control; tuition free; bd. and rm., $212; minimum ex- 
pense, $242; theology; all students are employed. * 

SoukhiV£.stern University, Ix>s Angeles; for men (1,400); tuition, $200; law; 
students employed, 85 jkt cent. 

Junior Colleges m . 

Junior College ] Bakersfield (18,638 pop.); for men (110) and women (97); 
eitv control; tuition free* bd. and rm., $300; minimum excuse, $350; arts and' 
sciences; most students live at home and the majority are employ'd. 

Junior Cullcgc y Eureka (12,923 pop.); for men (6); city control; arts and 
sciences. 

Junior College , Fullerton (4,415 pop.); for men (153) and women (187); city 
control; no tuition; fees, $10; arts and sciences; students employed, 122. 

Junior College , Hollister (2,781 pop.); for men (29) and women (66); city 
control; no tuition; arts and sciences. 

Junior College, Ontario (7,280 pop.>; for men (119) and women (165); city 
control ; # no tuition; arts and sciences. 

Jumor College , Pasadena (45,354 pop.); for men (342) and women (423); 
city control; tuition nonres., $200; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $.320; arts and sciences; 
students work, 182. „ A 

Junior College , Pomona (13,505 pop.); for men (32) and women (44); city 
control; no tuition; arts and sciences. 

Junior College, Riverside (19,341 nop.); for men (164)‘ and women (159); 
city control; tuition free; fees; $25; bd. and rm., $316; minimum expense, $400; 
arts and sciences; students employed, 175. 

Junior College , Sacramento (65,908 pop.); for men (305) and women (264); 
city control; no tuition ; arts and sciences.* 

Junior College , San Bernardino Valley (Colton — 4,282 pop.); for men (155) and 
women (170); city control; tuition, $10; fees, $40; arta and sciences; studenta 

wprk, 98. 

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INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 81 


Junior College, Sanfa Ana (15,485 pop.); for inrn (ISO) ami woinon (214);, 
rity control; tuition friv; foes, $15; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expciine, $500; 
arts and sciences; majority '4 students work. 

Junior College , Santa Maria (3,943 pop.); for men (37) and women (3S); city 
control; tuition free; bd. and rm., $315; arts and sciences; most students live at 
home. ♦ 

Toft Junior College , Taft (3,317 pop.); for men (40) and women (22); city 
control; tuition free; bd. and nn., $300; students employed, 17. 

Ttachtn Colleges 

Areata State Teachers College , Areata (1,480 pop.); for men (50) and women 
( 1 s:{ ) ; State control; tuition fret'; fcesj$9; bd. and rm., $210. 

Chico State Teachers College , Chico. (9,339 pop.); for men ( 15S) and women 
(425); State control; tuition free; ljd.ja.ud rnf., $250. 

Fresno State Teachers College , Fresup (45,980 pop.),; for men (252) and women 
(97S); State control; tuition free; fees $12; bd. and rm., $350. 

*Snn Diego State Teachers College , Sun Diego (74,083 pop.); for men (280) and 
women (573); State control; tuition free; fees $15; lak and rm., 8313; minimum 
expense $450; men and women employed, 295. 

Son Franrisro State Teachers Collect, San Francisco (508,670 pop.); for men 
(5) and women (1,037); State control ;| tuition free; bd. and nn., $350. 

Sun Jose State Teachers College , San Jose (39,042 pop.); for men (474) and 
women ( 1.2*23) ; State control; tuition free; fees $20; bd. and rm., $315; minimum 
expense, $125; one-sixth of the students are employed. 

Santa Barbara State Teachers i'olU'gc, Santa Barbara (19,441 pop.); for men 
(245) and women (52S); State control; tuition free; fees, $19; bd. und rm., $350. 


O 

ERLC 


Colorado 

' Colleges and Universities • 

t 

*Colnrado Agricultural College, Fort Collins (8,75ft pop.); for men (828) and 
women (359); State control; tuition free (nonrrs. $25); fees, $15; b<t. and rm., 
$325; minimum expense, $175; a land-grant college; sciences, agriculture, engi- 
neering, forestry, home economics, and veterinary medicine. 

* Colorado College, Colorado Springs (30,105 pop.)'; for incu (337) and women 
(291); nonsort. ; tuition, $200; fees, $50; bd. and riu., $350; minimum expense, 
$000; arts anti sciences, engineering, and forestry. 

Colorado School of Minis, Golden (2,181 pop.); for men (353); State control; 
tuition, free (nonius. $200); fees, $75; bd. and rm., $2 NS; minimum e\|>ense, 
$503; engineering. 

Colorado Woman’s College, Denver (256.491 pop.); for women (230) ; nonsect.; 
tuition, $175; bd. ami rin., $400; minimum expense, $575; arts and sciences. 

* Loretta Heights College, Lorctto (Denx-er suburb); for women (185); It. C. 
control; tuition, $150; fees, $22; bd. ami rm., $400; minimum expense $670; 
arts and sciences and music. 

Regis College, Denver (256,491 pop.); for. men (157); R. C. control; tuition. 
$150; bd. nnd rin., $495; minimum excuse, $745; arts and sciences; accredited 
as junior college. 

*l : niversilt/ of Colorado, Boulder (11,000 pop.) j for men (1,<92) and women 
(1,125); State control; tuition, $48 (nnnres. $93); fees, $15; »k 1. and rm., $300; 
minimum exixmsc, $450; arts and sciences, engineering, music, law (A), medicine 
(A), nursing, and pharmacy (A); loans. ...— 

* University of Denver, Denver (256,491 pop,); for men (630) and women (698); 
M. E. control; tuition, $100; bd. and nn., $316; minimum expense, $516; arts 
and sciences, engineering, commerce (A), law (A), dentistry (B), pharmacy. 


Independent Professional Schools 


Iliff School of The-ology, Denver; for men (100) and women (22); M. E. control; 
tuition free; fees, $9; bd. and rm., $262; minimum expense, $300; theology. 

lVe*fmin*(eT Law School, Denver; for mop (123) and women. (8); tuition, $90; 
arts and sciences and law. . — 



82 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS ' 

S Teachers Colleges j 

* Colorado State Teachers College, Greeley (10,958 pup.); for men (332) andl 
women (1,405) ; State control; tuition, $32; foes, $0; I>«1. and nil., $330; minimum I 
expense, $3G(i; loan funds; employed, tnen 240, women 350. £ ; 

♦IKcsfmi State College of Colorado, Gunnison (1,320 ]>op. ) ; for men (145) and 
women (331); State control; tuition, $15; fees, $25; bd. and rrn., $225; minimum 
expense, $285; loans and scholarships; employed, men 75, women 102. 

> Connecticut 

Colleges and Universities 

Albertus Magnus, New Haven H 02,537 pop.); for women (70); R. C. control; 
tuition, $300; bd. and nil., $700; minimum expense, $1,000: arte and sciences. 

Conned tout Agricultural C allege , Storrs (202 pop.); fur men 4353) and women 
(153); estate control; tuition free (non res., $150); fees, $125; bd. and rm., $335; 
minimum expense, $550; a laud-grant college; agriculture, education, forestry, 
and engineering. 

♦ Connecticut College for Women, New London (25,688 pop.); for women (550); 
nonsect.; tuition, $400; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $500; minimum expense, $920; 
arts and sciences; scholarships and loans. 

* Trinity College, Hartford (130,036 pop.); for men (272); nonsect.; tuition, 
$350; bd. and rm., $355; minimum expense, $705; arts and sciences; scholarships. 

'Wesleyan University , Middletown (22,129 pop.); for men (622); nonsect.; 
tuition, $400; bd, and rm., $400; minimum expense,. $S00; arts and sciences; 
scholarships and loans. 

'Yale University, New Tlax-on (162,537 pop.); for men (5,100); nonsoct.; tui- 
tion, $400; bd. and rm., $500; minimum expense, $1,100; arts and sciences, 
'engineering, architecture, forestry, fine arts, music, theology, law (A), and medi- 
cine (A); scholarships and loan funds. 

Independent Professional Schools 

Berkeley Divinity School , Middletown (22,129 pop.); for men (21); P. E. con- 
trol; theology. 

Hartford Seminary Foundation, Hartford (138,036 pop.); for men (105) and 
w r omen (97); interdenominational consol; theology. 

* • r 

* Delaware 

Colleges and Universities 

* University of Delaware, Newark (2,183 pop.L for men (387) and women (311); 
State control; tuition free, (nonres. $150); fees, $87; bd. and rm., $270; minimum 
expense, $517; a laud-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, engineering, 
education, and home economics. 

District of Columbia 
9 \ ■* 

_ . Colleges and Universities 

* American University, Washington (437,671 pop.); for men (97) and women 
(99); M. E. control; tuition, $200; fees, $40; bd. and rm., $600; rpinimum expense, 
$740; arts and sciences and political science. 

Catholic Sisters College, Washington; for women (199); R. C. controf; tuition. 
$160; fees, $24; bd. and rm., $360; minimum expense, $624; arts and sciences. 

'Catholic University of America , Washington; for men (445); R. C. control; 
tuition, $325; bd. and rm., $460; minimum expense, $875; arts and sciences, 
engineering, architecture, theology, and law (A). 

Gallaudct College , Washington; for men (84) and women (60); National control; 
tuition, bd. and rm.. $600; free scholarships of $600 each are available; arts ana 
sciences; Columbia Institution for the Deaf. 

a 



INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


83 


♦ Georgetown University , Washington; for men (2,609); R. C. control; tuition, 
$200; bd. and cm., $500; minimum expense, $805; arts and sciences, law (A), 
medicine (A), dentistry (B), and foreign service. 

*(icorgc Washington University , Washington; for men (3,224) and women 
(2,233); nonsect.; tuition, $210; foes, $10; bd, and rm., $450; minimum expense, 
$800; arts and sciences, engineering, architecture, education, law (A), medicine 
(A), pharmacy (A), and foreign service; scholarships. 

♦ Trinity College , Washington; for women (370); R. C. control; tuition, $250; 
bd. and rm., $500; minimum expense, $850; arts and sciences. 

Washington Missionary College, Washington; for men (152) and women (150); 
S. D. A. control; tuition, $102; bd. and rm., $238; minimum expense, $440; 
arts and sciences and theology. 

Independent Professional Schools a 

National University Law School , Washington; for men (1,100) and women 
(100); tuition, $153; law' and commerce; all Htudents arc employed. 

Washington College of Law , Washington; for men (164) and women (84); 
tuition, $100; law; all students are employed. 

Ntfro Colleges 

* Howard University, Washington (437,571 pop.); for men (1,468) and women 
(669); private control; tuition, $120; bd. and rm., $267; minimum expense, 
$450; arts and sciences, engineering, architecture, education, home economics; 
fine arts, music, theology, law, medicine (A), dentistry (B), and pharmacy (A). 

, Florida 

Collects and Universities 

* Florida State College for Women, Tallahassee (5,637 pop.); for women (1,435); 
State control; tuition free (nonres., $100); fees, $36; bd. and rm., $200; mini- 
mum expense, $236: arts ami sciences, education, commerce, home economics, 
art and music; scholarship^ and loans. 

John B. Stetson University , Deland (3,324 pop.); for men (280) and women 
(346); Bapt. control; tuition, $160; bd. and rip., $300; minimum expense, 
$550; arts and sciences, engineering, music, and law. 

♦ Rollins College , Winter Part (1,078 pop.) 1 ; for men (109) and women (209); 
nonsect.; tuition, $200; fees, $85; bd. and rm., $365; minimum expense, $650; 
arts and sciences and music. 

Southern College, Lakeland (7,062 pop.); for men 035) and women (299); 
M. E. control: tuition, $180; fees, $12; bd. and rm., $315; minimum expense, 
$575; arts and sciences, commerce, and music. 

* University of Florida, Gainesville (6,860 pop.); for men (2,040); State con- 
trol; tuition, free (nonres., $100); fees, $40; bd. arid rm., $176; minimum 
expense, $350; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, commerce, 
engineering, education, law (A), and pharmacy; scholarships and loans. & 

Independent Professional Schools 

St . Leo College, 8t. Leo (100 pop.); for men (70); R. C. control; tuition, $100; 
bd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $500; theology. 

f Georgia 

Collefo and Universities 

•» 

*Agne* Scoil College, Decatur (6,150 pop.); for women (500);. nonsect.; 
tuition, $286; fees, $16; bd. and rm., $400; minimum ckpensc, $700; arts and 
idenccs. . 

Beetle . Tift College, Forsyth (2,241 pop.); for women (322); Bapt. control: 
tuition, $135; fees, $45; bd. and rm., $220; minimum expense, $600; arts ana 
•ciences. 


84 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

ERLC 


Brennu College, Gainesville (<‘>,272 pop.); for women (550) ; nonscct.; tuition, I 
$120; fees, $42; I »«J. and rin., S21K) ; miiiixmiin expense, $510; arts and science, I 
education, homo economics, fine arts, ami music. ! 

* Emory University , Emory University (near Atlanta); for men (1,321) and I 
women (75); M. K. So. control; tuition, $200; bd. ajul rim, $2*47; minimum I 
expense, $5tK); arts and sciences, coiuineree, theology’ law (A), and inediciue 
(A) ; Joan fund, 

* Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta (200, GIG pop.); for men (2,177); State 
control; tuition, $100 (wonres., $175); fees, $27; l>d. and rin., $250; minimum 
expense, $450; general science, engineering, architecture, •commerce (A); coop- 
erative courses; loan funds available. 

'Georgia Slate College for H'omrn, Milledgcville (4,619 pop.) ; for women (1,071); 
State control; tuition, free (mmrps t| $100); fees, $35; bd. am! rin., $200; mini- 
mum expense, $225; arts and sciences; loans and scholarship*. 

Lagrange College , Lagrange (17,038 pop.) ; for women (152); M. E. So. control; 
tuition $90; fees 820; bd. and rm. $272; minimum expense $4N2; arts and science*, 
home economics, line arts, and music. f 

* Mercer University, Macon (52.995 pop.); for men (776); Mnpt. control; tuition 
$135; fees $31; bd. and rm. $189; minimum expense 8355; arts and sciences, 
commerce, journalism, education, theology, law (A). 

A orlh Georgia. Agricultural Colhge , Dnhloncga (6(X1 pop.); for men (140) and 
women (38); State- control; tuition, free; fees, $22; bd. and rm., $150; minimum 
expense, $225; arts and sciences, engineering, agriculture, and commerce. 

Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University (near Atlanta); for men (310) 

* and women (65); Pres I ). control; tuition, $LS0; bd. and rm., $155; minimum ex- 
pense, $335; arts and sciences, commerce, journalism, and education. 

Piedmont College , Demurest (6S6 pop.); for men (109) and women (160); 
nonsect.; tuition, $72; bd. and rm., $197; minimum expense, $300; arts and 
sciences. 

'Shorter College , Rome (13,252 pop.); for women (298); Rapt, control; tuition, 
$215; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $375; minimum expense, $000; arts and sciences. ' 

'University of Georgia , Athens (16,748 pop.) ; fur men (1,282) and women (396); 
State control; tuition, free (nonres. $100); fees, $100; bd. und rm., $180; minimum 
lexpensc, $375; State university and land-grant college; arts and sciences, agri- 
✓ culture, commerce (A), education, engineering, forestry, home economics, jour- 
nalism, law, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine; loan' funds. 

'Wesleyan ('allege, Macon (52,995 pop.); for women (362); M. R So. control; 
tuition, $160; fees, $64; bd, and rin., $340; minimum expense, $5<j0; arts and 
sciences, journalism, education, home economics, line arts, and music; loans. 

t * \ / 

Independent Professional Schools I 

• ** Atlanta College of Pharmacy , Atlanta (200,6 VQ pop.); forfnen (112) and women 

(8); tuition, $125; pharmacy. 

Atlanta Law School , Atlanta; for men (124) and women (8); an evening school; 
q)J students employed; tuition, $96; law, 

* * Atlanta Southern Dental College , Atlanta; for men (364) and women (1); 
tuition, $225; fees, $36; dentistry (A). 

Atlanta Theological Seminary , Atlanta; for men (26) and women (17); ( ong. 
control; tuition, free; minimum expense, $175; theology; half of students are 
employed. 

Columbia Theological Seminary , Decatur (6,l-§0^pon,) ; for men (73); Presby, 
control; tuition, free; bd. and rin., $160; theology; half of students are employed. 

* Medical Department , University of Georgia , Augusta (62,548 pop.): fgr men. 
(137) and women (4); tuition, $100; fees, $10; bd. ami rm., $300; medicine (A). 1 

Southern College of Pharmacy,’ A tlantfCJ for men (64) and women (2); tuition, 
$100; fees, $15; pharmacy. * 

* Junior Colleges 

'Andrew College , Cuthbert (3.022 pon.)f for women (135); M. E. So. control; 
tuition, $72; fees, $2< ; bd. and rm., $297; minimum expense,, $460; arts ana 
sciences; no self-help opportunities. 

'Junior College of Augusta , Augusta. (Information not available.) 



85 



INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


/'"<■'/ Cohh College, Athens (16,748 pop.); for women (100); private control; 
tuition, $1(10, 6d. and rm, , 8450; minimum e\|>eiise, *8600; arts and scicnces - 
no students are employed. \ 

Smith Georgia Agricultural ami Mechanical Cotleqe, ’ McRae (1,37.1 pop); for 
men ( 150) and women (50); M. E. So. control; tuition, free; fees, $45; l>d. and nn. 
$180; minimum espcyse, $225; arts and sciences; students work, 50. 

Young L. (i. Harris ('allege. Young Harris (281 pop.) ; for men (250) and women 
(200i; M. h. So. control; arts and sciences; tuition, $,10. 

1 

Teachers Collects 

Georgia Stale Woman's (’allege, Valdosta (10,7S3 pop.); for women (219)' 
State control; tuition free (nonres. $50); fees $20; l>d. and rm. $189. 

Slate Normal School, Athens (16,748 pop.); for men (1) and women (619) * 
State control; tuition free (nonres. $40); fees $15; lid. dud rui. $150. 


, Negro Colleges 

Atlanta University, Atlanta (200,616 pop.); for men (130) and women (225)- 
A. M. A. control; tuition $56; fees $9; bd. and rm. $193; minimum cxjiense $338; 
arts iincl sciences and education; students work, 100) earn entire way, 05. 

Clark University, Atlanta, for men (100) and women (126); M. E. control- 
arts (pul sciences. \ v 9 

Gammon Theological Seminary, Atlanta, for men (12) ; M. E. control; theology. 

Morehouse College, Atlanta; for men (428); Rapt, control; arts 'and sciences 
and theology; students employed, 385; earn entire way, 250. 

Morris Brown University, Atl\nta; for men (130) and women (84); A. M E 
control; arts and sciences, educu1u>m and theology. 

/W College Augusta; for men (lTfi and women (189); M. E. control; tuition, 
lees, $15; hd. and rm., $144; minimum exjRiisc $220; arte and sciences - 
Cme-sixth uf the students are employed. \ 

r ~ 

Idaho 


Colleges and Universities 

* College of Idaho, Caldwell (5,106 pop.); for men (1G2) and women (233) ; 
1 reshy ; tuition, $80; fees, $10; hd. and rm., $144; minimum expense, $350* 
arts and sciences. ' 

(wading College, Wesleyan ( 1.933 pop.); for men (69) aiul women (138); M. E. 
conlrol; tuition, $90; fees, $20; hd. and rm., $250; minimum exinuise, $400; arts 
and sciences. 

* V niveraity of Idaho, Moscow (3,956 pot).); for men (1,316) and women (849): 
Mate control; tuition free (nonres. $60); fees, $00; hd. and rm., $300; minimum 
cxpmse, $540; a land-grant college*; arts and sciences, agriculture, architecture 
commerce, education, Engineering, forestry, home economics, law (A), music, and 
pharmacy (A). 

Junior Colleges 

nmv I<lh Jt Technical Institute, Pocatello (15,001 pop.); for men (246) and women 
(172); Stale control; tuition free (nopres. *60); fees, $33; hd. and rm., $270; 
minimum expense, $350; arte and sciences, engineering commerce, education 
Dome economics, music, and pharmacy; majority of students are employed. 


Illinois 

• ( 

• ’te ' 

^ Colleges and U nicer sides A 

* Armour ImlUxde of, Technology, Chicago (2,701,705 pop.); for men (694); 
nonwct^-tuitioi}, $250; fees, $15; minimum expense, $700; architecture and 
engineering. 

College Rock )sland (36,177 gfip.): for man (262) and women 
(209); Lutheran control; tuition, $140; fees, $22; bd. and nn, $270 f minimum 
expense, $600; arts and science, fine arts, music, and theology; scholarships. 

j* * ; 




86 


self-help for college students 


| 




Aurora College , Aurora (36,397 pop.); for men (67) and women (65); Adv. I 
Chris. control; tuition. $110; fees, $27; 1x1. and nn., $270; minimum exp-nse, I 
$455; arts and sciences and theology. ^ 

* Bradley Polytechnic Institute, Peoria (76,121 pop.); for men (513) and women I 
(252); nonsect.; tuition, $200; fees, $25; Ixl. and rni., $325; ininrnmm exinmse, I 
$550; arts and science and music; loan funds and scholarships. 

♦ Carthage C ollegr , Carthage (2,129 pop.); for men (139) and women (188); 
Luth. control; tuition, $165; fees, $5; 1x1, and nu., $245; miniimim expense, $500; 
arts and sciences and music. 

*l)e Paul University, Chicago; for men (1,600) and women (400); R. C. con- 
trol; tuition, $250; fees, $10; bd. and rm. ( $630; minimum ex|x*iiso, $750; arte 
and sciences, commerce, education, music, and law (A). 

Elmhurst College, Elmhurst (4,594 pop.); for men (115); Evang. control; tuition,* 
$125; fees, $25; bd. and rm. ( $205; minimum expense, $450; arts and sciences'; 
accredited as junior college. 

* Eureka College, Eureka (1,559 pop,); for men (120) and women (130); Disc, 
control; tuition, $1S(); bd. and rm. f $250; minimum expert* 1 , $500; arts and 
sciences and mu§ic. 

Greeninllc College , Greenville (3.091 pop.); for men (103) and women M45); 
F. Meth. control; tuition, $100; bd. and rm. ( $230; minimum expense, $366; arts 
and sciences, commerce, and music. 

* Illinois C ollege, Jacksonville (15,713 pop.); for men (274) and women (115); 
Preshy. control; tuition, $152; bd. and rin., $255; minimum expense, $450; arts 
and sciences and music; scholarships, 

* Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington (28,725 pop.); for men (356) and 
women (291); M. E. control; tuition, $200; fees, $12; lxl. and rm., $250; mini- 
mum expense, $550; arts and sciences, music, and law; scholarships. 

* Illinois Woman's College , Jacksonville; for women (324);. M. E. control; 
tuition, $200; fees, $35; bd. and rrfc., $375; minimum expense, $010; arts and 
sciences. 


* James MiHikcn University, Decatur (43, SIR pop.); for men (263) and Women 

(326); Presby. control; tuition, $230; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $2SS; minimum 
expense, $578; arts and sciences, engineering, coiiijihtoc, education, home econom- 
ics, fine arts, and music; loans. ■% 

*Knox College . Galesburg (23,834 pop.); for men (380) and women (284); non- 
sect.; tuition, $225; fee, $5; bd. and rm., $315; minimum expense, $600; arts and 
(sciences; scholarships, and loan funds. 

*Lake Forest College , Lake Forest (3,657 pop.); for men (1S5) arid women (10S); 
Presby. control; tuition, $175; fees, $4S; bd. and rm., $430; minimum expense, 
$753; arts and sciences. ‘ * 

t * Lewis Institute, Chicago; for men (2,000) and women (1,000); nonsect.; tuition, 
$240; bd. and rm., $360; minimum expense, $700; arts and sciences, engineering, 
and home economics. 

Lincoln College , Lincoln (11,882 pop.); for men (92) and women (66); Presby. 
control; tuition, $80; fees, $25; bd. and rin., $250; minimum expense, $400; 
arts and sciences and music. * 

Lombard College , Galesburg (23,834 pop.); for men (136) and women (104): 
nonsect.; tuition, $200; bd. and rm., $150; minimum excuse, $450; arts ami 
sciences, music, and theology. ^ 

* Loyola University , Chicago; for men (2 050) and women (2,844); R. C. con- 
trol; tuition, $250; fees, $20, bd. and rm., *360; minimum expense, $1,000; arts 
and sciences, commerce, law (A), medicine (A), and dentistry (A). 

McKcndrre College. , Lebanon (1,883 pop.); for men (179) and women (137); 
M. E. control; tuition, $96; fees, $32; bd. and rm., $252; minimum expense, 
$450; arts and sciences and music. 

* Moyrnouth College, Monmouth (8,116 pop.); for men (292) and women (233); 
U. Presby. control; tuition, $120; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $200; minimum expense, 
$375; arts and sciences. 

Mount Morris College , Mount Morris (1,250 pop.); for men (129) ami women 
(134); Breth. control; tuition, $120; fees, $24; bd. and rm., $208; minimum 
expense, $375; arte and sciences. 


O 

ERLC 



INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


O 

ERLC 


$7 

* North Central College, Naperville (3,830 pop.); for m->n (302) and women (274) ■ 

Evann. rontrul; tuition, $130; bd. and rm, $210; minimum expense, $400' arts 
and sciences and music. 1 

•SfthireMcrn Univermti,, Evanston (37,324 |>op.); for men (1,480) and women 
\ • \' 4 - c, V Iltru lj tm . t,OI b fees, $17; l>d. and rm., $270; minimum 

expense, cujX); arts aim sciences, eiiRiiieeriiiR, commerce (A), journalism (A), 
music, law (Aj, medicme (A), and dentistry (A). 

* *?". Rockford (05,051 pop.); for women (400); nonsect.; tuition, 

5-10, ices, bd. andrm., $3/0; bunimum expense, $000; arts and sciences and 
music; loan funds. 

, ' R " <ar v £.°^c, Forest (4,358 pop.); for women (281); R. C. control; 

tmt.on, $150, fees, $10; bd. and rm., $420; minimum expense, $700; arte and 
sciences* 9 

f rn ' ,r i% X ? r ; cr CofZcfff, Chicago; for women (250); R. C. control; tuition, 
51-U, icts, $1 1 ; bd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $520; arts and sciences. 

St Procopius College, Lisle (223 pop.); for men (255); R. C. control; tuition 

tkcol^v’ X an< rn> " $400 ' n,inimumex P e, ‘ Be - W25; arts and sciences and 

St. Viator College, Bourbonnais (G20 pop.); for men (141) and women (6); 
R, t control; tuition, $110; bd. and rm., S470; minimum expense, $050; arts and 
sciences and commerce; scholarships. 

*Shi/rtlrff College, Alton (2,925 pop.); for men (166) and women (174);Bapt. 
cornrol, t uit ion, $lo0; bd. and rm., $325; minimum exjiense, $550; arts and sciences. 

. Chicago, Chieti^-, for men (15,109) and women (13.955); nonseet.; 

tuition. 8300; bd. and rm., 8C.OO; minimum expense, $800-$900; arts and sciences 
commerce (A), education theology, law (A), medicine (A), and social service! 
scholarships and loan funds. ’ 

n*r«'' r £ f? nf ^T'f' |' r bana ( 10,244 pop.); for men (9,368) and women 
(3.3,0'; Nate control; tuition $50 (nonres. $75); bd. and nn., $l00; minimum 
expttisc, .. 44t> $<0o, a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, commerce 
( \', education, architecture, engineering, home economics, journalism (A), library 
-blJ'glaw (A), medicine (A), dentistry (A), and pharmacy (A); scholar- 

* Wheaton College, Wheaton (4,13if pop.); for men (220) and women (250)- 

nonsed ; tuition $140; fees, $50; bd. iud rm., $250; minimum espense $450, arts 
and sciences and music. * * 

Independent Professional Schools 

inSiOHV lii r lr , ^^’, C i hicftg .° : for J nen ( s 1> fl, "> women (98); Breth. control; 
rtuilciiV^wo'rk^ 18 alul nn > 8l!S5 i minimum exjieiise, $300; theology; all 

C °! U<ir nf °X r0pai, ‘«’ Chica »°: for mcn 019) and woisn (16); tuition, 
empli)\ui ft U ^ nn ’ minimum expense, SG10; osteopathy; half of students are 

512t)"i "u\T KCnt CoUcg * D J Law> Chica «°; for men ( 787 ) and women (31); tuition, 

Chifa 8o; i Tor men 1 1 50) and women (10); tuition, $150; 
j>fl. and nn., $b()0, law; practically all students work/ 

•‘(r/umf Chicago; for men (161) and women (11); tuition, $300; 
n ,V'- / ,, , 40 i m ' ,um " n > expense, $(J0O; medfoinc (C) (rated class C 
rnertu.il Hiliool), half of students arc employed In term-time and 80 per cent earn 
meir entire way. , 

r/mv, (jo Theological Seminary Chicago; for men (95) and women (30); Cong. 
”, ntrol; t uition five; fees, $<-0; bd. and rm.. $450; minimum expense, $640; theology ; 
scholarships and loans available; nearly all students are employed 

SPring ' U! '' 1 W,m W,i ,0r (m,: 

^angelicd Theological Seminary, Naperville (3.830pop.); for men (54); Evan. 
Amo. control; tuition free; minimum expense, $200; theology; scholarships 

a7m pup ’ : ror mro <*“> *" d ™"<» 
\m h '\nw arShaU L<1W Schao1, Ch ‘cago; fi^inen (307) and womeu (20); tuition, 


T 


88 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


McCormick Theological Seminary , Chicago; for men (17G); TYeshy. control; 
theology/ 

• \ nrirrgian-Danish Theological Seminary, Evanston; for men (9); M. E. control; 

tuition free; 1x1. and rm., $310; minimum cx}>ensc, $60U; theology; all students arc 
employed. 

Theological Seminary of The Evangelical Lutheran Church , Chicago; for men (54); 
Evang. Lutli. control; tuition free; minimum expense, $200; theology; scholar- 
ships. 

Junior Collect* 

Blackburn College, Carlin villi' (5,212 pop/;; for men (100) and women (IIS); 
Presby. control; tuition, bd., and rim, $200, including two and one-half hours 
daily service; arts and sciences; a typical self-help college where all students cam 
the greater part of their expenses. 

Broadview College , La Grange (0,525 pop.); for men (lit) and women (159); 
tuition, $10S; fees, $11; hd. and rm., $210; minimum expense, $300; arts and 
sciences and theology; all students are employed through college agencies. 

'Crane Junior College , Chicago; for men (3,000) and women (1,000); city 
control; a part of public-school system; arts and sciences, engineering, and cum- 
meree; employed, men 1,800, women 300. 

r anew Shinier School, Mount Carroll (1,000 pop.); for men (5) and women 
(210); Rapt, control; tuition, Ixl., and rm., $050; arts and sciences; women 
employed, 27. 

'Joliet J amor College , Joliet (38,442 pop.); for men (105) and women (95'; I 
city control; a part of the public-school system; nonres, tuition, $200; arts und 
sciences; loan funds available. 

' Monticell o Seminary, Godfrey (73 pop.); for women (S5); nonsect, private 
control; arts and sciences. 

* Morton Junior College , Cicero (41,995 pop.); for men and women (201); 
public control; tuition, $100; arts and seiners. 

* North Park Junior College , Chicago; for men and women (122); Swed. twang, 
control; tuition, $120; arts ami sciences. 

M\ M. C. .1 . School of Liberal Arts , Chicago; for men (40S); V. M. (’. A. 
control; tuition, $U) per subject; arts and sciences. 


Teachers Colleges 

* Eastern Illinois State Teachers College , Charleston (0,015 pop.); for men (200) 
and women (410); State control; tuition, $75; fees, $20; lul. and rm., $270; 
minimum expense, $290. 

* Illinois State Xormal University , Normal (5,143 pop.); for men (2S0) and 
women (1,01$); State control; tuition, $75; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $2NS; minimum 
expense, $3S7; employed, men 50, women 127. 

Rational Kindergarten and Elementary College , Evanston; for women (574); 
tuition, $250; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $525; minimum e\|>cnse, $7S5; women 
employed, 43. 

'X or them Illinois State Teachers College , De Kalb (7,S71 pop.); for men (90) 
and women (430); State control; tuition, $30; bd. and rm., $210; minimum ex- 
pense, $300; loan funds; employed, men 25, women 37. 

* Southern Illinois State Xormal University , Carbomlale (0,207 pop.); for men 
(S2S) and women (1,721); State control; tuition free (nonres., $75); fees, $15; 
bd. and rm., $152. 

estern Illinois State Teachers College , Macomb (0.714 pop.); for men (190) 
and women (542); State control; tuition, $75; fees, $55; bd. and rm., $234. 

Indiana 


Colleges and Universities 


* Butler University, Indianapolis (314,194 pop.); for men (771) and. women 
(787): Christ, control; tuition, $100; minimum expense, $473; arts and science! 
and theology. 


'De Pauw University , Greencastle (3,780 pop.); for men (889) and women 
(736); M. E. control; tuition, $240; hd. and rm., $261; minimum expense, $600; 
arts and sciences and music; loan funds. 



INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 89 

•Earlham College, Earlliahi. suburb of Richmond (20.765 pop); for torn (103) 

ft TZJc l n 7" is Cl,n,r<>| ; tuition. $200; bd. and r,n , $300- minim! m 
expanse, $000, arts and sciences; scholarships and loans. ' 

Fvanurillc ColUgc Evansville (85.264 pop ); for men (301) and women (361)- 

t]ko L '.iri’ n, M? ! U? ,on ' ?,50 i fcos ’ bd - and rtn., $250; minimum expense' 
rncrco. S<Ucnccs > Migious education, education, and^om- 

* Franklin College Franklin (4.909 pop.); for men (176) and women (133. - 

S20; - 

rc ttsrr ®, 

Jrt'Z X ; ,rlh ManolmHrr '-’.711 |...|0; f..r men (3no> 

i ;^. j *52 

«*>: ,,,Se LS C!W ’ 

expense, $400; arts and scienm; loan funds ’ ,2 *' 5; n,H,,m,,n ' 

iZ'rZe ^SX^lm < { ££* fSs “,?J. Std^rm "S‘ 

=;=. 'SS-C S' ,^£~; 

«SHH£E-^M ,,l - 8i mb 

sp 

M V L^TT'l'- lTp J',‘!, u . 1 I 1 ; 301 f(ir (100) and women (173)- 

ami sciences wul music! * ’ * ‘ ** {4 ! minimum expense, $360; arts 

*1 niecmty nj Indiana, Bloomington (11,595 non)* for m™ n kqo\ „ j 

( .«»); State control; tuition, $65 ,.< nres $1(K)) • fees *[v tit*!?, d 
*252; minimuin exnense «'(«•)• i • • ices, *i&, lid. and rm., 

i'ycsr^ 10 ,ir,; ,uu - 1; - 

co n ! n" f • 7 [ iVitYc m $?oo- (,,213 .£T ): for ,no " (-■ 0^1); R C. 

• 1; * ,; * A> ' >';«rmaey (A), and physical education; scholarships! 

(lSlf;^u,n^ct - tilhllf’ $15^ >H ('eM U .W? p0, J ): for .. ,ncn («!> “nd women 

JfimaeTcA)! 1 ' 8Ci<i, ‘ Ct; ’ *"«Wng. 

S^a. <^ 2 r- ( 



SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

ERLC 


*4 


90 


Independent Professional Schools 



Benjamin Harrison Law School, Indianapolis (314,194 pop.); for men (130) and 
women (12); tuition, $90; an evening school; law. 


Indiana Law School, Indianapolis (344,194 pop.); for men (110); tuition, $150; 
bd. and rm., $252; law; nearly all students are employed. 

*Indianapolis College of Pharmacy, Indianapolis; for men (220); tuition, $200; 
bd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $000; pharmacy (A); students em- 
ployed, 150. 

St. Meinrad Seminary, St. Meinrad (839 pop.); for men (117); It. C. control; 
theology. 

Junior Colleges 


Vincennes University , Vincennes (17,100 pop.); f«>r men (50' and women (115); 
nonsect, control; arts and sciences, education, and music; tuition, $100. 


Teachers Colleges 

Central Normal ('allege * Danville (1.729 pop.); for men (150) and women (135); 
nonsect.; tuition, $78; bd. and rm., $180 to $25?; three-fourths of students arc 
employed. 

* Indiana State Normal School , Muncic (36,524 pop.); for men (547) and women 
(1,028) ; State control; tuition, $45; fees, $0; bd. and rm., $300; minimum ‘wpense, 
$376. 

* Indiana State Normal School , Terre Haute (06,083 pop.); for men (520) and 
women (919); State control; tuition, $36; fees, $-10; bd. and rm., $288; minimum 
expense, $334; 175 men and 133 women are employed. 

Teachers College of Indianapolis , Indianapolis; for women (1,400); nonsect.; 
tuition, $160; bd. and rm., $360; minimum expense, $500. 

Iowa 


Colleges and Universities 

Buena Vista College , Storm Lake (3,658 pop.); for men (121) and women (140)* 
Presby. control; tuition, $130; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $265; minimum expense, 
$480; arts and sciences, agriculture, commerce, education, home economics, 
and music. 

Central College , Pella (3,338 pop.) ; for men (157) and women (140); Dutch Ref 
control; tuition, $100; fees, $5; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, $450; 
arts and sciences and music. 

*Coe College , Cedar Ranids (45,566 pop.); for men (477) and women (442); 
nonsoct. control; tuition, $150; fees, $40; bd. and rm., $310; minimum expense, 
$500; arts and sciences. 

^Columbia College , Dubuque (39,141 pon.); for men (265) and women (38); 
la C. control* tuition, $100; fees, $25; bd, nnd rm., $270; minimum expense, 
$470; arts and sciences. 

* Cornell College , Mount Vernon (1,406 pop.); for men (232) and women (279); 
M. E. control; tuition, $180; fees, $28; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, 
*458; arts and sciences and music; scholarships and loans. 

Des Moines University, Des Moines (1*26,468 pop.); for men (382) and women 
(347); Rapt, control; tuition, $210; fees, $17; bd. and rm., $250; minimum ex- 
pense, $459; arts and sciences, engineering, education, fine arts, and nhar- 
maCy (A). 

* Drake University, Des Moines; for men (750) and women (800); nonsect.; 
tuition, $275; bd. and rm., $350; minimum e\p< •use, $625; arts and sciences, 
commerce, education, music, theology, and law (A); scholarships and loan funds 

Ellsworth College , Iowa Falls (3,954 pop.); for men* (125) and women (325); 
nonsect ; tuition, $120; fees, $16; bd. and rm., $343; minimum expense, $379, 
arts and sciences. 

0 roc eland College , , Lamoni (1,787 pop.) ; for ‘men (130) and women (140); 
L. D. S. control; tuition, $125; fees, $40* bd. and rm., $216; minimum ex pc use, 
$381; arts and wuenccs, agriculture, education, home economics, and music; 
accredited as juufor college. 



INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


91 


*Grinnell College, Grinnell (5,362 pop); for men (347) and women (398); 
nonsoot , tuition, $250; fees, $28; t>d. and rm., $425; minimum expense, $775; 
arts and sciences and music. * 

College of A grintUurc and Mechanic Art*, Ames (6,270 pop ); for 
men <2.7f0) and women (1,024) ; St ate control; tuition, $90 (nonres., $132);bd.and 
rm , $234; minimum expense, $348; a land-grant college; general science, agri- 
culture, education, engineering, forestry, home economics, journalism, veterinary 
medicine; loans. 9 - r 

, Mount Pleasant (3,987 pop); for men (128) and 
women' (209); M L. control; tuition, $60; fees, $90; lid. and rm., $250; mini- 
mum expense, $410; arts and sciences. 

,.i& l n l v Chrr ( ' ollt '9 c ' Cniycniitv Park (361 pop.); for men (115) and women 
(132), Holiness Assn, control; tuition, $100; fees, $30; bd. and rm., $243; mini- 
mum expense, $4/3; nrts and sciences, music, and theology. 

Lena* College, Hopkiuton (759 pop); for men (42) and worrfen (30); Prcsbv. 
control; tuition, $10.>; lid. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $400; arts arid 
sciences, 

*L’dher College Dccorah (4,039 pop.); for men (384); Luth. control; tuition, 
$12.i; fees, $33; bd. and rm., $194; minimum expense, $300; arts and sciences 
and education. 

College Sioux City (71,227 pop.); for men (314) and women 
(400), M b control; tuition, $150; fees, $12; bd. anefcom., $324; minimum 
expense, $5/4; arts ^<1 sciences and music. 

* Mount St. Joseph College, Dubuque (39,141 pop.); for women (300); R. C. 

control; tuition, $100; fees, $15; bd. and rm., $235; minimum expense, $400* 
arts and sciences. ■ 9 

* Parsons College, Fairfield (5,94* pop.); for men (250) and women (250): 

treo ,V ‘ V on ’ tuition, $138; fees, $12; bd. and rm., $248; minimum expense, 
$458; arts and sciences. 

*l'rnn College , Oskaloosa (9,427 pop.); for men (242) and women (395); 
control; tuition, $150; fees, $2o; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, 
jmuu; arts and sciences, commerce, and music. 

f oUf0 J’ DaVC A l in r1 (5G ’ 727 P°P->; for mcn (415); R. C. control; 
tuition, $90, bd. and rm., $219; minimum expense, $409; arts and sciences; 
scholarships. 9 

•Svnpson Cnlkgc Indianola (3,628 pop.); for men (300) and women (350); 
«!ir Ct f n r °j tuition, $100; fees, $(>0; bd. and rm., $252; minimum expense, 
*445; arts and sciences, comniercc, and music; scholarships and loan funds. 

/o*i on/'’ of f mm, Iowa City (11,267 popO; for mcn (3,550) and women 

(2,i90); Mate control; tuition, $00 (nonrcf., $130); fees, $10; bd. and rm., $316- 
minimum expense, $556; arts and sciences, engineering, commerce (A), music! 

scholarships 10 * 110 A ’ j° urna,i8,n llu rsing. dentistry (A), pharmacy (A); 

°f Dubuque (39,141 pop.); for men (130) and women 

(80); Presby. control; tuition, $120; fees, $19; bd, and rm., $300; minimum 
expense, $450; arts and sciences and theology. 

Vnper Iowa University Fayette (1,085 pop.); for men (181) and women (209); 

■ k. control; tuition, $120; fees, $40; bd. and rm., $234; minimum expense, 
arts and sciences, commerce, speech, and music. 

IPartburg Coffey, Clinton (24,151 pop ); for men (79); Luth. control; tuition, 
MU, fees, $19; bd. and rm., $200; minimum expense. $300; arts and sciences. 

Western Union College, Lc Mars (4,683 pop.); for men (126) and women (107); 
Ev^anfc controj; tuition, $100; fees, $25; bd. and mi., $250; minimum expense 
5; Vis and sciences. 

Independent Professional Schools 

Des Moines Still College of Osteopathy, Dos Moines ( 120,468 pop.) ; for men (245) 
and women (35); tuition, $250; osteopathy. ' 1 ' 

Wartburg Throlopiral Seminary, Dubuque (39,141 pop.); for men (74); Ev. 
Luth. control; tuition free; bd. and rm., $180; theology; students employed, 29. 

31596°— 29 7 


> 


92 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 



Junior Colleges 


Junior College, BurlitiRlnn (24,324 pop.); for men (23) nnd women (48); citj 
control; part of public-school -system; tuition, $75; arts and sciences, 

* Junior College, Mason City (20, 0(15 pop.); for men (47) and women (46); 
city control; part of public-school system; tuition, }90; arts and sciences, 

•St. Joseph Junior College, Ottmnwa. (Information not available.) 


•Stole Teachers' College, Cedar Falls (f>,310 pop.); for men (700) and women 
(2,200); State control; tuition, |til> to $!)(); fees, $24; l>d. and rm., $250; minimum 
expense, $335 to $400; loans and scholarships; employed — men, 560; women, 


•Baker University, Rnlilwin City (1.137 pop.); for men (211) and women (237); 
M. E. control; t uition, $130; fees, $15; bd. anil rm., $231; minimum exncnse, *430; 
arts and sciences, fine arts, and music, 

Bethany College, Lindsborg (1,897 pop.); for men (226) and women (335); 
Lutli. control) tuition, $120; fees, $8; bd. and rm., $192; minimum expense, 
$412; arts and sciences and muBic. 

Bethel College, Newton (9.781 pop.); for men (117) and women (1 16); Mention, 
control; tuition, $90; fees, $15; bd. and rm., $200; minimum expense, $310; arts 
and sciences, education, home economies, and music. * 

•College of Emporia, Emporia (l 1,273 pup.); for men (183) and women (197); 
Prcsby. control; tuition, $120; fees, $12; bd. and rm.,$275; minimum expense, 
*500; arts and sciences and music; loan funds. 

+Fnends University , Wichita (72,217 pop.); for men (235) and wumen (2581; 
Friends’ control; tuition, $120; fees, $15; bd..and rm., *240; minimum expense, 
$460; arts und sciences and music. 

Kansas City University , Kansas City (101,177 pop.); for men (52) and women 
(164); M. P., U. B. control; tuition, $1)0; fees, $12; bd. and rm., $234; minimum 
expense, $421; arts and sciences. 

^Kansas State Agricultural College , Manhattan (7,989 pop.); for men (2,552) 
and women (1,330); State control; t uition free (nonres., *74); fees, $60 to $90; bd. 
and rm., $250; minimum expense, $450; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, 
agriculture, commerce, engineering, architecture, home economies, journalism (A), 
music, and veterinary medicine; loan funds. 

Kansas Wesleyan University, Selina (15,085 pop.); for men (349) and women 
(617); M. E. control; tuition, *120; fees, *10; hd. and rm., *225; minimum 
expense, $355; arts and sciences, commerce, and music. 

McPherson follegc, McPherson (4,595 pop.); for men (200) and women (280); 
Breth. control; tuition, $120; fees, $15; bd. and rm., *200; minimum expense, 
$330; arts and sciences. 

* Ottawa University , Ottawa (9,018 pop.); for men (173) and women (232); 
Bapt control; tuition, *135; foes, $15; hd. and rm., $243;’minimum expense, $478; 
arts and sciences and music. 

♦S/. Benedict's College , Atchison (12,63p pop.): for men (303); R. C. control; 
tuition, $75; fees, 130; hd. and rm., *360; minimum expense, $535; arte and 
sciences and theology. * 

*St. Mary's College , St Marys (1,321 pop.); for men (450); R. C, control; 
tuition, $125; fees, $30; hd. and rm., $360; minimum expense, $635; arts and 
sciences; scholarships. * c 

* Southwestern College , Winfield (7,933 pop.); for men (440) and women (908); 
M. E. control; tuition, $137; fees, *18; hd. and rin., *288; minimum expense $457; 
arts and sciences and music; loan funds. * 

* Sterling College, Sterling (2,060 pop.); for men (206) and women (206); U. 
Preab. control; tuition, $120; fees, $5; bd. and mi., $250; minimum expense, $450; 
arts and sciences, journalism, education, home economics, and music. 


Teachers Colleges 


Kansas 


Colleges and Universities 


o 



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INSTITUTIONS OJ HIGHER EDUCATION 


93 


* University of Kansas, Lawrence 62,456 non I* for m«>n n »i<n „„ > 
n -' ,5 " >: tuition, *.% ,L,,“s . $75 ; f£ ^n ^f anH rm IZl 

inM,"no.neNp.n.M« Jintt^irtsan.l sciences, cm, « i nmi n K . .m’it , '1™;!?} ' 

Sri™;:'ru::;L" r,s ' ■»* >■'>■ ■»-»«■« 

MSO; forme, I v F»ir,„„m',l * JW > *“»»»" 

iioiiM-ct-.; tuitionJVlflO; 1 and' riiK,*' $S‘ Suum sS 

nts ami sciences, line arts, music, uud law (A). txpcUi,t ' ^ 4U ‘ 

Independent P rofasional School} ^ 

C1 t v . <•»«.'" !»!>■); for 

‘So .f.V«“!^rUm ';5 S225; 

Junior Colleges 

* “SU'ari SH? 22 £ 

surnocs, students live at home and the majority are employed ’ > 

» arts and siumi'es, all students are tun ployed * 

Clt,J J ' n ‘ lor (Allege, Carden City (3,848 pop.); for men (38) and women 
wiciices/' C ° ntr ° PaK ° f tlie p,lblic ' Bcho ^ aysteui; tuition, $90; arts and 

-&&&&; 8 Marj 2 *r n tor n,cn <««> * ud « <»>«; 

r " r — « “ d — «»! Crusl.y- 

Ui Junior College, Iola (8,5(13 |>o|).); for men (61) and women (07)- dtv con 
tn - part of pub l.e-school system; tuition, $72; arts and sciences. 5 ' ‘ 

1 

Teachers Colleges 

en*n 1< st,o T? rh t rr *i C f l -, 0C ' E * n P?”a (11,273 pop.); for men (497) andwom- 
en (1,10(1), .state control; tuition, $36; fees, $9; hd. and rm„ $261 

ft'B 'S l,!rs *• “" d — . * 

Kcntocky » • 

Colleges and Unioei sUitt 

eed * l> t oft i o n U Ti ' H) ‘ V?!!!’ 0 io'n 15 ? for mo » ( 398 ) ftn(1 women (337); non- 

. . ,l » *1^0 f /tL8 # $2.>; Ixl. ajul cm . , $252; minimum oxixjnKc 

arts and sciences, home economics, fine arts, ifiusic, and theology. 

sect tn?ii C ’ oW ftf‘\ I ^ rca (M> 4 0|>op.): for men (1,117) and women (1,048)- non- 
orin' ! ,n fees, $21; hd. hihi rin., $123; entire exixmBe $244’ nrU Ami 
rues, loan funds and scholarsliips. The college is cooperative in all ita 


O 

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94 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

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earn 


departments and provides 40 different kinds of paid labor to help students earn 
their way. All students are required to do a minimum of /two hours’ work j>er 
daw 


*Centrr College, Danville ( r DO pop.); for men (271) and women (52); Preshy. 
control; tuition, $150; fees, 10; Ini. and rm., $321; minimum i\\|K'nse, $484; 
arts and sciences. * 


*Ge orgetoum College , Georgetown (3,903 pop.); for men (IS5) and women (220); 
Bapt. control; tuition, $135; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $24K; minimum expense, 
$483; arts and sciences. 

Kentucky Wesleyan College , Winchester (8,333 pop.); for men (191) and women 
(187); M. E. So. control; tuition, $00; fees, $74; bd. and rm., $274; minimum 
expense, $500; arts and sciences, journalism, education, and home economics. 

Kingswood Holiness C allege , Kingswood (G7 pop.); for men (49) and women 
(61); Holiness Association control; tuition, $35; fees, $5; bd. and rm., $144; 
minimum expense, $250; arts and sciences and theology. 

Ogden College , Bowling Green (9,038 pop.); for men (161); nonsect.; tuition, 
$50; fees, $33; bd. and rm., $200, minimum expense, $350; arts ami sciences. 

St. Mary's College, St. Marv (149 pop.); for men (90) and women (20); K. C. 
control; tuition, $50; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $3 j 0; 
arts and sciences; scholarships*. 

* Transylvania College , Lexington (41,534 pop.); for men (17*1) and women 
(164); nonsect.; tuition, $102; fees, $5; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, 
$452; arts an^l sciences and theology. 

Union College , Barboiirvillc (1,877 pop.); for men (146) and women (145); 
M. E. So. control; tuition, $70; fees, $16; bd. and rin., $180; minimum expense, 
$266; arts and sciences. 

* University of Kentucky , Lexington (41,534 pop.' ; for men (1,719) and women 
(8 f 66); State control; tuition, $40 ( non res., $'55} ; fees, $20; bd. and mV, $360; 
minimum expense, $425; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, 
commerce (A), education, engineering, home economics, and law (A); loan funds. 

* University of Louisville , LouisviUe (234,891 pop.); for men (8tK)) and women 
(418); city control; tuition, frei'^ranrcs., $150) ; bd. and rm., $331; minimum 
expense, $405; arts and scicnces/iiuginecriug, law, medicine (A), and den- 
tistry (A). • * * 


Independent Professional Schools 


k 


* * 


I 


i 


Jefferson School of Law , Louisville; for men (154) and women (8); tuition, $100; 
fees, $50; bd. and rm,, $000; minimum expense, $850; half the students earn 
their Entire way; law. \ 

* Louisville College of Pharmacy , Louisville; for men (95) and women (2); 
tuition, $160; minimum expense, $300; pharmacy (A); two-thirds of students 
are employed. 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary , Louisville; for men (84); Preshy. control; 
tuition free; minimum expense, $160; all students arc employed; theology. 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville; for men (440); Bapt. con- 
trol; tuition free; minimum expense, $320; theology; half of students are 
employed. 

•4P Junior Colleges 

Bethel College , Russellville (3,124 pop.); for men (105) and women (11); Bapt 
control; tuition, $90; fees, $18; bd. and rm., $255; minimum expense, $363; 
arts and sciences and education; a third of students are employed. 

Bethel Woman's College, Hopkinsville (9,696 pop.); for women (182); Bapt. 
control; tuition, $110; bd. and rm., $300; minimum c\|>ensc\ $410; arts anil 
sciences; loan funds are available; 10 per cent of the students are employed, 

Cumberland College , Williamsburg (1,767 pop.); for men (35) and women (43); 
Bapt. control; tuition, $45; arts and sciences. # # * \ 

Hamilton College for Women , Lexington (l\,534 pop.); for women (U6 n 
nonsect.; tuition, $150; bd. uud rm,, $450; minin$um expense, $375; arts and 
Sciences. 

Logan Female College , Russellville (3,124 pop.)j for women (105); M. E So. 
control; tuition, $95; arts and sciences, education, home economics, fine arts, 
and music. 



o 

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INSTITUTIONS OF JIKIIIER EDUCATION 


95 


Siiznrtlh Junior Colli qv, Nazareth (near Bardslown, 1.717 pan.); for women 

( ; Vr,„ 1 '.' ,, " ,r " 1; I«I- and rm, SUM); minimum 

excuse, *o00, :irl.\und .sciences, education, home economics, and mhimc. 

Stirred Heart Junior College, Louisville, for women <1201: R. ('. rontrop 
tuitinii, $90; arts and sciences; no self-help oppurt unities. 

Sill III nnitt Memorial Sclioiil, London (1.707 pop.,; for men Cl',) and women 

< * * > •'! L * s °- tuition *05; arts and sciences, educ.ition, and home 

economics. y 

\' ilia M mlnn mt College, Covington (57.121 pop.) ; for women (4P; R. C. control- 
arts and sciences. 1 

* Tcichcrs Colleges 

Foster; Knit arky State Xormal School ami Tt ot hers College Richmond 
!".(>, ; r. ,r men I -1 10) and women 1 1,053'; Stale r. /trot; initio'n free tnonn-s. *3(f)~ 
I'd and rut., SI SO; miniiinmi expense, *250. ' 

Shift ormnl~ School ami Teachers <’ollnj < , Murray (2,415 pnjO; fW men (250) 
und women (570); State control; tuition free monies.. *3t0; bd and rm S1S0‘ 
luinitnimi expense, *250. *' * 

'Western Kentucky State Teachers Cnlltgc, Bowling (been (9,(i3S pop.)- for 
men l51t>) aird women (l,4tiS); Slate emit ml; tuition free (iionres., *3tp ; bd 'ami 
rm., SlSO; luiniiinim expense, *25th 

Negro Colleges 

Simnoris Vtnrcmh /, liouisville; for men (02) and women (IS); Bapt. control* 
tuition, S to; fees, $8; 1.x l- and rm., SU>7; arts and sciences and theology. 

Louisiana 

Colleges and Universities 

'Centenary College, Rhrcveporl (43.874 pop.); for men (325) mid women (21.3) • 

So - c " , ' tro . 1 ; I.'idum, *1 SO; fees, $0; l,d. and rm., *270; mininfiun expense,’ 
5o5t); arts and sciences. - 

Jiff I r si >n College, Convent f 375 pop.) ; for men 050); R. C. control; t nil ion. *90- 
nd. and rm., *2ti0; minimum expense, $350; arts and sciences. 

* Louisiana ('allege, Pincvilie* (2. IKS pop.'; for men (23(11 and women (1901* 
control; tuition, S120; fees, *10; lid. mu! rm., $207; minimum expense, *307 1 
arts and sciences., 1 

Louisiana *hlate l rntrrsUjj and Agricultural and Mechanical College Baton 
Koqtfe (21.782 pop.); for men (1,239) and women (473); State control;' tuition 
tree; lees, *39; bd. and rm., *247; minimum expense, *371; a land-grunt college: 
arts and sciences, agriculture, education, engineering, home economies, forestry 
law (A), music, and journalism (A). * 

Loyola Vnircrsitg, New Orleans (3S7.219 pop.); for men (142) and women (31)- 
2:2 e, C, i , i* r ' ,I; <ul,i,in - *KH>; fees, *('.7: tut. and rim. $270; minimum expense! 
»d/0 to *470; arts and sciences, law, dentistry (A), and pliarniacy (A). 

Mansfield Female College, Mansfield (2.504 nop.); for women (13*) ; M. E. So. 
control; tuition, *90; fees, *22; lul. and rm., $200; minimum expense, 4372; arts 
and sciences. 

A 

'Southwestern Louisiana Institute, Lafavcttc (7,855 jmjv) ; for men (319) amt 
women (501); Stale control; tuition free; fees, *18; lid. und rm., *230; minimum 
expense, *300; arts and sciences, agriculture, home economies, commerce, educa- 
tion, and engineering. 

'Tulane Univirsiiy, New Orleans (387,219 pop.); for men (1,800) and women 
(olOi; nonsect.; tuition, *125; fees, *40; hd. and rm., *320; minimum expense, 
»5M»; arts nnd sciences, engineering, arcliitcel nr**, commerce (A), education 
fine arts, music law (A), medicine (A), and pharmacy (A); 11. Sophie New- 
comb Memorial College for Women. 

Junior Colleges 

Stllimttn College, Clinton (701 |H.p. i ; for women (02); Prctsby. control; minimum 
ex|>en»t* f *400; arts atul^eieueeH und music. 




96 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


^ Teachers Collects 

4 Louisiana Stair Normal ('allege, Natch itnchcH (3.3S8 pop.); for men (103) 
and' women (1,009); State control; tuition, free; Ini. rind riu., $IM>; minimum 
expet ise, $255. ^ 

Negro College* 

AV" Orleans ('allege , New Orleans (3S7.219 pop.); for men (350) and Women 
(53(1); M. K. control; tuition, $24; fees, $14; lid. and rm., $153; minimum expense, 
$21X1, majority of students arr employed. 

Straight ('allege, Se w Orleans; for men (-11) ami women (04); A. M. A. control. 

, * Maine 

• Colleges and Uniucyilits 

» 4 ' 

*Batc* College , licwifitnn (31,791 pop.); for men (350), and women (259); min- 
aret ; tuition, $200; fees, Slit); hd. np<l nn., $350; ndnimum expense, $050; arts 
and sciences; scholarships and loans. o 

* limnloin College, Brunswick (5,784 pop.); for men (554); nonsort.; tuition, 
$250; hd. and rm.,~$3S5; inftiimum excuse, $800; arts and sciences; scholar- 
ships and loan funds. 

*Cedl>y College, Wider i lie (13,351 pop.); for men (424) and women (255); 
Hapt . control; i nit ioiTy $200; fres, $30; hd. and rm., $300; mini mum expense, $050; 
arts and sciences; scholarships. , » 

* l ’ nirrrs it j/ of Maine , Orono (3,133 pop.); for men (1,035) and women (209); 
State cold rol; tint ion $125 (nonres., $ 195) ; fecr, $30; hd. and rm.. $270; minimum 
expense, $5(X); a land-grant colleges arts and sciences, agriculture,* education, 
engineering, forestry, mid home economics; scholarships. « 

• 

Independent Professional Schools 

« 

Bangor Thculoyieal Seminary , Hangor (25,97K pop.); for men (41) and women 
(4); Cong. control; minimum c\\pcu«(\ $250 ; theology; all students are employed. 

Maryland K 

\ Colleges and Universities 


O 

ERIC 


Blue Ridge College , New Windsor (512 pop.); for men (33) and women (27); 
Broth, control; tuition, $100-; fees, $20; Ixl. and rim, $220; minimum expense, 
$340; arts and sciences, fine arts, and music. V * 

♦ College of Naive Dame of Maryland, Baltimore (733,820 pop.); for women 
(14S) ; U. ( *. control; tuition, $200; fees, $10; hd. and nn., $500; minimum exjx'nsc, 
$725; arts)nnd sciences. 

'('toucher College , Baltimore; for women (1,053); nonsect.; tuition, $250; fees, 
$15; hd. and rm., $A(X); minimum exixinsc, $800; arts and sciences; scholarships. 

'Ilood ('allege, Frederick (1 1,000 pop.); for women ,(4H7);ltcf. control; tuition, 
$250; fees, $25; hd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $050; arts and sciences. 

'Johns Hopkins University, Haiti more; for meiv-(2,4S5) and women (2,400); 
nonseet.; tuition, $^0; fees, $33; Ixl. and rm., $5&0; minimum cx|mmihc, $1,200; 
arts and stdencesieiTgiucTriiig, economics, education, medicine '(A), public 
health; scholarships. j , * 

hiyobi (' allege , Baltimore; for men (159); R. C. control; tuition, $150; fees, 
$35 (day college); arts and sciences. 

Maryland ('(dirge for Women, Lutherville (005 |x>p.); for women (120); non- 
sect. ; minimum e\|H;iise, $825; arts ami sciences, journalism, home economics, and 
music. 

'Mount St. Mary's College , Kurmitshurg (200 ix»p.); for men (44.2) ; R. C. 
control; tuition, $250; hd. and mi*, $450; minimum expense, $750; arts and 
sciences and theology; scholarships. 

*St. John's ('allege, Annapolis (l 1 ,214 |M>p.)f for men (240); nonseet.;* tuition, 
M50; Intend rm. $480; minimum expense, $730; arts and sciences. 


j 


INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 97 

*$t. Joseph's College. F.mmitsburg; for womi-n (161); R (’. control; tuition, 
$150; hrl. and rm. $450; minimum expense, SOW); arts and sciences. 

(’mini Stale* A'm >n/ Acaderni/, Annapolis; for men (1,456); Kationnl control; 
minimum expense, S7K0. Three students (miri lipmen) are allowed for earli 
Sonnier, Representative, and Delegate in Congress, , r > for the District of Columbia, 
IS from the Unitor! States at large, MM) from enlisted men of the regular N.^vv 
and Marine Corps, and 25 from the Naval Reserves and Marine Corps Reserves, 
(resides I Porto Rican and 4 Filipinos. All are required to la- Cnited Stales 
citizens from 16 to 20 years of age. Midshipmen reeeive $1,072 )kt yea* which 
Is sufficient to meet all expenses. Graduates are commissioned ensigns in the 
Navy and the present policy of the Navy Department requires two years' service 
aft(T graduation. — ^ 

•Crvvcrsity of Maryland, College Park (316 pop.) f for men (860) and women 
(204 j; State control; tuition free (nonres.. 1140) ; hd and rm., $316; minimum 
c\|HUis(\ $513; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, conimeree, 
education, engiiK*eiing, home economics, law, medicine (A), nursing, dentistry 
iBh And pharmacy (A). 

* li nshington ( allege, Chestertown (‘2,537 pop.); fur men (158) and women (05); 
nonsect * tuition, $100; fees, $5; Ini. and room, $388; minimum expense, $oSS; 
arts and sciences. 

MtY.t/rrn Maryland (’allege, Westminster (3,521 pop.); for men (203) and 
women (319); M. I\ control; t nil ion, $150; fees, $40^ hd. and rm., $350; mini- 
mum expense, $000; arts and sciences. 


' ' Independent Professional Schools 

St. Mary's Seminar yi Baltimore;, for men (357); R. C. control; theology. 
Westminster Theological Seminary , Westminster (3,521 pop.); for men (38) and 
women (3); M. V. control; tuition, $100; fees, $20; hd. and rm., $200; minimum 
expense, $320; theology; all studenhs arc employed. 

Woodstock College, Woodstock (245 pop.); for men (108); R. C. control; 
theology. 

Junior Colleges 

St. Charles ( allege , Catonsville (4,500 pop.); for men (104); arts ami science’s. 


Negro Colleges 

* Morgan College, Baltimore (733,826 pop.); for men (190) and women (3SSj; 
M. h. control; arts and sciences; students employed, 201; earn entire way, 81, 

i 

Massachusetts 

^ Colleges and UniccrsitieS 

•^ mh(rit Cnllc Q c ' Amherst (5,550 pop.); for men (750); nonsect.; tuition. 
$300; fees, $100; hd. and rm., $400; minimum ex pense, $800; a. is and sciences; 
scholarships. • 

•Boston College, Chestnut Hill (Boston); for men (1,181); R. C. control; 
tuition, $200; fees, $30 (day college); arts and sciences; scholarships. 

•Boston IJniveraflj , Boston (748,000 pop.); [Jr men (4,859) and women (4,850); 
M. L. control; tint ion, $300; fees, $25; hd. and rm., $400; minimum cxpeiinc, 
$900; arts and sekv ees, religious education, business adin. (A), education, 
theology, law (A), jmd mddicine (h); scholarships. 

•Clark University, Worcester (176,764 pop.): for men (247); nonseet.; tuition, 
$200; hd. and rni., $350; minimum expense, $700; arts and sciences. 

•College of the Holy Cross , Worcester (17Q,754 pop.); for men (1,106); R. C. 
control; tuition, $200; fees, £8; hd. and rm., $375; minimum ex^nsc, $675; 
arts and ^sciences. ^ 

Em mat fit el College, Boston (748,000 pop.); for women (275); R.C. control: 
tuition, $200; arts and sciences. < ^ 

* Harvard University, Cambridge (109,094 pop ); for* men (0.046); iionsect.; 
tuition, $400; foes, $7; Ixl. and rnV.7^$450; minimum ex|K?»iHc, $1,000; arts am! 
sciences, engineering, architecture, forestry, business administration (A), educa- 
tion, theology, law (A), medicine (A), deutistfy (A), and public liealth; scholar- 
ships and loans. 


1 


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SELF-HELP. FOR COLLEGE STUDENT8 


International V. M. C. A. College. Springfield < 1 29.01 4 pop.); for men (529); 
Y. M. (\ A. control; tuition, $270; Foes, $200; Ixl. and nil., $3S0; ininiimim ex- 
pense, $850. Primary object to train officers for thy Y M, (V A.; general and 
technical courses secretarial administration, physical education, county work, 
boys’ work, ami industrial course; scholarships and loan funds. 

Loirdl Text.lr School, Lowell (112.750 pop »; for men t205‘; J^tatr control; 
tuition. $150 ■ nnnres.. S2t H ) • ; fees. $65 ; bd. and no.. $450; minimum expense, 
$674; textile courses, textile engineering, and chemistry. 

* Massachusetts Agricultural Co!Uge % Amherst (5,550 pop A; for men (410) and 
women t 120 ; State control; tuition, $00 (nnnres.. $1S0>; fees, $20; hd and rm., 
$300; minimum exjx n^e. $425; land-grant college; acriculture; loan funds. -y 

* Mti*$tichu$ctts Ihxi.mlc of Tichnnlogv, Cambridge; for men (2,670) and 
womni (40.; noiM-rt ; tuition. $400; fees, $43; minimum expense *1,040; a 
land-grant college; general science. engineering, atid architect ure; scholarships. 

* Mount Hobjuh t'alUgx, South Hadley (5,527 pop.); fnr women (1,004); non* 
sect.; tuition. $3$0; ft rn $30; hd. and mi., $540; minimum expense, $020; arts and 
sciences; scholarships. 

A orthi astern Cninrsity, Host on (748,000 popA; for men (l.Slfe; Y. M. C A 
control; tuition. $200; fees $25; hd. and rim, $255; minimum expense, $560; 
engineering, commerce, and law. 

*1{adelijjc College, Cambridge; for women (714'; nonsect.; tuition, $300; 
bd. and rm., §513; minimum expense, $913; aids and sciences.. 

+Simmons CalUgc, Boston; for women ( 1 . IGL ; uoumm I ; tuition. $225; fees, 
$10; hd. and rm,, $310 to $525; minimum exj>enso, $800; arts ami sciences; 
scholarships. 

*Swith College, Northampton (21,051 pop); for women (2,142); nonsert.: 
tuition, $400; fee. $20; bd. and rm., $500; minimum expense, $750; arts and 
sciences; scholarships and loans. 

* T nfts C ollegr , Tufts College (39,03$ popA ; for men (L7S1\and women (320): 
linnseet . ; "tuit ion. $250; bd. and rm , $350; minimum expense, $080; arts and 
sciences, engineering, theology, medicine i \). and dentistry (A); scholarships 
and loans. 

* Wellesley College , Wellesley <6,224 popA; for women (1,604); nonsect.; 
tuition, $ 10*0; bit. and rm., $600; minimum expense, $1,000; residents in coojxTa- 
tive house reduces exjx'nse by $300; arts and sciences; scholarships. 

* Wheaton College, Norton <2,374 popA; for women (510); nonsect.; tuition, 
$325; bd. and rm , $525; minimum expense, $050; arts and sciences. 

^Williams College . Wiiliamstown LA. 707 pop.); for men (815); nonsect.; 
tuition, $400; bd. and nu., $112; minimum expense, $000; arts and sciences; 
scholarships. 

Micro */rr Polytechnic Institute, Worcester (176.754 popA; for men (584); 
nonsect ; tuition, $250; fees, $30; bd. and rm., $405; ntiniimim expense, $780; 
general science and engineering; scholarships and loan funds. 

* • 

Independent Professional Schools 

C ollegr of Physician# and Surgeons, Boston; for men (112) and women (6); rated 
class C medical #chool ; tuition, $120; medicine (C). 

Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge; for#nen (52): Epis. control; tuition, 
♦ 150; fees. $10; bd. ami rm., $270; minimum expense, $430; theology; nearly all 
students are employed. 

Cordon College of Theology , Boston; fnr men (112) and women (104); theology. 

Massachusetts College of Osfcojmlhy, Boston; for men (70) am! women (10); 
tuition, $100 to $120; osteopathy ; three-fourths of students are employed. 

* Massachust Its College of Pharmacy , Boston; for m*n (398) and women (34); 
tuition, $l50r^ees, $55; bd. and rm., $350; minimum expense, $700; pharmacy 
(A). Two-thirds <3 students are employed during term-time and nearly all earn 
t heir cut ire w av. 

* 

Middlesex C allege of ^Medicine awl Surgery, Boston; for men (231) and women 
(10) : tuition, $165 to $iS5; medicine (C) ; rated class C. Nearly all of students are 
employed* 

New Church Theological Seminary , Cambridge; for men (9); Ch. of New Jeru- 
salem control; theology. 


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INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

* 


99 


X net on Theological Institution, Newton Outer (0,07.0 pop i ; for men (82) and 
women U3 ; Hapt . control; theology. 

1 i»r'in l.tue School, Boston; for vwtint i: 1*23'; dav msl evenfnr school: tuition 
$125; law. ‘ * 

St. John's boston Ecclesiastical Seminary, Boston; for nun (lGS'i; R. C. control; 

tiirologv 

Suffolk Law School, Boston; fur men (2,215*; tuition, $1-10; law. 


Junior Colleges 


+ 

Atlantic l man ColUgc , South Lancaster ( 1 ,230 pop * ; for men (SO) and women 
(IBB; arts and sciences and theology; students employed, 71. 

bind ford Academy, Bradford < Haverhill' ; for uninrn ;17f>); tmnsee.; tuition, 
$300; fees, $13; hd. ami nn., $ ( .K)0; minimum expense. $1,213; arts and sciences; 
no selBholp opportunities. 


Teachers Colleges 


Massachusetts School of Art, Boston; for men (2*3) and women (538); State 
control; tuition, $.50; fees, $15; lul. and rni., $160; minimum expense, $525; most, 
students are employed. 

State X or rnal School , Bridgewater iS. 42S pop.) ; for men (60) and women (504); 
State control; tuition, free; fees, $10; Bd. and rm.. $300; a third of students are 
. employed. 

State Normal School , Framingham Center (17,033 pop.); for women (541); 
Slate control; tuition, free; fees, $10; hd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $400; 
students employed, 70. 

State Normal School , Salem (42,520 pop ); fpr men (3(^>md women (503); State 
control; tuition, free; foes, $10; Bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $400; loan 
funds; majority of students are employed. 

State A orrnal School, \\ urcester (170,751 pop.\ for women (270); State control; 
tuition free; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense $400. 

Teachers College oj the ('Uy of Boston, Boston; for women (805); city* control; 
tuition free (noures. $240); part of the city school system. 


i 


Michigan 

Colleges and Unifiers ilia 

Adrian College, Adrian (11,878 pop.); for men (120) and women (172); M. P. 
control; tuition $150; foes, $14; bd. and rm., $2.88; minimum expenqo, $500; 
arts and sciences and music. 

* Albion College, Albion (8,354 pop.); for men (445) and women (354); M. E. 
control; tuition, $13& fees, $30; hd. and rm., $173; minimum excuse, $600; 
arts and sciences amfinusic. 

*Alma College, Alma (7,542 pop.): for men (101) and women (109); Preshy. 
control; tuition^U50; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $261; minimum excuse, $501); 
arls and scien$Prand music. 

* Rattle Creek CoUcgc } Battle Crock (30,164 pip.); for men (100) and woman 
(t»l>0) ; nonsect.; tuition, $100; fees, $12; bd. and rm., $387; minimum expense, 
$017; arts and sciences and homo economics. 

Calvin College, Grand Rapids (137, 634 pop.); for men (210) and women (114); 
Ref. control; tuition, $75; fees, $10; bd. and nn., $275; minimum expense, 
$350j arts and sciences, education, and theology. 

* College of the City of Detroit, Detroit (903,678 pop.): for men (1,380) and 
women (699); city control* tuition, $75 (nonres. $175); fees, $20; bd. and rm., 
$480; minimum exj>cnBe $800; arts and sciences and pharmacy. 

Emmanuel Missionary Vollege, Berrien Springs (918 pop.); for men (295) and 
women (367); S. D. A. control; tuition, $99; bd. and rm., $207; minimum 
expense, $334; arts and sciences, commerce, education, home.economics, theology, 
* and music; accredited as junior college. 

* Hillsdale College, Hillsdale (5,476 Pop.); for men (203) and women (235): 

nonsect.; tuition, $200; bd. and rm. # $310; minimum expense, $650; arts and 
icienccs and music. # 



100 


SELF-HELP FOR COLIJ3GE STUDENTS 


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* If ope roZ/fjp. IIolland (12,183 pop.); for men (2881 and women (213); Dutch 
Ref. control; tuition, $100; bd, and rm., $275; minimum exjiense, $400; arts 
and sciences and music. 


*Knlaiiuiz<m ('allege, Kalamazoo ' (48,487 pop.) ; for men (227) and women 
(I04i; Rapt, control; tuition, $150; fees, $21; bd. and rm., $288; minimum 
expense $500; arts and sciences. 

* Manjgrove College, Monroe; for women (130); R. C. control; tuition, $150; 
fees, $20; Ixt. and rni., $288; minimum expense, $434; arts and sciences. 

* Michigan College of Mines, Houghton (4,460 pop.); for men (242); State 
control; tuition free tnonres. $50); fees, $70; bd. and rm., $378; books $80- 
minimum expense. $700; engineering. 

* Michigan Stale College of Agriculture and Applied Science, East Lansing 
(1,889 pop.); for men '2,085) and women (860); State control; tuition, $105 

\ (non res. $150); fees, $22; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense $450; a land- 
grunt college; applied science, agriculture, engineering, forestry, home economics, 
and veterinary medicine; scholarships and loan funds. 

Xmnrelh College, Nazareth (110 pop.); fur women '103); R. C. control; arts 
und sciences; tuition, lid. and rni., $400. 

Olivet College, Olivet (500 pop.); for men (172) and women (178); nonsect, 
control; tuition, $125; fees, $23; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense $475; 
arts and sciences; scholarships and loans. 

Cnivcrsity of Ikteoit, Detroit; for men (169); R. C. control; tuition. $175; 
fees, $16; bd. and rm., $360; minimum expense, $650; arts and sciences, engi- 
neering, commerce, journalism, foreign trade, commercial art, and law; scholar- 
ships. 

\ * Uriy entity of Michigan, Ann Arbor (19,516 pop.) ; for men (8,542) and women 

* control; tuition^ $93 (nonres.. $118,); fees, $25; bd. and rm., $425; 

minimum expense, $800; arts and sciences, engineering, architecture, education, 
romJncn'C (A), law (A), medicine (A), dentistry (A), Jiursing^pharmacv (A) 
journalism (A). “ 

Independent Professional Schools 


hilrm't College of Lnu; (Y. M. C. A.), Detroit; for men (823); V. M. C. A. 
control; tuition, $105; fees, $15; bd. und rim, $432; law. 

* Detroit College of Medicine und Surgery, Detroit; for men (202), and women 
(4); tuition, $285 (res., $200); medicine (A). 


* Detroit I nstitute of Technology , Detroit; pharmacy (A) and chemistry. (Infor- 
mation incomplete.) 

Suomi College , Hancock (7,527 pop.); for men (8) and women (9); Finnish Ev. 
Luth. control; theology and liberal arts. 

ircdrrw Theological Seminary , Holland (12,183 pop.); for men (40); Ref. 
control; theology. 

Junior Colletts 


*J unior College , Flint (136,500 pop.); for men and women (194); public control; 
tuition, $75; arts and sciences. 

'Junior College , Hay City (47,554 pop.); for men (114), and women (77); city 
control; tuition, $30 (nonres., $100;; part of public-school system; students 
employed, 06. 

* Junior College , Grand Rapids (137,634 popM ; for men (479), and women (223); 
city control; tuition, $62 (nonres., $135); part of public-school system; arts ana 
sciences, commerce, engineering, education, fine arts, music. 

* Highland Park Junior College, Highland Park (308 pop.); for men (146), and 
women (120); city control; tuition (nonres.), $150; part of public-school system; 
students live at home and the majority are employed. 

r- 

Teacher 1 Colleges 


*Cenlral Michigan Normal School, Mount Pleasant (4,819 pop.); for men (352), 
and women (058); State control; tuition, $15; fees, $15; bd. and nn., $252; 
minimum expense, $325; loans; employed during term-time, men 80, women 70. 

* Detroit Teachers' College, Detroit; for men (33), and worneu (1,004); city 
control; loan funds available. 



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INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 101 


♦ Michigan Stale Normal College , Ypsilanti (7,413 pop.); for mew (600), ami 
women (1,710); State control; tuition, $35; bd. and rm'., $375; minimum 
expense, ($425; loans nnd^scholarships; employed, men 40 per cent, women 20 
per cen$: 

* Northern State Normal School Marquette (12,718 pop.); for men (1,888), and 
women (542); State control; tuition, $15; feo6,Sl5; bd. and rm., $285; minimum 
expense, $369. 

* Western State Normal Sctfbol Kalamazoo (48,487 pop.); for men (792), and 
women ( 1,518) ; State control; tuition, $15; fees, $18; bd. and nu„ $300; 
minimum expense, $400; one-fifth of students are employed, 

Minnesota 


College. 3 and Universities 

Augsburg Cotfepr, Minneapolis (3*0,582 pop.); for men (166), ami women (78); 

Luth. control; tuition, $60; fees, $16; bd. and rm., 8185; minimum cxficiisc, 

$250; arts and sciences, music, and theology. 

'Carlctor College , Northficld (4,023 pop.); for men (306), and women (120); 
Donscct.; tuition, $300; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $705; 
arts and Beicnees; scholarships and loan funds. 

'College aj St. Catherine, St. Paul (234,698 pop.); for women (315); R. 0. con- 
trol; tuition, $150; fees, |25; bd. and rm., $450; minimum expense, $600; arts and 
sciences, fine arts, and music. 

'College of St. Teresa, Winona (19,143 pop ); for women (451); R. 0. control; 
tuition, $150; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $350; minimum expense, $600; arts and 
sciences. 

'College of St. Thomas , St. Paul (234,698 pop.); for men (450); R. O. control; 
tuition, $150; bd. and rm., $410; minimum expense, $625; arts and sciences, 
commerce, education, music, and law. 

♦Concordia College , Moorhead (5,720 pop.); for men (203) and women (217); 

Luth. control; tuition, $125; fees,llO; bd. and rm., $207; minimum expense, $350; 
arts and sciences. 

'Gustavus Adolphus College , St. Peter (4,335 pop.); for men (2S3) and women 
(211); Luth. control; tuition, $100; fees, $30; bd. and rm., $225; minimum ex- 
pense, $460; arts and sciences and .music. 

'Hamline University , St. Paul; for men (342) and women (238); M. E. control: 
tuition, $200; fees, $27; bd. and rm., $306; minimum expense, $606; arts and 
sciences. 

'Macalestcr College , St. Paul; for men (229) and \Vomen (237); Piesbv. control; 
tuition, $175“ bd. and rm., $320; minimum expense, $600; arts and sciences and 
music. 

St. John's University , Collegeville (small pop.); for men (449); R. C. control; 
tuition, $100; fees, $14; bd. and rm., $286; minimum expense, $400; arts and 
sciences and theology. 

St. Mary's College , Winona; for men (140); R. C. control; tuition, $130; bd. 
and rm., $300; minimum expense, $500; arts and sciences. 

'St. Olaf College , Northficld (4,023 pop.): for men (586) and women (473); 

Luth, control; tuition, $150; fees, $34; bd. and rm., $259; minimum expense, $500; 
arts and sciences and music; loan funds and scholarships. 

* University of Minnesota , Minneapolis (380,582 pop.); for men (7,587) and 
women (4,528); State control; tuition, $60 (nonres. $90); fees, $28; bd. and rm., 

$350; minimum expense, $709; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agricul- 
ture, commerce (A), education, engineering, forestry, home economics, law' (A), 
medicine (A), nursing, dentistry (A), journalism (A), and pharmacy (A); loan 
funds. , 

Independent Professional Schools $ 

Bethel Theological Seminary , St. Paul (234,698 pop.); for men (38) and wromen 
(36); Bapt. control; minimum expense, $217; theology; over three-fourths of 
students are employed. 

Lulher Theological Seminary , St. Paul; for men (60); Luth. control; arts and 
sciences, music, and theology. 



102 


SELF-HELP FOK COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Minnesota College of Law , Minneapolis; for men (INCu mu 1 women (14); tuition, 
$!00; law; all students are employed. 

Morth western ('allege of Laic, Minneapolis; for men U50) and women (8); a day 
and cloning school; tuition, SS5; fees, 810; Ixl. and rrn., $270; law. 

Scahury Divinity School , Faribault 1 1 1 ,080 pop.); for men (25); P. E. control; 
theology. 

St. Paul College aj Law, St. Paul; for men (337) arid women (0); tuition, $100; 
bd. and nn., $300; luw; all students are employed. 

St Paul Seminary, St. Paul; for men (L9G>; It. C. control; theology. 

* 

Junior Collects 

College nf St. St Lola <tira, Duluth (08.017 pop.); for women (07); R. C. control; 
arts and sciences. 

Itasca Junior ('allege, Coleraine; for men (ll) and women (17); city control; 
part of public-school system; tuition, $40 (nonres., S(>0). 

Junior College, Eyelet li (7,203 pop.); for men (SO) and women (45); city control; 
tuition free; part of public-schuul sy stem; half of the students ajo employed. 

*J unior Coll* gc, Ilihhirig (15.080 pop.); for men (102) and women (110); city 
control; tuition fnr (nonres., 810); part of public-school system; arts and sciences, 
engineering, commerce, homo economics, and physical education. 

*J unior College, Rochester (13,722 pop.); for men (75) and women (55); city 
control; part of public-school system; tuition, $100. 

* Junior College, Virginal (11,022 pop.); for men (84) and women (70); city 
control; part of public-school system; 08 students are employed; no tuition. 

St. Benedicts College, St. Joseph (717 pop.); for women (104); R. C. control; 
arts and sciences. 

Teachers Colleges 

* State Teachers (folLge, Moorhead (5,720 pop.); for men (09) and women (52S); 
State control; tuition, $i>0; lid. and rrn., $195; minimum expense, S255. 

* Stair Teachers College, \\ inona (19,1 13 pop.); for men (70) and women (557); 
State control; tuition free; l>d. and nn., $213; minimum expense, $279. 

* State Teacher# C alley-', & t. Cloud (15,875 pop.); State control; tuition, $90; 
fees, $30; bd. and rin., $210; minimum expense, $300. 

Mississippi 
Colleges and Universities 

Rclhavrn College, Jackson (22. M 7 pop.); for women (100); Presby. control; 
tuition, $100, bd. uiul nn., -8300; minimum expense, $400; arts and sciences and 
music. 

*Bluc Mountain College , Blue Mountain (051 pop.); for women (309); Rapt, 
control; tuition $S0; fees, $12; hd. and rrn., $135; minimum expense, $315; arts 
and sciences, education, home economics, fine arts, and music. 

Grenada Colit ge, ('.rermda (3,402 pup.); for women (ISO); M. E. So. control: 
tuition, $03; fees, $10; hd. and mi, $237: minimum expense, $310; arts and 
sciences, home economics, fine arts, ami music. 

* Mi Us a ns College, Jackson; for men (271) and women (100); M. E. So. control; 

tuition, $75; fees, $38; hd. and rrn., $202; minimum expense', $318; arts and 
sciences. ** 

* Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical, College, Agricultural College’ (220 
pop.); for men (1,393); State control; tuition free (nonres., $.80); fees, $17; 
bd. and nn., $232; minimum expense, $350; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, 
agriculture, commerce, education, ami cngrTOcring; self-help opportunity. 

* MinsiRsippi Collrgc, Clinton (t>(J9 pop.); for men (515) and women (35): Rapt, 
control, tuition, $85; fees, $44; bd. and nil., $225; minimum expense, $355; arts 
and sciences. 

,, *M***’**'PI» Slate Colin, r. Jor ll i/mcn, Columbus (10,501 pop); for women 
(1,^10) ; Mate control; tuition, $100 (nonres., $200) 'fees, $37; bd. and rm., $155; 
mmimuin expense, $355; art.** aud sciences, home economics, and music. 


INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


103 


1 


'Mississippi Woman's College , Hattiesburg (13;270 pop,); for women (296); 
Bapt. control; tuition, $80; bd. and rm., $252; minimum expense, $432; arts and 

sciences. 

♦ University of Mississippi, Univereity (6,792 pop.); for men (889) and women 
(220); State control; tuition free (non res.. $50); fees, $55; bd. and mi., $200; 
minimum expense, $300; arts and sciences, engineering, commerce, education, 
law, medicine (A), and pharmacy (A). 

Whitworth College, Brookhaven (4,706 pop.); for women *(206); M. E. So. 
control; tuition, $100; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, $340; arts and 
sciences, home economics, and music; accredited as junior college. 

Junior Colleges 

Clarke Memorial College , Newton (1,604 pop.); for men (105) and women (65);# 
Bapt. control; arts and sciences; tuition, $60. 

(iulf Cork College , Gulfport ; for women (1 10) ; private control; arts and sciences. 

Hillman College, Clinton (669 pop.); for women (116); nonsect.; tuition, $60; 
bd. and rm., $230; minimum expense, $300; arts and sciences; students employed. 

10. ' 

Mississippi Synodical College , Holly Springs (2,113 pop.); for women (115>; 
Presby. control; tuition, $80; bd. and rm., $240; arts and sciences and music; 
students employed, 14. 

Teachers Collect 

State Teachers College, Hattiesburg (13,270 pop.); for men (281) and women 
(1,203); State control, tuition free; fees, $24; bd. and rm., $198; minimum ex- 
pense, $222; employed, men 41, women, 62., 

Nc$ro Colleges 

Jackson College, Jackson (22,817 pop.); for men (100) and women (150); 
Bapt.; arts and sciences, education, home economics, mimic, and theology; 
students working, 57. 

Hast University, Hofly Springs (2,113 pop.); for men (39) and women (35); 

M. E. control; arts and sciences. 

Tougaloo College, Tougaloo (26 pop.); for men (19) and jvomen (37); art* 
aud sciences. 

Missouri 

Colleges and Universities 

! * Central College , Fayette (2,381 pon.); for men (491) and women (452); M. E. 

So. control; tuition, $50; fees, $57; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, $350 
(men), $425 (women); arts and sciences and music. 

Central Wesleyan College , Warrenton (800 pop.); for men (148) and womeK 
(204) ; M. E. control; tuition, $100; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $216; minimum^ 
expense, $416; arts and sciences and theology'. 

College of the Sacred Heart , St. Louis (772,897 pop*); for women (86); R. C. 
control; tuition, $250; bd. and rm., $450; minimum expense, $700; art* and 
sciences. 

*C uli'cr-Stockton College , Canton (1,949 pop.); for men (150) and women • 
(114); Christ, control; tuition, $120; fees, $14; bd. and rm., $240; minimum 
expense, $375; arts and sciences. 

* Drury College, Springfield (39,631 pop.); for men (240) and women (234): 
nonsect.; tuition, $125; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $258; minimum expense, $428 
(men), $458 (women); arts and sciences. 

*Lindenwood College , St. Charles (8,503 pop.); for w4nien (467); Presby. 

I control; tuition, $225; bd. and rin., $525; minimum expense, $750; arts and 
sciences, home economics, and music; scholarships. 

* Missouri Valley College, Marshall (5,200 pop.); for men (121) and women 
(1H3); Presby. control; tuition, $142; bd. and rim, $252; minimum expense, 
$400; arts and sciences, 


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104 


8ELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

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s 


Missouri Wesleyan College , Cameron (3,248 pop A; for men (206) and women 
(345); M. E. control; tuition, $105; fees, -$20; b<\ and rm., $2.50;’ minimum 
expense, $155^ ai#s and sciences. 

•Park College y Parkville (019 pop.); for men (200) and women (220); nonsect, 
control; tuition, $80; minimum expense, $200; 350 students work three hours 
daily at manual labor; a self-help college; arts and sciences. 

Rock hurst College , Kansas City (324,419 pop.); for men (91); R. C. control; 
tuition, $125; arts and sciences. 

*St. Louis University y St. Louis (772,897 pop.); for men (2,500) and women 
(500); R. C. control; tuition, $250; fees, $10; bd. arid rm., $500; minimum 
expense, $900; arts and sciences, commerce, education, theology, law (A), medi- 
cine (A), and dentistry (A), 

*Tarkio College , Tarkio (1,870 pop.); for men (100) and women (175); U. 
Preshy. control; tuition, $90; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $220; minimum expense, 
$358; arts and sciences and music. 


* University of Missouri , Columbia (10,392 pop.); for men (2,000) and women 
(1,350); State control; tuition, $60 (nonres., $80); hd. and rm., $330; minimum 
expense, $5t0; ft land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, commerce (A), 
education, engineering, journalism (A), law (A), and medicine (A); scholarship. 

+ Washington University, St. Louis; for men (2,2.50) and women (1,151); non- 
Bcct.; tuition, $22.5; foes, $12; bd. and rm., $337; minimum expense, $650; arts 
and sciences, engineering, architecture, commerce (A), fine arts, law (A), medi- 
cine (A), dentistry (A), and nursing; scholarships and loans. 

*Wehstcr College , Webster G roles (9,474 pop.); for women (157); R, C. con- 
trol; tuition, $150; fees, $15; bd. and nn., $3.50; minimum expense, $515; arts 
and sciences. 


•Westminster College , Fulton (5,595 pop.) ; for men (329); Preshy. control; 
tuition, $150; fees, $18; bd. and rm., $240; minimum expense', $408; arts and 
sciences. 

•William Jewell College t Liberty (3,097 pop,); for men (340) and women (180); 
Bapt, control; tuition, $120; fees, S2J; bd. and nn., $240; minimum cxjxmsu, 
$400; arts and sciences. 


Independent Professional Schools 


Bcntnn College of Ixim, St. Louis; for men (114) and women (11). Tuition, $150; 
fees, $10; law. 

City College of Law nrnl Finance , 8t. Louis; for men (441) and women (14); 
tuition, $125; commerce and law. 

Concordia Theological Semi nary f St. Louis; for men (3S4); Ev. Luth. control; 
theology. 

Eden Theological Seminary, Webster Groves; for men (72); Evang. control; 
tuition free; fees, $40; bd. and rm., $125; minimum expense, $165; theology; 
over half of students are employed. 

‘ Kansas City Collrnk of Osteopathy and Surgery , Kansas City; for men (114); 
tuition, $200; fees, $35; bd. and nn., $300; osteopathy; nearly all students arc 
employed. 

Kansas City College of Pharmacy , Kansas City; for men (144) and women (2); 
tuition, $150; fees, $25; pharmacy. 

Kansas City School of Lau\ Kansas City; for men (03S) and women (SI); 
tuition, $105; foes, $40; a night school; law; nearly all students arc employed. 

Kansas City University of Physicians and Surgeons , Kan aft. s Citv; for men (32); 
rated class C medical school; thition, $200; fees, $9; medicine (C). 

•Kansas City Western Dental College , Kansas City; for men (278); tuition, 
$250; fees, $37; bd. and rm., $419; dentistry (A); three-fourths of students are 
employed. ' 

Kendrick Theological Seminary , Webster Groves; for men (217); R. C. control; 
minimum expense, $400; theology; no students are employed during term-time. 

Louis College of Pharmacy , St. Louis; for men (224) and women (9); tuition, 
$200; pharmacy (A). 

Xenia l/nited Presbyterian Theological Seminary , St. Louis; for men (80) &n<f 
women (2); U. Preaby. control; theology. 



INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 
Junior Colleges 


105 


*Christian College, Columbia (10.392 pop.); for women (219); Christ, control; 
tuition, $250; bd. and rm., $450; minimum cxpcnac>$K50; arts and sciences; girls 
employed, 20. 

Colley College for Young Ladies, Nevada (7,139 pop.); for wofnen (146); 
nonsect . ; tuition, $150; arts and sciences, education, and home economics; 46 
students work. 

*Flat River Junior College, Flat River; for men and women (117); tuition, $50; 
arts and sciences. 

Hardin (Allege, Mexico (6,013 pop.); for women (156); Bapt. control; tuition, 
1250; bd. and rm., $450; minimum expense, $850; arts and sciences, education, 
home economics, and music; students employed, 43. 

* Kansas City Junior College, Kansas City; for men (779) and women (679); 
city control; no tuition (nonces. $125); part of public-school system; all students 
live at home; arts and sciences and general engineering. 

*Krmper M Hilary School, Boonville; for men (120); private control; arts and 
sciences. 

Missouri Christian College, Camden Point (212 pop.); for women (38); Christ, 
control; arts and sciences. 

Ozark Wesleyan College, Carthage (10,068 pop.); for men (123) and women 
(111); M. E. control; tuition $100; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense 
$400; arts and sciences; students employed, 78. 

Palmer College, Albany (2,016 pop.); for men (42) and women (76); Christ, 
control; tuition, $90; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $200; minimum expense, $325; arts 
and sciences and music; students employed, 45. 

*The Principia, St. Louis; for men (194) and women (204); Christ. Science 
control; tuition, $325; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $875; minimum expense, $1,400; 
arts and sciences; loan funds and scholarships available; students employed, 35. 

Southwest Raplisl College, Bolivar (1,980 pop.); for men (47) and women (49); 
Bupt. control; arts and sciences. 

* Stephens College, Columbia; for women (580) ; Bapt. control; tuition, $300; * 
bd. and rm., $450; minimum expense, $750; arts and sciences; loan funds available; 
students employed, 10 per cent. 4 

*St. Joseph Junior College, St. Joseph (77,939 pop.); for men (149) and women 
(199/; city control; nonres. tuition, $60; part of the public-school Rvstem; students 
employed, 128. 

St. Mary's Institute, O’Fallon (588 pop.); for women (125); R. C. control; 
arts and sciences. 

Si. Teresa Junior College, Kansas City; for women .(85) ; R. C. control; arts and 
sciences, education, home economics, fine arts, and music. 

* Willi am Woods College, Fulton; for women (265); Christ, control; tuition, 
$150; bd. and riu.,$475; minimum expense, $625; arts and sciences; one-fifth of 
the women are employed. 

WM Mayfield College, Marble Hill (332 pop.); for men (92) and women (79); 
minimum ex|>ense, $260; arts and sciences, music, and theologv; 17 students 
earn their entire oxjicuses. 

Teachers Colleges 


* Central Missouri State Teachers College, Warrensburg (4,811 pop.); for men 

(300) and women (600) ; State control; tuition, $32; bd. and rm., $300; minimum 
[exjtcn.se, $400; loan funds; students emjdoycd, 70. . 

* Harris Teachers College, St. Louie; for men (19) and women (990); nonsect.; 
city control; part, of public-echool system; no tuition; students agree to teach in 
the St. Louis public schools for two years. 

*Kortheast Missouri State Teachers College, Klrksville (7,213 pop.) ; for men (235) 
and women (463); State control; tuition, $37; fees, $10; ltd. and rm., $267; 
minimum expense, $315; students cmjdoyed, 160. 


* Northwest Missouri State Teachers College, Marvvilie (4,711 pop.); for men 
(250) aud women (350); State control; tuition, $46; bd, and rm., $270; mini- 
mum expense, $300; half of the men and a third of the women are employed. 



106 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


♦ Southeast Missouri Slate Teachers College , Cape Girardeau (10,252 pop.); for 
men (270) anti women (439); State control; tuition, $30, bd. and rm., $231; 
minimum expense, $205; students employed, 140. . 


♦ Southeast Missouri State Teachers College , Springfield (39,031 pop.); for men 
(416) and women (652); State control; tuition, $45. 

Teachers College of Kansas City, Kansas City; for men (20) and women (500); 
city control. 


Negro Colleges 


* Lincoln University, Jefferson City (14,490 pop.); for men (91) ; and women (90); 
State control; tuition free (nonres., $20); bd. and rm., $100; minimum expense, 
$200; arts and sciences, home economies, art, and music; self-help opportunities. 


Montana 

Colleges and U nicer silles 

Intermountain Union College , Helena (12,037 pop.); for men (86) and women 
(98); Presby.; tuition, $120; fees, $8; bd. and nn., $275; minimum expense, $403; 
arts and sciences. 

* Montana State College of Agriculture arid Mechanic arts , Bozeman (0,483 pop ); 
for men (702) and women (280); State corftrol; tuition free (nonres., $75); fees. 
$83; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $400; a land-grant college; arts and 
sciences, agriculture, engineering, home economics, applied art, education; 
scholarships and loans. 

Montana State School of Mines , Butte (41,611 pop.); for men (131) and women 
(35); State control; tuition free (nonres., $75); fees, $60; bd. and rm., $405; 
minimum expense, $465; engineering. 

Mount St. Charles College , Helena (12,037 pop.); for men (96); R. C. control; 
tuition, $100; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $350; minimum expense, $500; arts and 
'sciences; accredited as junior college. 

*State University of Montana, Missoula (12,668 pop.); for men (875) and 
women (700); State control; tuition free (nonres., $75); bd. and rm., $315; 
minimum expense, $600; arts and sciences, forestry, commerce, education, jour- 
nalism (A), fine arts, music, law (A), and pharmacy (A). 


Nebraska 

Colleges and Unioersiiies 

Coiner College, Bethany (1,078 popfc; f;;r men (100) and women (90) ; Christ, 
control; tuition, $120; fees, $79; 1x1. and rm., $280; minimum expose, $479; arts 
and sciences. 

* Creighton Uniyersitv, Omaha (191,001 pop.); for men (1,085) and women (806); 
It. C. control; tuition $120; fees, $52; l>d. and rm., $275; minimum expense, $150. 
arts and sciences, commerce, education, law (A), medicine (A), dentistry (A), and 
pharmacy (A). 

Dana College, Blair (2,702 pop.); for men (84) and women (44); Danish Luth. 
control; tuition $100; fees, $15; bd. and rm., $243; minimum expense, $358; arts 
and sciences and theology. 

*Doane College, Crete (2,445 pop.); for men (119) and women (108); Cong, 
control; tuition $150; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $500; 
arts and sciences. 

Duchesne College, Omaha (191,601 pop.); for women (110); R. C. control; 
tuition, $150; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $550; arts and 
sciences. 

Grand Island College, Grand Island (13,947 pop.); for men (107) and women 
(84); Bapt. control; tuition, $125; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $240; minimum expense, 
$465; arts and sciences. 

•Hastings College, Hastings (11,647 pop.); for men (484) and women (400); 
Presby. control; tuitiou, $100; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $231; minimum expense, 
$341; aria and sciences and music. 



INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


107 


O 

ERLC 


Midland College Fremont (9,605 pop.); for men (170) and women (230); 
Lutii, control; tuition, $160; fees, $14; bd. and rm., $234; minimum expense, 
$494; arts and sciences and theology, 

Nebraska Central College , Central City (2,410 pop.); for men (40) and women 
(70); Friends control'; tuition, $108; bd. and run, $216; minimum expense, $424; 
arts and sciences. 

♦ Nebraska Wesleyan University , University Place (4,112 nop,); for men (303) 
and women (463 L61. E. control; tuition, $120; fees $5; bd.anfl rin. ,$225; minimum 
expense $500; art^and sciences, education, and fine arts; scholarships. 

Union College , College View (2,249 pop.); for men (240) and' women (200); 
S D. A. control; tuition, $99; fees, $10; bd. and rin., $211; minimum expense, 
$320; arts and sciences; accredited as a junior college. 

'University of Nebraska , Lincoln (54,948 pop.); for men (3,686) and women 
(2,654); State control ; tuition free (nonres/ charge varies) ; fees, $il); bd.andrm., 
$400; minimum expense, $650; a land-grant college; urts and sciences, agriculture, 

I commerce (A), education, engineering, home economics, journalism (A), fine 
arts, law (A), medicine (A), dentistry (B), pharmacy (A), and nursing. 

University of Omaha , Omaha (191,601 pop.); for men (370) and women C532); 
nonsoct,; tuition, $100; arts and sciences, commerce, law, and music. 

York College , York (5,388 pop.); for men (111) and women (140); U. B. control; 
tuition, $120; bd. and rm., $180; minimum expense, $400; arts and sciences, com- 
merce, home economics, fine arts, and music. 

I ndependent Professional Schools 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary , Omaha; for men (40) and women (2); 
Presby. control; tuition'free; minimum expense, $230; theology; nearly all stu- 
dents are employed. 

Teachers Collects 

* Nebraska State Normal College , Chadron (4,412 pop.); for men (100) aud 
women (212); State control; tuition free; fees $18; bd. and rm.,1189. 

* Nebraska Stale Normal School and Teachers College , Kearney (7,702 pop.) 
for men (197) and women (523); State control; tuition free; bd. and rin., $180; 
minimum expense, $285; students employed, 125. 

* Nebraska State Normal School and Teachers College , Peru (783 pop.); for men 
(201) and women (353); State control; tuition free; fees, $16; bd. and rm., $234; 
minimum expense, $325; students employed, 32. 

* Nebraska State Normal • School and Teachers College , Wayne (2,115 Pop.): 
for men (600) and women (1,200); State control; tuition free; fees, $50;'bd. ana 
rm., $200; minimum expense, $300; students employed, 60. 

Nevada 

Colleges and U nicer si tits 

* University of Nevada , Reno (12,016 pop.); for men (582) and women (418); 
State control; tuition free (nonres. $150); fees, $23; bd. and rm., $280; minimum 
expense ($350 res.) ($500 nonres.); a land-grant collcue; arts and sciences, 
agriculture, education, engineering, and home economics; loans and scholarships. 

New Hampshire 4 

Colleges and Unictrsities 

■s. * 

* Dartmouth College , Hanover (1,651 pop.); for men (2,253); nonsect.; tuition, 
$400; bd. and rm., $340; minimum expense, $950; arts and sciences, engineering, 
commerce (A), and medicine (A); scholarships and self-help opportunities. 

Si. Anselm's College , Manchester (78.384 pop.): for men (312); R. C. control: 
tuition, $100; fees, $12; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $382; arts ana 
sciences and theology. 

'University of New Hampshire , Durham (749 pop.); for men (1,140) and 
women (490); State control; tuition, $76 (nonres. $150); fees, $54; bd. and rm. t 
$283; minimum expense, $460; a land grant oollege; arts and science^, agriculture, 
engineering, forestry, and home economics; loan funds and scholarships. 


31696°— 29 8 



o 

ERLC 


108 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

# 

* . New Jersey 


Colleges and Universities 

Alma College, Zarapcth (small pop.); Jnr men (81. and women (12); Pillar of 
Fire control; minimum expense, $000; arts niul sciences. 

* College of St. Elizabeth, Convent Station (25 pop.); for women (302); R. C. 
control; tuition. $200; fees, $12; bd. and rm„ $500; minimum expense, $750; 
arts and sciences; scholarships. 

* Georgian Court College, Lakewood (6,1 10 pop.) ; for women (150); R. C. control; 
tuition, $400; bd. and rm., $700; minimum expense, $1,300; arts und sciences, 
education, .home economics, fine arts, and music. 

* Princeton University, Princeton (5.017 pop.); for men (.2,148); nonsect; tuition, 
$450; fees, $35; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $885; arts and sciences, mid 
general engineering; scholarships and Opportunities. 

•Rutgers University, New Brunswick (32,779 pop.); for men (1.211) and women 
(1,020); State control; tuition, $200 (men), $100 (women); fees $24; bd. and rra„ 
$325 (men), $425 (women); minimum excuse, $009. to $050; a land-grant <•< dlege, 
arts and sciences, agriculture, engineering, ceramics, home economies; loans nnd 
scholarships. 

Scton llall College, South Orange (7,274 pop.); for men (154); R. C. control; 
tuition, $100; fees, $15; bd. and rm., $425; minimum expense, $025; arts and 
sciences and theology. 

* Eleven* Institute, of Technology, Hoboken (08,100 pop.) ; for men (440); nousect.; 
tuition, $400; bd. and rm., $382; supplies, $75; minimum expense, $857; mechan- 
ical engineering; loan funds and scholarships. 

Upsala College, East Orange (50,710 pop.); for men (108) and women (95); 
Luth. control; tuition, $175; fees, $23; bd. and rm., $315; minimum excuse, $512; 
arts and sciences and music. 

Independent P‘ s'cssional Schools 

Bloomfiehl Theological Seminary, Bloomfield (22,019 pop.); for men (77); 
Presbv. control; tuition, $100; bd. and rm., $170; minimum expense, $300; arts 
and sciences and theology; all students are employed. 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison (5,523 pop.); for men (170) and women 
(41); M. E. control; tuition free; fees, $55; bd. and rm., $200; minimum expense, 
$255; theology; loan funds and scholarsliips; nearly all students are employed. 

Newark Technical School, Newark; for men; municipal and Stajf control; 
engineering. 

* New Jersey College of Pharmacy, Newark (414,524 pop.); for men (250) and 
women (15); tuition, $185; fees, $25; pharmacy (A), 

New Jersey Law School, Newark; for men (913) and women (900); tuition, 
$200; fees, $20; law; most students are employed. 

Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton; for men (253); Presby. control; 
tuition free; minimum cx|KMise, $300; theology; scholarships; one-fourth of the 
students are employed. • 

Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church in America, New Brunswick 
(32,779 pop.) ; for inen (24); Kef. control; tuition free; niiniipuin expense, $40t);all 
students are employed iu church work; theology. 


‘ ' New Mexico 

Colleges and Universities 

*New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, State College (21 pop); 
for men (204) and women (93); State control; tuition, $22 (nonres., $52) ; fees, $20; 
hd. and rm., $247 ; minimum exjxmse, $350; a land-grant oollege; arts and sciences, 
engineering, agriculture, commerce, and home economics. 

New Mexico School of Mines, Socorro (1,256 pop.); for men (70) aiir^imcn 
(4); State control; tuition, $20 (nonres., $50); fees, $15; bd. and rm., $265; 
minimum expense, $380; general science, engineering. 

* University of NewMexico, Albuquerque (15,167 pop.) ; for men (359) and women 
(388); State control: tuition, $30 (nonres., $70); fees, $20; bd. and rm.. $270, 
minimum expense, $320; arts and sciences and engineering; scholarships and loan*. 


o 

ERLC 


r 


INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION - ]()9 

m Junior College* 


Nrw Mexico M Hilary Institute, Roswell (7,033’ pop.) ; for men (564); State 
control; tuition* $200; fees, $200; 1 »rl . and rm., $450; minimdm cxf>en8c\ $850; 
arts and sciences; students employed, 5 per cent. 

V 

Teachers Colleges 

*.\'ew Mexico Normal University, East Law Vegas (3.902 pop.); for men (45) 
«nd women (131); State control; tuition, $20; bd. and rm., $240; minimum 
cs|H'nse, 1272; one-fourth of the students are employed. 

*Nnv Mexico State. Teachers College, Silver City (2,662 pop.); for women (8); 
Mate control; tuition, $20; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $325. 

i 

New York 
College. s and' Untocrsltla 

*Aiiclphi > College, Brooklyn (2,018,356 pop.); for women (600); nonscct.; 
tuition, $309; (day college) arts-and sciences. 

M IJwl University Alfred (598 pop.) ; f„ r men (311) and women (167) ; nonsect.; 
tuition, $250; fees, $80; bd. and rm., $235; minimum expense, $565; arts and 
sciences, ceramic engineering, theology; loans and scholarships. 

,no Ii ? r !' nrd c ' Ncw York ; for women (1,020); nonsect.; tuition, $300; fees, 
$30-; 1x1. and rin., $460; minimum cxiwnse, $790; arts and sciences; scholarships 
and loans. - 

*Cavmus College, Buffalo (506,775 pop.); for men (700) and women JjRI); 
R. t... control; tuition, $200; fees, *12; bd. and rm., *324; minimuraJrfBcufcc, 
*600; nrhs and sciences; scholarships. 

*Clnrkson College of Technology, Potsdam (4,039 pop.)-; for men (354) ^Tonsect.; 
tut i( in, $‘-(X); fees, $38; hd. and rm., $324; minimum expense, $600; cnginccring- 
wholarships. 

.o *£° l ? n,e Hamilton (1,505 pop.); for rn^7505); nonsect.; tuition, 

, 2 * , a? ”ri* and nil., $352; minimum expenses, $652; arts ana sciences 

and theology; scholarships and aids. 

* College of Mount St. Vincent , New York; for women (550); R. C. control* 
tuition, $200; fees, $30; bd. and rm., $500; minimum expense, $730; arts and 
sciences, education, fine arts, and music. 

*Collegc of New Rochelle, New Rochelle (36,213 pop.); for women (762); R. C. 
control; tuition, $250; fees* $10; hd. and rm., $450; minimum expense, $650: 
arts and sciences. 

*Q ( dlegc of the City of New York, New York; for men (20,124) and women 
(6,W3); city control; tuition free to res. (day college); arts and sciences, engineer- 
ing. commerce, and education; loan funds. 

f>*£ nl !T L h€ Heart > Ncw York; for women (174) ; R.'C. control; tuition, 

WOO; hd. and rin., $500; minimum expense, $900; arts and sciences. 

* Columbia University, New York; for men (7,530) and women (7,744) ; nonsect.; 
tuition, $360; fees, $200; bd. and rm., $608; minimum expense, $1,168; arts and 
sciences, engineering, architecture, business (A), journalism (A), education, 
la«' (A), medicine (A), dentistry (B), and pharmacy; scholarships and loan funcLi. 

Coo/ht Union, New York, for men (2,182) and women (476); nonsect.; tuition 
tree; engineering and fine arts. , 

Cornell University, Ithaca (17,004 pop.); for mofi (4,430) and women (1,388); 
nonsect, control; tuition, $400; fees, $32; a land-grant college: arts and sciences, 
engineering, agriculture, architecture, forestry, home economics, law (A), medi- 
cine (A), and veterinary medicine. . 

tin’ Y < l uville , Collc <r e ’ Buffal °i women (220); R. C. control; tuition, $200; fees, 
HO; bd. and rm., $450; minimum expense, $650; arts and soionces. 

College, Elmira (45,393 pop,); for women (596); nonsect.; tuition, 
WK); fees, $6; hd. and rm(, $410; minimum expense, $800; arts and sciences; 
Knolarsliips and loan funds. 


110 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


* Fnrdham University, Now York; Dir men (1,398); R. C. control; tuition, 
$200; fees, $75; bd. and rni, $575; minimum expense $825; arts and sciences, 
commerce, education, law, pharmacy, and social service; scholarships and loan 
funds, 

0 Hamilton College , Clinton (1,270 pop.); for men (424) ; nonsect. ion, $250 
fees, $00; bd. and rm,, $310; minimum expense $700; arts and sciences; scholar- 
ships. t 

0 Hobart Collegcf^j^nov a (14,648 pop.); for men (302); nonscot; tuition, $250; 
fees, $90; bd. rm., 1325; minimum cxp<hrfcc, $800; arts and scienccr; scholarship* 

Houghton College , Houghton (121 pop.); for men (140) and women (140); Wes 
Meth. control; tuition, $120; fees, $7; bd. and rm., $189; minimum ok poiise, $409; 
arts and sciences, music, and theology. * 

* Hunter College of the City of Sew York, New York; for women (3,000); city 
control; tuition free to city res.; arts and sciences; opportunities for self-help, 

* *Kenka College , Keuka Park (45 pop.); for women (246); Rapt, control; 
tuition, $210; fees, $15; bd. rm., $340; minimum expense, 3565; arts and sciences 

* Manhattan College , New York; for men (610); R. 0. control; tuition, $200; 
fees, $50; Ixl. ami rm., $450; minimum oxjxmso, $700; arts and sciences and civil 
engineering. 

* Marymcunt College , Tarrytown (5,807 pop.); for women (135); R. C, control; 
minimum exjumse, $1,200; arts and sciences. 

New York State School oj Forestry , Syracuse (171,717 pop.); for men (352); 
State control; tuition free (nonres. $100); fees, $50; bd, and rm, $108 to $378; 
forestry and ranger school. 

+New York University , New York; for men (1,443) and women (1,440); non sect.; 
tuition, $400; arts and sciences, engineering, commerce (A), education, fine art*, 
retailing, law, medicine (A), and dentistry (B) 

♦ Niagara University , Niagara University (small pop.); for men (328); R. C. 
control; tuition, $200; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $600, 
arts and sciences and theology. 

# * Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn , Brooklyn; for men (432); nonscct.; tuition, 

$300; fees, $50; general science, engineering. * 

* Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute , Troy (72,013 pop.) ; for men (1,460) ; nonsect,; 
tuition, $350; minimum expense, $800; general science and engineering; scholar- 
ships and loan fuuds. 

Russell Sage College , Troy; for women (343); nonsect.; tuition, $250; fees. $35; 
bd. and rm., $450; minimum 'expense, $1,000; arts and sciences. 

*St. bonavctilure's College , St. Bonaventure (small pop.); for men (732) and 
women (68); R. C. control; tuition, $120; fees, $45; bd. and rm., $360; minimum 
expense, $475; arts and sciences, education, and theology; scholarships. 

S(. Francis College, Brooklyn; for men (135); R. C. control; tuition, $150; 
arts and sciences. 

•St. John's College , Brooklyn; for men (380); R. C. control; tuition, $185; 
fees, $25; (day college) arts and sciences, theology, and law; scholarships. 

St. Joseph's College for iromcn, Brooklyn; for women (268); R. C. control; 
tuition, $150; arts and sciences. 

• *St. Lawrence University, Canton (2,631 pop.); for men (386) and women (282); 
nonsect.; tuition, $150; fees, $45; bd. and rm. f $324; minimum expense, $675; 
arts and sciences, home economics, theology, and law; scholarships and loan*. 

*St. Stephen's College , Annandalc (140 pop.); for men (110); Epis. control; 
tuition, $250; fees, $30; Ixl. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $750; arts ana 
sciences; loans and scholarships. 

•Skii'more College , Saratoga Springs (13,181 pop.); for women (551); nonsect.; 
tuition, $300; fees, $35; bd. and rm., $460; minimum expense, $785; arts and 
sciences. 

•Syracuse University , Syracuse; for men (2,247) and women (1,704); nonsect.: 
tuition, $255; fees, $35; bd. and rm., $390; minimum expense, $745; arts and 
sciences, engineering, agriculture, architecture, bupinefcs adm. (A), journalism (A) t 
education, home economics, fiue arts, ^nusic, oratory, library science, law (A), 
medicine (A), and nursing. 


■ 


INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


111 

*l'nion r nierrsit y, Schenectady (88,723 pop.); for men (758); nonscct.; 
tiiitmn, 8300; fees, $50; bd. and rni. f S3SK; minimum excuse, $788; arts ami 
sciences engineering, law, medicine (A), ami pharmacy. 

+ l'hitnl Stairs Military Academy, Wosl Point (1,250 pop.); for men (1,259); 
Nutinmil control; minimum expense, $780; students (cadets) are paid $1,072 |>cr 
year, which is suflieient to meet actual needs at the academy; a candidate fm; a 
cadetship must first obtain an appointment to a vacancy and demonstrate t hat he 
measures up to certain physical and educational standards; full information may 
he obtained from The Adjutant (Icnern! of tl>e Army , Washington, I). C. Upon 
graduation a cadet becomes a second lieutenant in the United States Army 
iit"l is mpiiivd h» serve f«»r a time subsequent to his graduation. 

*1 innrtily of Buffalo, Buffalo (500,775 pop.); for men ^32) and women (410); 
noiMTt ; Imt inn, 8300; fees, $29; bd. and rln., $360; ininimftm expense, 8087; arts 
and A loners, law, medicine (A), dentistry (A), and pharmacy. 

*Ctmersity of Pnclnxtcr. Rochester (295,750 pop.) ; for men (503) and women 
(443 ; nonscet.; tuition, $250; fees: $25; bd. and rm., $301); minimum ex|H?nse t 
$S50; n its atul sciences, mechanical engineering, music, and medicine (A); 
scholarships and loan funds. 

*Yassiir College, Poughkeepsie (35,000 pop.); for women (1,145); nonsect.; 
tuition, Sinn, bd. and mi., $000; minimum exjxmse, $1,000; arts and sciences; 
ample scholarships. 

'Wills Polhge, Aurora (410 pop.); for women (242); nonsect.; tuition, $300; 
fee.-:. $10; lul. .and rm., $700; minimum expense, $1,100; arts and sciences. 

*W'illunn South College, (lenevu (14,618 pop.); for women (154); non.sect.; 
tuition, 8250; b*es, $00; bd. and rm., $325; minimum exjH’nse, $800; arts and 
m iclircs. 

Independent Professional Schools 

w 

Auburn Theological Seminary, Auburn (30,102 pop.); for men (35); Presby. 
control; tuition free; minimum expense, $350; scholarships; theology; two- 
thinls of students are Onqiloy^d. 9 

Bi.hli.ral Si m inary, Sow York; fur m<%i (106) and women (131); theology. 

Brooklyn ('allege of Pharmacy , Brooklyn, for men (474) and women (24); 
tuition, $250; f-cs, $30; pharmacy; half of students are earning their entire way. 

Ihbnicnj Divinity School , Buffalo; for men (8); V. E. control: scholarships; 
theology; all students are employed. 

( inarnl Thf illogical Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church , New York; 
for men (110); P, K. control; theology. * 

llarhrirk Seminary , llart wick Seminary (112 pop.); for men (8); Ev. Luth, 
control; theology. 

Jitn.sh Theological Si niinary of America, New York; for men (78); thc<riogy. 
(Incomplete information.) 

*l.nn a Island College Hospital (medical), Brooklyn; for men (121) and women 
(9l; tuition, S 150; fees, $50; bd. and rm., $500; minimum expense, $1,000; loan 
funds; medicine (A); no students are employed during term time. 

Martin Luther Theological Sfminavy , Buffalo; for men (20); Luth. control; 
theology. * 

Mount Si. Al jdtnmus Theological Stannary, Txsopns (250 pop.); for men (151); 
R. (\ control; a church society manages students' expenses; theology. 

AY 1 r York Homeopathic Medical ('allege and L'lnircr Hospital (medical), New 
York; for men (210) and women (10); rated class B medical school; tuition, $425; 
fees, $05; medicine (13). 

Snr )'ork Lair School, New York; for men (1,157) ; ^tuition, $180; law. 

Ralla Isaac Elehanan Theological Seminary, New York; for men (105); theology. 

Rochester 'Theological Seminary , Rochester; for men (S3) and wtuu^n (3): 
’apt, control; tuition, $125; bd. and rm., $225; scholarships; theology; all 
student n are employed. 

St, Bernard's Seminary, Rochester; for men (210); U. C. control; minimum 
expense, S4ll0; theology; no students arc employed during term-time or summer. 

Union Theological Seminarij, New York; for men (263) and women (129); 
iotordeuoUuiiutkmal; theology. 


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SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

ERLC 


Junior College 

A . M. Chesbrough Seminary , North Chili (320 pop.); for men (11) and women 
(15); arts and sciences. 

Teachers College* 

• State College for Teachers, Albany (113,344 pop.); for men (124) and women 
(1,110); State control; tuition free (non res.. $250); fees, $10; bd. and rm., $300; 
minimunfcexpcnse, $450; scholarships and loans; students employed, 104. 

Stale Normal School , Buffalo; for men (138) and women (940); State control. 


North Carolina 


Colltgts and Universities % 

Atlantic Christian College , Wilson (10,012 pop ); for men (85) and women <Wi; 
v Chris, control; tuition, $70; fees, $15; bd. and rm., $225; minimum expense, $310; 
arts and sciences. 

Belmont Abbey College , Belmont (2.041 pop.); for men (37); R. C. control; tui- 
ti#m, $200; fees, $35; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense', $535; arts and science? 
and theology. 

Catauha CoUeor , Salisbury (13,884 pop.); for men (130) and women ( 1 4 1 ) ; 
Ref. control; tuition, $135; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $245; minimum expense, $400; 
arts and sciences. 

Chowan College, Murfreesboro (621 pop.); for women (162); Bapt. control; 
tuition, $1*00; fees, $22; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, $350; arts and 
sciences, education, home economics, fine arts, and music. 

* Davidson College , Davidson (1,156 pop.); for men (630); Preshy. control; 
tuition, $200; fees, $40; rm. and 1x1., $300; minimum expense, $550; loans and 
scholarships. 

'Duke University, Durham (21,710 pop,); for men (1,283) and women (375); 

• M. E. So. control/tuition, $100; fees, $70; bd. and rm., $260; minimum expense, 
$405; arts and sciences, theology, and law; loan funds. 

# E/on College , Elon (425 pop.); for men (195) and women (205) ; Christ, control; 
tuition, $75; fees, $55; bd. and rm., $275; minimum expense, $315 to $405; art* 
and sciences, commerce, education, home economics, fine arts, and music. 

Flora Macdonald College, Rod Springs (1,018 pop.) ; for women (268); Prcsby. 
control; tuition, $00; fees, $47; bd. and rm., $229; minimum expense, $390; art* 
and sciences, education, home^pconomies, and muskv 

• Greensboro College for Women, Greensboro (19,861 pop.); for women (391); 
M. E. So. control; tuition, $100; fees, $36; bd. and rm., $256; minimum expense, 
$420; arts and sciences. 

• Guilford College , Guilford College (208 pop.); for men (150) and women (150), 
Friends control; tuition, $125; fees, $45; bd. and rm., $180; minimum expense, 
-$350; art£ and sciences, education, home economics, and music. 

Lcnoir-Rhyne College , Hickory (5.076 pop,); for men (127) and women (163); 
Luth. control; tuition, $120; bd. and rm., $248; minimum expense, $356; arts and 
sciences and music. • 

f Meredith College , Raleigh (24,418 pop.); for women (545); Bapt. control; 
tuition, $120; fees, $90; bd. and rm., $205; minimum expense, $415; arts and 
sciences, fine arts, and music; loan funds. 

*North Carolina College for IFomcn, Greensboro; for women (1,698); State 
control; tuition, $45 (nonres. $75); fees, $96; bd. and rm., $180; minimum expenrf, 
$301; arts and sciences, borne economics, music; loan funds. 

North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering , Raleigh (34,418 
pop.); for men (1,511); State control; tuition, $60 (nonres., $80); fees, $76; bd 
and rm., $198: minimum expense, $500; a bind-grant college; business adminl* 
tration, agriculture, education, engineering; loan funds. 

Queen's College , Charlotte (46,338 pop.); for women (370); nonsect.; tuition, 
$120; fees, $5; bd. and rm., $315; minimum exjxjnse, $440; arts and sciences, I 
journalism, education, home economics, and music; scholarships. 

5b Genevieve'* College , Asheville (28,504 pop.); for women (63); R. C. control; 

• tuition, $160; bd. and rm., $350; minimum expense, $000; arte and scienoci» 
education, home economics, fine arts, and music. 


m 


INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


113 


•Salem College, Winston-Salem (48,395 pop.); for women (295); Morav. con- 
trol; tuition, $130; fees, $25; Ixi. and rrn., $480; minimum exjxuise, $635; arts 
and sciences, music, and business; scholarships and loans. 

• University of North Carolina , Cha}>cl Hill (1,483 pop.); for men (2,624) and 
women (120); State control; tuition, $75 (non res., $100); fees, $41; bd. and*rm., 
$243; minim mi expense, $500; arts and sciences, engineering, commerce (A), 
education, law (A), medicine (A), and pharmacy (A); loan funds. 

'Wake Forest College, Wake Forest (1,425 pop.); for men (714); Bapt. control: 
tuition, $100; fees, $55; bd. and rm., $230; minimum expense, $430; arte and 
sciences, law, and medicine (A). 


Junior Colleges 

Davenport College , Lenoir (3,718 pop.); for women (125); M. E. So. control; 
tuition, $100; arts and sciences; women employed, 10. 

Loutsburg College , Louisburg (1,954 pop.); for women (289); M. E. So. control: 
tuition, $60; arts and sciences, home economics, fine arts, and music; employed 
women, 18. 

* Mars Jhll College , Mars Hill (364 pop.); for men (323) and women <282); 
* Bapt. control; tuition, $55; fees, $40; bd. and rm., $180; minimum expense, $275; 

arts and sciences, education, fine arts, and music; employed men, 170; women, 110. 

Peace Institute , Raleigh; for women (258); Presby. control; tuition, $100; arts 
and sciences. 

* St. Man/s School , Raleigh; for women (260); Epis. control; arts and sciences; 
employed women, 16. 

Rutherford College, Rutherford (275 pop.); for men (36) and women (8); M. E. 
4 So. control* tuition, $50; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $175; minimum expense, $246; 
arts and sciences. 

Weaver College , Wcaverville (606 pop.); for men (91) and women (63); M. E. 
So. control; tuition, $50; arts and sciences, home economics, music, commeroe, 
and art; students work, 65. 

* Teachers Colleges 

• East Carolina Teachers College , Greenville (6,772 pop.); for women (736); 
State control; tuition, $30; fees, $30; bd. anu rm., $180; minimum expense, $240; 
loan funds; students employed, 36. 

« Negro Colleges 

Johnson C. Smith Uniter tit y, Charlotte (46,338 pop.); for men (313); arts and 
sciences, and theology; men employed, 220; earn their entire way, 161. 

Lmnqstone College, Salisbury (13,884 pop ); for men (151) and women (166); 
A. M. E. control; arte and sciences and theology; students employed, 62. 

Shdw University, Raleigh; for men (159) and women (168); Bapt. control; 
tuition, $50; fees, $24; bd. and rm., $161 ; minimum exjxinse, $211; arts and 
•deuces, and theology; one-third of the students are employed. 

North Dakota 


Colletts and Universities ) 

*Jamestotm College, Jamestown (6,627 nop.); for men (234) and women (286); 
Preshy. control; tuition, $100; tees, $30; bd. and rm., $243; minimum ex- 
pense, $373; arts and sciences; loan funds and scholarships. 

*North Dakota Agricultural College, Agricultural College (21,961 pop.); for 
men (730) and women (326); State control; tuition, $38.(nonree. $60); fees, 
$20; Ixi. and rm., $252; minimum expense, $412; a land-grant college; arts 
and sciences, agriculture, architecture, education, engineering, home economics, 
and pharmacy (A). 

*University of North Dakota, Grand Forks (14,010 pop.); for men (1,067) and 
women (644); State control; tuition, $40 (nonres. $60); fees, $16; bd. and rm., 
•260; minimum expense, $500; artstUid sciences, engineering, commeroe (A), 
education, law (A), and mediciue (A); loans. 



114 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


Junior Colleges 


\ 


North Dakota School of Forestry Bottineau (1,172 pop.); for men (24) and 
women (35); State control; tuition free; fees, $35; bd. and rin., $202; mini- 
mum expense, $•275; students employed, 22. 

North Dakota State School of Science, Wahpcton (3.069 pop.); for men (163 
and women (150); State control; arts and sciences, engineering, commerce, and 
journalism; students employed, 16. 


•Slate Teachers College , Mayville (1.21ft pop.); f or men (144) and women (783); 
State control; tuition, $45; fees, $N; b ' d rm., $264; minimum cx|>en8e, 
$357; students employed, 38. 


•State Teachers College . Minot (10,470 pop.) ; for men (00) and women (404); 
State control; tuition, $36; fees, $00; bd. and rim, $195; minimum expense, 
$291 ; loan funds. 

* Stale Teachers College, Valiev City (4.086 pop); for men (147) and women 
(720); State contrul; tuition, $30; bd. and rm., $165; minimum expense, $250 


•Antioch College , Yellow Springs (1,264 pop.); for men (,501) and women (189); 
nonBect.; tuition, $250; fees, $23; bd. and rm., $420; minimum expense, $1,035; 
arts and sciences and cooperative engineering; loan funds. 

Ashland College , Ashland (9,249 pop.); for men <2S0) and women (360); 
Breth. control; tuition, $120; bd. and rm., $225; minimum expense, $445; arts 
aud sciences, music, and theology. 

* Baldwin- Wallace College, Berea (2,959 pop.); for men (227) and women (234); 
M. E. control; tuition, $175; fees, $20; bd. and rm,, $278; minimum expense, 
$449; arts and sciences, music, law, theology. 

Blufftcm 1 College , BlufTton (1,950 pop.); for men (121) and women (97); Men- 
non. control; tuition, $140; fees, $14; bd. and rm., $205; minimum expense. 
$375; arts and sciences. 

•Capital University , Columbus (237,031 pop.); for men (275) and women (164): 
Luth. control; tuition, $100; fees, $18; bd. and rm., $185; minimum exj^nse. 
$353; arts and sciences, education, and theology. 

•Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland (796,841 pop.); for men (627); 
nonsect.; tuition, $250; fees, $85; bd. and rm., $456; minimum expense, $850; 
general science and engineering; scholarships, aids, and opportunities. 

Cedan'iUe College , Cedarville (1,028 pop); for men (75) and women (106); 
Ref. Presb. control; tuition, $100; fees, $1$; bd. aud rm., $288; minimum ex- 
pense, $375; arts and sciences and music. 

College of the Sacred Heart , Cincinnati (401,247 pop ); for women (70); R. C* 
control; tuition, $200; fees, $60; bd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $660; 
arts and sciences, education, and music. 

♦ College of Wooster , Wooster (8,204 pop.); for men (388) and women (514); 
Prcsby. control; tuition, $220; bd. and rm., $324; minimum expense, $768; 
arts and sciences and music. 

Defiance College, Defiance (8,876 pop.); for men (137) and women (121); Christ 
control; tuition, $150; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $204; minimum expense, $3*1; arts 
and sciences. 

•Denison University , Granville (1,440 pop.); for men (446) and women (428); 
Bapt. control; tuition, $200; fees, $16; bd. and rm., $30Q; minimum expense, $760; 
arts and sciences; scholarships and loans. 

Findlay College , Findlay (17,021 pop.); for men (121) and women (108); Ch 
of God control; tuition, $150; bd. and rm., $240; minimum expense, $490; art* 
and sciences, commerce, aud music. 

Hebrew Union College , Cincinnati (401,247 pop); for men (115); Hebrew con- 
trol; tuition free; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $650; theology; scholar 
ships and loans. 


Teachers Colleges 



Ohio 


Colleges and Universities 


ERLC 


o 



INSTITUTIONS OP HIGHER EDUCATION 


115 


o 

ERLC 


* 


* Heidelberg University, Tiffin (14,375 pop.); for men (234) And women (192); 
Ref. control; tuition, SI 5; fees, $165; bd. and nu., $250; minimum expense, $430; 
arts and sciences, music, and fine arts. 

*11 1 mm College, Hiram (453 pop.); for men (149) and women (101); nonsect.: 
tuition, $200; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $280; minimum expense, $000; arts and 
sciences. 

'John Carroll C ollege, Cleveland; for men (305); R. O, control; tuition, $150; 
fe'\s $10; bd. and rm., $500; minimum expense, $690; arts and sciences- 

*Ktnynn College , Garnhier (433 pop.); for men (202); P. K. control; tuition, 
$260; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $100; minimum expense, $680; arts and sciences and 
theology. 


*Lnl:r Erie Collrgr , Painpsville (7,272 pop.); for women (201) ; nonsect.; tuition, 
8200; Ik), and rm., $500; minimum expense, $700; arts and sciences. 



'Miami Cnircrsity, Oxford (2,140 pop.); for men (873) and women (902); State 
control; tuition, $00 (nonres., $100); fees, $20; bd. and rm., $279; minimum 
expense, $100; arts and sciences and education. 


Mount St. Joseph CoUrgr, Mount St. Joseph (Oincinnat i) ; for women (84); R. C. 
control; tuition, $150; fees, $35; bd, and rm., $400; minimum expense, $585; arts 
and sciences. 

* Mnu ?rt Union Cofit </e , Alliance (21,603 pop.); for men (306) and women (217); 
M, K. control; tuition, $1S5; foes, $34; bd. and rm., $310; minimum exj>ense, 
$529; arts and sciences and music. 

'M'ol.imjmn ('ollvye ■, New Concord (S89 pop.); for men (425) and women (475); 

\ Pnsb. control; tuition. $150; fees, $25; bd, and rm., $250; minimum expense, 
$175; arts and sciences, education, and music; scholarships. t 

Xotrr I hi mo C ollege , Cleveland; for women (90); R. C. cont rol^ tuition, $180; 
fees, >30; bd. and rm., $350; minimum expense, $560; arts and sciences. 

'*0l>*rlin College, Oberlin (4,236 pop.); for men (713) and women (956); non- 
sort.; tuition, $300; bd and rm., $400; minimum expense, $750; arts and sciences, 
music, and theology; scholarships and loan funds. 

Ohio Xorthern University ♦ Ada (2,321 pop.); for men (792) And women (319); 
M. Iv control; tuition, $150; fees, $7; hd. and rm., $180; minimum expense, $325; 
arts and sciences, engineering, commerce, education, music, law, and pharmacy 

U'\). 

'Ohio State University, Columbus (237,031 }>op.); for men (7,10S) and women 
\3,0<5); State control; tuition, $60 (iiunro.s., $165); foes, $6; bd. and nn., $400; 
minimum cx[>ehHe, $000; land-grant college; srts and sciences, agriculture, archi- 
tecture, commerce (A), education, engineering, home economics, journalism (A); 
law (A), medicine (A), dentistry (A), pharmacy, optics, veterinary medicine; 
loan funds. 

'Ohio University, Athens (0,4 1 S pop,); for men (1,045) and women (1,166): 
State control; tuition, $80; bd. and rm., $216; minimum expense. $381; arts and 
sciences, commerce, education, engineering, and music; loan funds, 

'Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware (8,756 pop.); fa"* men (800) and women 
i9l6>; M. K. control; tuition* $250; fees, $17; bd. and rm., $300; minimum 
expense, $700 (men), $900 (women); arts and sciences, fine arts, and music; 
scholarships and Ioann. 

*Ottrrl>ein College , Westerville (!i*480 ]>op.); for men (239) and women (297); 

I . H. control; tuition, $125; fees, $20; be!, and rm,, $235; minimurfi expense, 
$455 ; arts and sciences, fine arts, and music; scholarships and loans. 

Oxford College for Women, Oxford, merged with Western College for Women, 
January, 1929. 

Rio Grande College, Rio Grande (161 pop ); for men (136) and women (178); 
F. Hapt. control; tuition, $40; fees, $15; bd. and rm., $216; minimum expense, 
$326; arts and sciences. 


St, John's University, Toledo (234T04 pop.) ; for men 
R. C. control; tuition, $125; (90s, ’ 


(127) and women (232); 
(day college) ; nrts ami sciences 


' » I . - — f JhJV , ~ N J -P'- f I 

'St. Xavier College, Cincinnati: for men (360) and women (17); R. C. control: 
tuition, $150; 'fees, $25; bd. and rm., $460; minimum expense, $025; arts and 
sciences and law 


116 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


* University of Akron , Akron (208,435 pop/); for men (679) and women (439); 
city control; tuition free (nonrcs. $180); fees, $62; bd, and rm., $300; minimum 
expense, $560 (non res/); arts and sciences, engineering, commerce, education, 
and home economics. 

+ University of Cincinnati , Cincinnati; for men (5,087) . and women (3,517); 
city control; tuition, $200 (nonres.); fees, $15; bd, and rm,, $360; minimum ex- 
pense, $600; arts and sciences} engineering, architecture, commerce (A), educa- 
tion, home economics, law (A), medicine (A), dentistry; and nursing, 

* University of Dayton , Dayton (152,559 pop.) ; for men (562) and women ( 128); 
R. C, control; tuition, $180; bd. andj-m., $350; minimum expense, $060; arta 
and sciences, engineering, commerce, education, and law. 

* University of the City of Toledo , Toledo (243,164 pop.); for men (405) and 
women (244); city control; tuition, $80 (nonres.); fees, $27; arts and sciences, 

•Western College for Women, Oxford (2,146 pop.) for women (380); nonsect; 
tuition, $200; fees, $35; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $600; arts and 
sciences. 

* Western Reserve University , Cleveland; for men (1,705) and women (1,557); 
nonsect.; tuition, $200 to $300; fees, $13; bd. and rm, $500; minimum expense, 
$800; arts and sciences, social science, library science (A), law (A), medicine (A), 
dentistry (A), pharmacy (A), and nursing; loans and scholarships. 

Wilmington College , Wilmington (5,037 pop.); for men (580) and women (710); 

' Friends control; tuition, $150; fees, $10; bd. and rm,, $225; minimum expend, 
$385; arts and sciences; scholarships. 

•Wittenberg College , Springfield (60,840 pop.); for men (566) and women (436); 
Luth. control; tuition, $200; fees, $24; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expend, 
$575; arts and sciences, music, theology; scholarships and loans. 

i 

Independent Professional Schools 

Bonebrake Theological Seminary , Dayton; for men (52) and women (15); U.B. 
control; theology. 

Central Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church , Dayton; for men (33) 
and wonjpn (2); Ref. control; tuition free; fees, $25; minimum expense, $175; 
theology. 

Cleveland Y. Af. C. A. School of Technology , Cleveland; for men; engineering. 

Cincinnati College of Dental Surgery , Cincinnati; for men (28); tuition, $200; 
dentistry. 

Cincinnati College of Pharmacy , Cincinnati; for men (145) and women (10); 
tuition, $175; fees, $35; bd. and rm„ $360; pharmacy; over three-fourths oi 
students are employed. , 

Eclectic Medical College , Cincinnati; foremen (143) and women (1); rated t 
class B medical school; medicine (B). 

Lane Theological Seminary , Cincinnati; for. men (35); Presby, control; mini- 
mum expense, $360; theology; all students arc employed. 

Mount SL Marys of the W r est, Cincinnati; for men (196) ; R. C. control; minimum 
expense, $500; theology. 

St. Charles Theological Seminary , Carthagena (122 pop.); for men (65); R, C. 
control; theology; all students are employed. 

St, Mary's Theological Seminary, Cleveland; for men (135); R. G. control; 
minimum expense, $500; theology; 56 students earn their entire expenses. - 

Junior College 

Glendale College, Glendale (1,759 pop.); for women (50); Presby. control; 
minimum expense, $1,000; arts and sciences. 

Teachers Colleges 

•Cleveland School of Education , Cleveland; for women (250); city control; 
tuition, $38; fees, $20; one-third of the women are employed, 

• Stale Normal College, Bowling Green (5.788 pop.); for men (181) and women 
(710); State control; tuition, $45; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $180; minimum expense, 
$285; Btudents employed, 175. 

• State Normal College, Kent (7,070 pop.); for men (300) and women (815); 
State control; tuition, $45; fees $20; bd. and rm., $252. 


117 


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INSTnjmONS OF HIGHER education 


Nqro Collects 

Wilhcrfnrce University > Willjerforee (310 pop.) ; for men (119) and women (128); 
A. M. L- control; arts and sciences; students employed, 01. 

Oklahoma 
Colletts and Universities 

Catholic College of Oklahoma for H'orncri, Guthrie (11,757 pop.); for women 
(120) ; R. C. control; tuition, $150; fees, S 1 5 ; l)d. and rm., $.350; minimum expense, 
$000; arts and sciences and education, * 

* Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College , Stillwater (4,701 pop.): for 
men (2,442) and women (1,833); StaWfontnd; tuition free (nonres., $30); 
ier^, $26; bd. and rm., $234; minimum exjMMise, $300; a larKi-grant college; 
arts and sciences, agriculture, commerce, education, engineering, home eco- 
nomics, and music; loans and scholarships. 

Oklahoma Baptist University , Shawnee (15,348 pop.); for men (332) and women 
(465); Rapt, control; tuition, $128; fees, $12; bd. and nu., $252; minimum ex- 
pense, $392 ; arts aftd sciences and tine arts* 

Oklahoma City University , Oklahoma City (91,295 pop,); for men (631) and 
women (700); MyE. control; tuition, $120; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $350; mini- 
mum exjxmse, $£f)0; arts and sciences and fine arts. 

* Oklahoma College, for Ifomcu, Chickasha (10,179 pop.); for women (805); 
State control; tuition free (nonres., $20); fees, $25; bd. and rm., $200; minimum 
expense, $300; arts and sciences. 

* Phillip s University , Enid (16,576 pop.); for men (328) and women (551); 
Christ.; tuition, $130; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $252; minimum expense, $422; 
arts and sciences, education, fine arts, music, theology. 

* University of Oklahoma , Norman (5,004 pop.); for men (3,207) and women 
(1,090); State control; tuition free (nonres., $50); fees, $50; bd. and rm., $300; 
minimum cxjjense, $450; arts and sciences, engineering, commerce (A), education, 
home economics, journalism (A), fine arts, music, law (A), medicine (A), phar- 
macy (A), and nursing; loan funds. 

University of Tulsa, Tulsa (72,075 pop.); for men (175) and women (220); 
Preshy. octroi; tuition, $150; feet^ $15; bd.. and rm., $288; minimum expense, 
$453; arts and sciences, education, fine arts, music, and law. 

Junior Colletts 

Oklahoma Military Academy , Claremore (3,435 pop.); for men (40); arts and 
sciences. 

Oklahoma Presbyterian College , Durant (7,340 pop.) ; for women (198); Presby. 
control; arts and sciences, home economics, and music; women working, 33. 

' S orih eastern Oklahoma Junior College , Miami! (G,802 pop.); for men (75) and 
women (105); tuition free; arts and sciences; half the students are employed. 

• Panhandle Agricultural ami Mechanical College , Goodwill. (Information not 
available.) 

Teachers Colletts 

'Central State Teachers College , Edmond (2,452 pop,); for men (420) and women 
(970); State control; tuition free; bd. and rm., $216; minimum expense, $280; loan 
funds; employed — men, 80; women, 95. 

'East Central State Teacher* College , Ada (8,012 pop.) ; for men (236) and women 
(910); State control; tuition free; feeH, $10; lxl. and rm., $180. 

* Northeastern State Teacher s College , Talileuuah (2,271 pop.); for men (275) 
and women (513); State control; tuition free; bd. and rm.‘, $183. 

* Northwestern State Teachers College , Alva (3,912 pop.); for men (300); and 
women (460); State control; tuition free: fees, $10; bd. and rm., $240; minimum 
expense, $360; loan funds; students employed, 150. 

'Southeastern State Teachers College* Durant (7,340 pop .); for men (271) and 
women (768); State control; tuition free; 1x3. and rm., $205. 

* Southwestern State Teachers College . Weatherford (1,929 pop.); for men (242) 
and women (450); State control; tuition free; bd. and rm., $225; minimum ex- 
pense, $300; students employed, 65. • 



118 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


Oregon 

Colleges and Universities 
% 

Albany College, Albany (4,S10 pop,); for men (flfi) and women (43); Pnvdn. 
controi, tuition, $93; foes, $2X; bd. and rm., $240; minirnmn expense, *400' 
arts and sciences; a self-help college, each student working six hours per week. 

* Lin field College, McMinnville (2,707 pop.); for men (141) and women (140)' 
13apt. control; tuition, $125; arts and sciences and music, f 

. Agricultural College, Corvallis tf.752 pop.); for men (2,200) and womrt 

(1,1.10); otate control; tuition, S-i(> (nonros., $150); foes, $36; bd. and rm.. $225; 
minimum expense, $450; a land-grant college; agriculture, commerce, education 
engineering, forestry, home economics, music, und pharmacy (A); loan funds. 

Parific College , Xcwbcrg (2,500 pop.) ; for inen (88) and women (120); Friends 
control; tuition, $100; fees, $12; bd. und rm., $250; minimum c.nihuisc, $362 
arts and sciences. 

Pacific V nicer xili/. Forest Grove (1,915 pop.); for men (107) and women (105); 
nonsect.; tuition, $130; foes, $20; bd. and rtu., $252; minimum exiJetisc, $43'; 
arts and sciences and music. 

♦ Peed College, Portland (258,288 pop.); for men (162) and women (150); non- 
sect.; tuition, $200; fees, $17; bd. and rm., $350; minimum exjx-nse, $700; arts 
and sciences; loan funds and scholarships. 

,,\-Z ircr . 8ily Orc 9 on > Eugene (10,593 pop); for men (1,673) and women 
(1,3/0); 8tate control; tuition free (nonros., $150); firs, $70; bd. and rm., $315, 
, minimum expense, $.500; arts and sciences, architecture, coin mcice (A), journal- 
ism (A), education, physical education, fine arts, music, law (A), and medicine (A); 
loan fundri and scholarships. 

'Willamette Unirermly, Salem (17,679 pup.} ; for men (30.$) and women (300); 
51. R. control; tuition, $150; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $550; arts 
and sciences, music, and law. 

Independent Professional Schools 

Eugene Bible University, Eugene; for men (167) and women - (106); Christ, 
control; theology and music. 

Kimball School of Theology, Salem; for men (39) and women (25); >1. E. con- 
trol; tuition, $26; bd. nmi rm., $300; minimum expense, $350; theologv; two- 
thirds of students are ‘employed. 

0 Worth Pacific College of Dentistry, Portland (25S,2SS pop.); for men (449) and 
women (5); tuition, $250; fees, $15; dentistry (A) and pharmacy (A). 

Xorthwestcrji College of Law, Portland; fur men (1GS) and women (7); tuition, 
$100; law; all students are employe 1. 

Junior Colleges 

Columbia University, Portland; for men (298); nonpeef.; tuition, $100; arts and 
sciences and commerce; men employed, 40. 

67. Mary's Academy and College, Portland; for women (300); R. C. control; 
arts and sciences, fine arts, and music; women working, 35. 

, Pennsylvania 

Colleges and Universities 

♦ Albright College, Myenttown (2,385 pop.); for men (150) and women (117); 
Nor Evang. control: tuition, $100; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $285; minimum ex- 
pense, $470; arts and sciences, fine arts, and music. 

* AUeghiny College, Meadville (14,568 pop.) ; for men (370) and women (222); 
M.E.. control; tuition, $250; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $600; arts 
and sciences; loan funds and scholarships 

Beaver College, Jenkintown (3,360 pop.); for women (450); M. E. control: 
tuition, $100; fees, $30; bd. and rm., $500; minimum expense, $700; arts ana 
sciences. 



O 

ERLC 





INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


119 


'Bryn Afaur College^ Byrn. Mawr (3,056 pop.); for women (498); nonsect.; 
tuition, $400; bd. and rm. ( $450; minimum expense, $900; arts and- sciences, 
education, and music; scholarships and loans. 

* Hue knell University , Lewisburg (3,204 pop.); for men (695) and women (416); 
Bapt. control; tuition, $300; fees, $37; bd. and rrn., $400; minimum expense, 
$700; arts and sciences; scholarships and loan funds. - 

♦ Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh (588,343 pop.); for men (1.073) 
and women (797); nonscct.; tuition, $300; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $404; minimum 
expense, $825; arts and sciences, engineering, architecture, home economics, fine 
arts, music, library science, secretarial and social work, works management, 
printing; scholarships and loan funds. 

('alar Crest College for ir<men, AllentQwn (73,502 pop.); for women (188); 
Ref. control; tuition, $250; fees, $35; bd. and rm., $500; minimum exj>ense, $850; 
arts and sciences, commerce, education, home economics, fine arts, and music, 

* Dickinson College , Carlisle (10,916 pop.); for men (433) and women (141); 
M. K. control; tuition, $250; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, $000; arts and 
sciences and law. 

* Ihexel Institute , Philadelphia (1,823,779 pop.); for men (763) and women 
(035); nonnect.; tuition, $225; fees, $30; bd. and rm,, $400; minimum expense, 
$700; library science, engineering, commerce, and home economics.- 

Ihopsie College , Philadelphia; for men (50) and women (16); Hebrew’ control; 
tuition, free; a postgraduate college. ^ 

Dnquc*nc University of the Holy Ghost, Pittsburgh; for men (2,782) and women 
(580); R. C. control; tuition, $210; bd. and rm., $430; minimum expense, $640; 
arts and sciences, commerce, music, law, and pharmacy (A). 

Elizabethtown College , Elizabethtown (3,319 pop.); for men (185) and women 
(268); Breth. control; tuition, $150; fees, $23; bd. and rm , $227; minimum 
expense, $400; arts and sciences. 

* Franklin and Marshall College , Lancaster*(53,150 pop.); for men (650); Ref. 
control; tuition, $280; books, $25; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $605; 
arts and sciences. 

* Geneva College , Beaver Falls (12,802 pop.); for men (290) and women (234); 
Prcsby. control; tuition, $150; fees, $40j bd. and mi., $292; minimum expense, 
$500; arts and sciences and music. 

♦ Gettysburg College , Gettysburg (4,439 nop); for men (558) and women (71); 
Luth. control; tuition, $250; bd. and nn.,$197; minimum expense, $506; arts and 
sciences. 

'Grove City College , Grove City (4,944 pop.); for men (369) and women (316): 
no 1 1 sect.; tuition, $150; bd. and rm., $306; minimum expense, $456; arts and 
sciences* commerce, fine arts, and music; scholarships. 

! 'Havcrford College, Havcrford (590 pop.); for men (273); Friends control; 
tuition, $300; bd. and rm., $325; minimum expense, $625; arts and scieucea; 
scholarships and loans. 

Innng College , Mechanicshurg (4,688 pop.); for women (99); Luth. ’ control: 
tuition, $150; bd. and rm., $425; minimum expense, $600; arts and sciences aud 
music. 

* Juniata College, Huntington (7,051 pop); for men (351) and w'omen (452); 
Broth, control; tuition, $150; fees, $24; 1x1. and rm,, $290; minimum expense, 
1453; arts and sdfcnccs. 

* Lafayette College, Easton (33,810 pop): for men (1,088); Prcsby, control: 
tuition, $400; fees, $100; bd. and rm., $378; minimum expense, $700; arts and 
sciences, engineering; scholarships and loans. 

Lasalle College , Philadelphia; for men (98); R. C. control; tuition, $300; arts 
and sciences. 

'Lebanon V alley College, Annvilie (2,517 pop.); for men (278) and women 
(305); U. B. control; tuition, $200; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $250; minimum ex- 
pense, $480; arts and sciences and music. 

♦ Lehigh University , Bethlehem (60,358 pop); for men (1.518); nonsect,: 
tuition. $400; fees, $30; bd. and rm., $396; minimum expense, $1,100; arts and 
sciences, engineering, business administration; loan funds and scholarships. 

'Marywood College, Scranton (137,783 pop.); for women (500); R. C. control: 
tuition, $150; fees, $16; bd. and Vm., $400; minimum expense, $650; arts and 
sciences, commerce, education, home economics, fine arts, and music. 



120 


self-help fob college STtmENTa 


♦ Moravian College , Bethlehem; for men (103); Morav. control; tuition, *250; 
bd, and rin,, $450; minimum expense, $800; arte and sciences and theology. 

Moravian Seminary and College for Women , Bethlehem; for women (155); 
Montv. control; tuition, $250; fees, $50; bd. and rni., $530; minimum expense, 
$830; arts and sciences; scholarships. 

^Muhlenberg College , Allentown; for men (455); Luth. control; tuition, $250; 
fees, $50; Ixl. and rm. t $275; minimum e> pense, $575; arts and sciences; scholar- 
ships. 

* Pennsylvania College for Women , Pittsburgh; for women (346); nonsect.; 
tuition, $250; fees, $30; bd. and rm., $575; minimum expense, $1,000; arts ana 
sciences. 

Pennsylvania Military College , Chester (58,030 pop.); for men (175); nonseet.; 
tuition, $400; bd. and rm., $000; minimum e\{>ense, $1,475; arts aiid sciences, 
civil engineering, and military drill. 

* Pennsylvania State College , State College (2,405 pop); for men (3,200) and 
wojnen (520); State control; tuition, free (non res,, $150); fees, $131; bd. and 
rm., $306; minimum expense, $600; a land-grant college; arts and sciences 
agriculture, architecture, commerce, 'education, engineering, and home economics’ 

Pennsylvania State Forest School , Mount Alto (village); for men (100); State 
control; tuition free (nonrer.., $150); fees, $60; bd. and rm., $300; minimum 
expense, $600; forestry. % 

Rosrmont College, Rosernont (958 pop.); for women (88); R. 0. control; arts 
and sciences; tuition, $300; fees, $40; bd. and rm., $600; minimum e.\}>ense, $040. 

St, Francis College and Seminary , Loretto (422 pop.); for men (258); 1?. C. 
control; tuition, $100; fees, $120; bd. and rm., $320; minimum expense, $540; 
arts and sciences and theology. 

♦St Joseph' 8 College Philadelphia; for men (212); R. C. control; tuition, $150 
(day college); arts and sciences. 

*St. Thomas College , Scranton; for men (336); R. C. control; tuition, $J50 
(day schopl); arts and sciences. 

*St. Vincent College , Beatty (57 pop.); for men (231); R. C. control; tuition, 
$100; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $300; minimum cxpeiiae, $500; arts and science* 
and theology. 

*Seton Hill College for Women, Grecnsburg (15,033 pop); for women (266); 
R. C. control; tuition, $200; fees, $15; bd. and rm., $450; minimum cxjKMise, 
$515; arts and sciences; scholarships. 

Susquehanna University , Selinsgrovc (1,937 pop.); for men (255) and women 
(163); Luth. control; tuition, $160; fees, $100; bd. and rm., $275; minimum 
expense, $540; arts and sciences and theology. 

*Su'arthmore College , Swarthmore (2,350 pop.); for men (283) and women 
(277); nonsect.; tuition, $400; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $500; minimum exjMMise, 
$1,000; arts and sciences and engineering; scholarships. 

* Temple University , Philadelphia; for men (5,504) and women (4,454); non- 
Beet,; tuition, $215; arts and sciences, commerce, education, music, theology, 
law, medicine (A), dentistry (B), pharmacy, and nursing. 

*Thiel College , Greenville; for men (134) and women (110); Luth. control: 
tuition, $200; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $300; minimum cxjHmse, $550; arts ami 
sciences. 

^University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia; for men and women (17,538); 
nonseet.; tuition, $400; fees, $35; bd, and rin., $480; minimum expense, $1,000; 
arts and sciences, engineering, architecture, commerce (A), education, fine arts, 
music, law (A), medicine (A), dentistry (A), hygiene, and veterinary medicine; 
scholarships and loans. 

* University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh; for men (4,985) and women (1,757); 
nqnaect.; tuition, $300; fees, $80; bd. and rm., $40(1; minimum c\|>eiise, $780 
(men), $900 (women); arts and sciences, engineering, commerce (A), education 
law (A), medicine (A), dentistry (A), and pharmacy (A); scholarships and loans’ 

+ Ursinu8 College . Collegcville (Philadelphia); for men (215) and women (173); 
nonseet.; tuition, $210; fees, $40; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $610; 
arts and sciences. * * 

Villa A/aria College , Immaeulata (small pop.); for women (117); R. C. control; 
tuition, $180; bd. and rtn.*, $450; minimum expense, $630; aria and ncieucea. 


INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


tSf 


V^lanova College, Villanova (small pop.); for men (705); R. C. control; 
tuition, $250; fees, $60; hd. and rm„ $500; minimum cxj>cnHC. $750; arts and 
sciences, engineering, commerce, education, and theology; scholarships. 

Washington and Jefferson College, Washington (21,480 pop); for men (504)- 
nonscct.; tuition, $300; fees, $20; hd. and rm., $350; minimum expense, $750* 
arts and sciences; loan funds and scholarships. > 

Wnynenburg College, Wavneshurg (3,332 pop.); for men (170) and women (105); 
Presbv. coTitrolp tuition, 1150; fees, $23; ba. and rm., $108 to $360; minimum 
expense, $345; arts and sciences. 

College. New Wilmington (886 pop ); for men (250) and women 
(25/), ^ # j^T 8 tuition, $175; fees, $18; bd. and rm., $250; minimum 

expense, $600; arts and sciences and music; scholarships. 

'Wilson College , ChambersburK (13,171 pop,); for women (450); PrcsWy. con- 
trol; tuition, $300; bd, and rm., $275; minimum expense, $800; arts and sciences 
and music; scholarships. 

/ ndtpendeni Professional Schools 


/ tA Ca n my r° f J he i N€W Churc Bryn Athyn (392 P°P-)r for men (66) and women 
(54); Ch. of N. Jem. control; tuition, $100; fees, $80; bd. and rm., $400; mini- 
mum expense, $580; theology and liberal arts; scholarships; half of students arc 
employed. ^ 

Crozcr Theological Seminary, Chester (58,030 pop.); for men (60) and women 
(3); Hapt. control; theology. 

Divinity School of the Trot extant Episcopal Church, Philadelphia; for men (73)- 
P. E. control; theology. 

*!! a ! ,r [ emann McMcd College (medical), Philadelphia; for men (335); tuition, 
$.50; bd. mid nn.. $540; loan funds; medicine (A); one ( » ird of students are 
employed, and 50 earn their entire support. 

'Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia; for men (600); tuition, $400; fees, 
$25; ltd. and rm., $500; minimum expense $925; medicine (A). 

Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg (4,439 pop.); Tor men (61); Evang 
Lulli. control; tuition, free; fees, $10; bd. and rm.,$190; minimum expense, $350; 
theology; practically all students are employed. 

Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia; for men (87); Luth, control; 
tuition, free; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $181; minimum expense, $275; theologv: 
three-fourths of students are employed. 

Meadtrille Theological Seminary, Mcadville; for men (110) and women (15) • 
Unitarian control; tuition, $125; fees, $30; theology; nearly all students are em- 
ployed. 

Philadelphia College of Osteopathy, Philadelphia; for men (253) and women (37): 
tuition, $200; fees, $65; osteopathy. 

*i Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science. Philadelphia; for men (590) 
and women (45); tuition, $250; fees, $50; bd. and rm., $460; loan funds; phar- 
macy (A); three-fourths of students are employed and a third earn their entire 
exiienses. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America, Pittsburgh; for men (51); U. Presb. control; tuition, free; minimum 
expense, $240; theology; all studepts are employed. 

Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh; for men (9); Ref 
control; theology. 

Reformed Church Theological Seminary , Lancaster (53,150 pop.): for men (41)’ 
Ref. control; theology. 9 

Si. Charles Borromeo Seminary , Ovcrbrook (2,185 pop.); for men (280)- R. C. 
control; theology and liberal arts. 

Western Theological Seminary , Pittsburgh- for men (76) and women (0); 
Preshy . control; tuition free; minimum expense, $300; scholarships; theology: 
all students are employed, % 

* if omen's Medical College of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia; for women (96): 
tuition, $300; feea, $38; medicine (A). 

Nefro Colleges 

•Lincoln University , Lincoln University (325 pop.); for men (315); Presby, 
control; tuition, $110; fees, $32; bd. and rm., $174; minimum expense, $316: arts 
and sciences and theology; scholarships; half of the students work. 


122 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


Rhode Island 

Colleges and Universities 

* Brown University , Providence (237,595 pop.); for men (1,301) and women 
(452); nonsect.; tuition, $400; bd. and rm., $305; minimum expense, $730; arte 
and sciences, engineering, and education. 

Protndence College, Providence; for men (025) and women (130); R. C. control: 
tuition, $150; fees, $30; bd. and rm., $360; minimum expense, $600; arte and 
sciences; scholarships. 

Rhode Island State College, Kingston (580 pop.) ; for men (403) and women (121); 
State control; tuition free (nonres., $50); fees, $40; bd. and rm., $274; minimum 
expense, $425; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, commerce, 
education, engineering, and home economics. 

Independent Professional Schools 

» 

* Rhode Island College of Pharmacy and Allied Sciences, Providence; for men 
(143) and women (15); tuition, $125; fees, $30; pharmacy (A). 

Teachers Colleges 

Rhode Island College of Education , Providence; for men (8) and women (582); 
State control; the majority of students live at home. 

South Carolina 
Colleges and Universities 

Anderson College , Anderson (10,570 pop.); for women (325); Rapt, control; 
tuition, $100; bd. and rm. $300; minimum expense, $400; arts and sciences, home 
economics, tine arts, and music. ^ 

Chicora College, for Women , Columbia (37,524 pop.); for women (244); Presby. 
. control; tuition, $96; feer, $10; bd. and rm., $288; minimum expense, $484; arte 
Vand sciences. 

*The Citadel , The Military College of South Carolina, Charleston (67,957 pop.); 
for men. (721); State control; tuition, $40; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $210; uniforms, 
$160; minimum expense, $450; arts and sciences; no opportunities for self-help. 

*Clemsrm Agricultural College , Clemson College (420 pop.); for men (1,128); 
State control; tuition, $40 (nonres., $Su) ; fees, $44; bd. and rm., $199; minimum 
expense, $379; a land-grant college; general science, agriculture, architecture, 
education, engineering; limited self-help opportunities. 

f Coker College for Women , Hartsville (3,624 pop.); for women (240);. Rapt, 
control; tuition, $120; fees, $40; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $460; 
arte and sciences; scholarships and loans. 

* College of Charleston, Charleston (67,957 pop.); for men (112) and women 
82); city control; tuition, $40; fefes, $16; bd. and rm., $337; minimum expense, 
$418; arts and sciences. 

Columbia College, Columbia (37,524 pop.) ; for women (348); M. E. So. control: 
tuition, $100; fees, $64; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $434; arts and 
sciences. i 

♦ Converse College, Spartanburg (2^,638 pop.); ' r women (4^0); nonsect.j 
tuition, $200; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $625; arte and 
sciences and music; scholarships and loans. 

*Erskine College, Due West (702 pop.); for men (126)*ltnd women (38); A. R. 
Presb. control; tuition, $60; fees, $05; bd. and ^m., $250; minimum expense, 
$400; arts and sciences and theology. v 

*Furman University, Greenville (33,127 pop.); for men (507); Rapt, control: 
tuition, $75; fees, $00; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, $425; artB and 
sciences and law. 

Greenville Woman's College , Greenville; for women (558); Rapt, control; tuition, 
$110; fees, $32; bd. and rm., $210; minimum expense, $353; arts and sciences. 

Lander College, Greenwood (8,703 pop.); for women (326); M. E. So. control: 
tuition, $100; fees, $43; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, $393; arte and 
sciences, home economics, fine arts, and music. 



INSTITUTION’S OP HIGHER EDUCATION 


123 


2nTc8. $10O; '**’ $18; hd;an ^’™/SiO; $ B 460; '^anli 

£ s <s - — a; 

?" "» <*W>; 

$150; arts und sciences! ’ ’ ’ ’ M ’ *"* $25 °- n “ ni ">” n » expense, 

?tate c»,Tr,!i V ; biiUom\K < 438 ) J 

expense $422; arts and sciences, engine^ ^conSne^^A) and 'pZZl? 

^«TrT’^ c r 

‘ifX sSSm «?/™f M *®' ) j.'r n,enM54,i «• f- s °' 

sciences; loan funds • * J °°' minunum expense, $400; arts and 

tgzrz, s? s: s i***. 

sciences. ’ nn - * 2K °’ m, " ,rmln > expense, $480; arts and 

I nJepenJenl Professional Schools 

Erskinc Theological Seminary, Due West- for men mu- a n p™„u . , 

tuition, free; bd. and rm., $225; theology * K ‘ 1 control J 

pi" y " l 1 ; 1 U ri r ’ U-rnf-i^ r ^» 50? thSrVoRiv ; f< xTo TtT.denf « ^ i re L cm': 

Negro Colleges 

B »P‘- ®ntrol: 

the**, ; .t.'.dcnte craplo.IS!^). ' homc ec0 “ mi '«. ouJ 

iicr\ tC ^O r icullural and Mechanical College, Orangcborg (7 290 non I- for 
Uoli and woincn (327P S<nt^> m ni. n i. «„•*. “ 1 ‘^' jUur K, '.;>* 5#u P°P-;, lor men 

students working' 111.’ ’ tu,t,on frec; mimmum expense, $130; 

South Dakota ) 

Coll gts and Universities 


(25 - 282 P° p .) f for men (lOO); R. c. control; 
rm. $300; minimum expense $375; arts and 


t nit ion $ 100 ; fees $ 50 ; l>< 4 . and 
BCirnces; ucholnnships. 

31590°— 29 9 


k 


124 


T 


SELF-HELP 




LLEGE STUDENTS 


*Un 

women 


ivcrsity of South Dakota , Vermilion (2,590 |>op.); for men (577) and 
1 (453); Stntc control; tuition, $50 (nonres. $75); fees, $30; bd. and rru., 
$222; minitTiiitn expense, $350; arts and sciences, engineering, music, law (A), 
and medicine (A). 

*} ankton College, Yankton (5,024 pop.) ; for men (152) and women (169); 
nonsect ; tuition, $120; fees, $20; bd. and nn., $250; minimum ($|>crise, $400; 
arts and sciences and music. " 


Junior Colleges 


0 csxinyton Springs Junior College , Wessington Springs (1,618 pop.); for men 
(60) and women (SO); F. Meth. control; tuition, $H0; fees, $20; bd. and rm. 
$180; minimum expense, $2S(); arts and sciences; half the students are employed. 

Teachers Colleges 

'Eastern Stale Teachers College , Mudison (4,144 pop.); for men (SO) and 
women (236); State control; tuition, $50; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $243; minimum 
exj>onse, $350; 07 students are employed, 

♦ Northern Normal and Industrial School , Aberdeen (14,537 pop.) ; for men (2 (E>) 
and women (557); State control; tuition, #50; fees, $30; bd. and rm., $220; 
minimum expense, $400; students employed, 320. 

Southern Slate Normal School, Springfield (719 pop.); for men (70) and women 
(161); Sudc control; tuition, $50; fees, $12; bd. and rm. $180; minimum ex- 
pense, $255; students employed, 72. ' 

AS pear fish Normal School , Spearfish (1,254 pop.); for men (37) and women 
(117); State control; tuition, #50; bd. and rm., $207, minimum expense $293, 

Tennessee 

* * 

Colleges and Universities 

Bnhd College, McKenzie (1.639 pop.); for men (53) and wnmrnf 83); Preshv. 
control; tuition, |(»0; foes, *24; t>d. and rm, *216; minimum expense, 5350; 
arts and sciences, business, education, home economics, music, and theology. 

Bryunn College, Fayetteville (3,020 pop.): for men (67) and women (63); A. R. 
Preshy. control; tuition, *105; fees, *11); bd. and rm., *207; minimum expense, 
*322; arts anti sciences, home economics, and music. 

*Cnrson and Newman College, Joflursnn Cilv (1,414 pop,); for men (221) and 
women (335); Rapt, control; tuition, *(M); fees, *60; bd. and rm., *198; mini- 
mum expense, $318; arts and sciences. 

Cumberland University, Lebanon (4,084 pop.); for men (600) and women (95); 

I reshy. control; tuition, $130; fees, $40; Ixl. and rm., $208; miniinuni expense, 
$440; arts and sciences, commerce, journalism, home economics, music, and law. 

Bing College, Bristol (8,047 pop.); for men (120); Prcsby.; tuition, *100; 
nd. and rm., *300; minimum expense, *400; arts and sciences. 

Lincoln Memorial VnircrHity, Harrogate (223 pop.); for men (223) an<l women 
(193); nonsect.; tuition, *48; fees, *12; bd. and rm., *190; minimum expense, 
*250; arts and sciences. 

* Mar grille College, Maryville (3,739 pop.); for men (266) and women (440); 
Presby. eontnjl; tuition, *40; fees, *10; hd. and rm., *156; minimum expense, 
#260; arts and sciences; self-help opportunities. 

Milligan College, Milligan (325 pop.); fur men (118) and women (96); Christ.: 
tuition, *75; fees, *15; bd. and rm., $227; minimum expense, 1402; arts and 
sciences. 

, . College, Memphis (162,351 pop.); for men (319) and women 

(159); Presby. control; tuition, *200; l»d. and rm., *350 (men), *425 (women) ; 
minimum expense, $650; arts artd sciences; scholarships. 

Tennessee College, Murfreesboro (5,367 pop.); for women (189); Rapt, control: 
tuition, $100; fives, $20; bd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $600; arts and 
sciences and music; scholarships and loan funds. ^ 

*1 use uhnn College , Greenville (3,755 pon.); for men (96) and women (102); 
nonsect.; tuition, $50; fees, $29; bd. anu rm., $225: piiuuuum expeuso, $376;* 
arts and sciences. 11 1 


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INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


125 


u U l ,ion Y n \ nr * i, J t '. 3nc }j™ n pop.) ; for mm (550) an.! women (525); 

Bflpt control; tuition. *09; fees *33; lx!, and rm„ *222; minimum expend 
IJbO; arts and seiences; loan funds. 1 ’ 

*Cn irenity of Chattanooga Chattanooga (57.895 pop.); for men (218) and 
women (179); M. h . control; tuition, $135; fees. *50; lx|, and rm, *252- 
minimum expense, $ 162; arts and sciences. . f 

rr^ H 'Tr' " f PT'T "!’• Kn V xvill ‘‘ (77 ' S|S I**»l*-> ! f(>r nion (1.471) and women 
toiii • <'*itiom fn-e tnonres., *81); fees, *00; lx!, and rm., *215 

to J-K0, minimum expense, $183; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agri- 
rn hire, (•omnieree, education, engineering, home economies, law (A), medicine 
(Ah dentistry (A), and pharmacy (A); loan funds 

for men (331); P. E. control; 


♦(’ nirmil i, of the. Smith, Sew mice (530 pop); f 


minimum expense, $1,000; arlB 


tui'ion, *200; fees, *82; 1x1. and nil., *110; 
mid sciences and theology. • 

nZ a '1^' l/ \ r,l ! r V l ' , 'I)^}' V !' h ' ( i 1 *- 342 n,r m '’" «-'d women 

(Ml, Iinnsert; tuition, * I SO; fees, *100; Ixl. and rm. *300; minimum expense, 

, ’ . al , sni ' n< ' l ‘ K » lM1 « ,ni y nn «’ theology, law (A), medicine (A), dentistry, 

and nursing; lean funds and scholarships. 

Independent Professional Schools 


for men (106) find women (5): 


Cha/fnnttnffa College nf Law, Hint tnnt»o K a; 
tuition, SHW); law; all students arc* employed. 

iloh n mnt unde College (theological). Kimhcrlin Height* ( l .X) pop )■ for men (00) 
ami women (15); Christ, cun; ml; minimum expense *220; theology! "diihS 

Junior Colleges 

' • 

, C i nifr 'L n JJ i {/Yl r<,r ' P-voInnrt (0,522 pop.); for women (112); M. E. So. control; 
tint ion, *.00; ltd. and rni., $300; minimum exjHmse, $508; arts and sciences, home 
economics, fine arts, mid music. 

1 1 ilrnT'/' !l,,ni ' w ''". t , 1 '.<*nderson 0.181 pop.); for men (100) and women 
(I K ), nonst'ttl,, tuition, $90; ed. and rm., $225; minimum expense, $350; arts and 
snrncos ami music. ' a,,u 

Hiwas.nr College Madisonville (..50 pop.); for men (100) and women (96V 
nonseet .; tint um *15; ltd .and rm., *102) minimum expense, *225; arts and’ 
Rciwicofs; students employed, 25. 

f x r< *U rge l Pula * ki f2.7RO pop.); for women (113); nonseef/; tuition, $80* 

fees, $.50; lu|. and rm.; *200; mimimim expense, $100; arts and sciences, education’ 
home economics, fine arts, and music; women work, 10. 

rcnnc^r Polytechnic Institute, Cookeville (2,395 pop.); for men (130 and 
^oineii (1*15); public control; tuition free. 

*Tcnnmcc Wesleyan College, Athens; for men and women (229); M. E. So 
control; tuition, $1(15; arts and sciences. 

PntrmiVy n/ rraiimrc .Junior College, Martin (2.S37 pop.); for men (100) and 

™ ,T n S i ! r ‘T ,n .’ ,: lui1i ?" tn T’ fiVS> ,Hl - nnd rm • *218; minimum 

exiHiiHCt $.5(K); arts *ind sciences; loan funds available; students work. 65. 

*\\ arrf-lhlrnonl School, Nashville; for women (458); 
expense, ID55; no opportunity for self-help. 

* 

Teachers Colleges 

t-Zy™ 1 T (,ln( ’ ! ' Hcr Stole Teachers College, Johnson City (12,442 pop.); for men 
ixpen.so M $275 nCI1 * ’ S “ ' contw,; t,,i,Ion frr( ' ; bd - ftnd rm > *200; minimum 

Jf:r 0C Co/frffc/or Trackers, Nashville; for men (239) nnd women (869); 

pm ate control; tuition, $lo0; hd. and rm., $290; minimum ex|)ense, $440. 

<oHli J ' llc , Tennn *™ Mate Tcachm College, Murfreesboro (5,367 pop ); for men 
(-.5x5) and women (,>95); State control; tuition free; fees, $24; bd. and rm $174* 
minimum expense, $210. ' 9 ’’ * ’ 

f,T ne 'T C , S i Ule > ■ T cn f h>T3 t r ^je, Memphis; for men (137) and women 
$260 ’ bt t control; tuition free; fees, $25; bd. and rm., $198; minimum expense, 


nonsecty minimum 


126 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

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Negro Colleges 

Fisk University, Nashville; for men (225) and women (256); A. M. A. control; 
arts and sciences. f 

Knoxville College , Knoxville; for men (101) and women (170) ; U. Preshy. control; 
arts and sciences and music; students working, 30. 

Lane College , Jackson; for men (198) and womeri (286); M. E. control; tuition, 
145; fees, $15; bd. and rm„ $140; minimum expense, $210; arts and sciences and 
theology; students employed 128. 

Lcmoyne Junior College , Memphis; for men (166) and women (361); tuition, $60; 
arts and sciences; students employed 122. 

* Mcharry Medical College , Nashville; for men (383) and women (52); tuition, 
$195; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $180; medicine (A), dentistry (B), and pharmacy (A). 

Texas 


Colleges and Unitxr tides 

Abilene Christian College , Abilene (10,274 pop.); for men (248) and women 
(354); ChriaL control; tuition, $120; fees, $27; bd. and rm., $248; minimum 
expense, $41; arts and sciences. 

* Agricult ural and Mrqhanieal College nf Texas, College Station (40 pop.); for 
men (2,547); State control; tuition free; fees, $78; bd. and rm., $250; uniforms, 
$85; minimum expense, $400; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, 
architecture, education, engineering, and veterinary medicine. 

Austin College , Sherman (15,031 pop.); for men (218) and women (115); Presby. 
control; tuition, $140; fees, $29; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $500; 
arts and sciences. 

♦ Baylor College Jot Women, JBtai (5,098 pop.); for women (1,820); Bant, 
control; tuition, $150; fees, $3TlB^ and rm., M15; minimum expense, $370; 
arts and sciences; scholarships and loans. 

*Baylor University , Waco (38,500 pop.); for men (1,214) and women (1,464); 
Bapt. control; tuition, $180; fees, $70; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense. 
$550; arts and sciences, music, law, medicine (A), dentistry (A), pharmacy, ana 
nursiug; loan funds and scholarships. 

* College of Industrial A rts , Denton (7,626 pop.) ; for women (2,385) ; State con- 
trol; tuition, $30; fees, $18; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $400; arts 
and sciences; loan funds. 

Daniel Baker College , Brownwood (8,223 nop.); for men (120) and women (ISO); 
Presby. control; tuition, $140; fees, $51; \xi. and rm., $270; minimum expense, 
$600; arts and sciences and fine arts. 

Ilencard Payne College , Brownwood; for men (368) and women (455); Bapt. 
control; tuition, $150; fees, $20; bd. and rm,, $180; minimum expense, $350; 
arts and sciences; scholarships and loan funds. 

*Incarnale Word College , San Antonio (161,379 pop.); for women (355); R. C. 
control; tuition, $150; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $220; minimum expense, $400; 
arts and sciences. 

♦Our Lady nf the Dike College , San Antonio; for women (430); R. C. control: 
minimum expense, $400; arts and sciences, education, home economics, and 
music. 

McMurry College , Abilene; for men (185) and women (290); M. E. So. control: 
tuition, $105; fees, $50; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense', $465; arts and 
sciences. 

*Riee Institute , Houston (138,276 pop); for men (839) and women (483); 
nonsect.; tuition, free; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $350; minimum expense, $550; 
arts and scicnJes, engineering, and architecture; loan funds and scholarships. 

St. Edward's College , Austin (34,876 pop.); for men (146); R. C. control] 
tuition', $140; fees. $30: bd and rm., $360; minimum expense, $530; Arts and 
sciences; loan funds ana scholarships. ’ ' 

♦Simmons UnivereHy^ Abilene; fer men (700) and women (800); Bapt. control] 
tuition, $135; fees. $25: bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $460; arts and 
sciences; loan funds ana scholarships. 


j 


institutions of higher education 


127 


$1 


* Texas Chnstian University, Fort Worth (106.482 pop.): for men (480) and 
nomen (ol2); Christ, control; tuition, $100; fees, $21; ltd. and nn $324 mini 

SCil ‘ MCt ‘ ! '’ Cumnaw * * lome economics; 

Texas Presbyterian College, Milford (940 pop); for women (83)- Prchv eon 
tm ; tuition, $100; fees. $20; b,l. and nn.,* $325 m niinum eSn’se ^ $44V Til 
&ml seienecs, home economics, fine arts, and music. 1 ’ arts 

Tcehnologieal College, Luhhock (4.051 pop.); for men (1 120) and mmo „ 
(3,4i; tuition, free; fees, $30; hit. and rm.. $270; minimum exi.Se $370* 
and sciences, agriculture, architecture, engineering, and home economics. ' 

Texas Woman 's College, Fort Worth; for women (534); M. E So control- 
£;£i* 15a ' fC0S * W0; W - and rm ' ***>-> cxjlcnse, $40^ arts^and 

* Trinity University Waxahncliio (T,85S pop.); for men (237) and women (317)- 

Sl30; f20: - srsgi 2: 

«■» 

,„ul ' n, r slly r°f Tr ZV: A 1 u ? ,ln; forraen (3,500) and women (2,000) ; State control- 
/r tlVC ' f cvs, .^ 44 '> I'd and rm., 8270; minimum expense, $450; arts and 
w'enu-s, engineering, architect ure, commerce (A), education iournalism (A) 
to- (A), medicine (A), nunlng »„d „lmrn„wv (A);’*h„Un,“& i„d i£J f u , ( ^; 

Independent Professional Schools 

Seminary, Austin; for men (36); Presbv. con- 
trol, tuition, free; minimum expense, $300; theology; all students kre employed. 

South western ItcijUmt Theological Sctniuotii. Fort Worth' for m#»n nmr i 

rftp'Ti'V 220 '’ lillpt coiltrol >.l l, ition free; minimum expcTise, $200; religious edu- 
ire emp!o"Sl CCU, ' 0iniCS ’ ,nU ‘ SIC ’ U,Kl thoolo 8 v ; scholarships; two-thirds oTstudent* 

y De>,tal C ° llrge ' H ° U8to,,; for n,pn (,32) and «o'ncn (0); tuition, $276; 

Junior Colleges 

fiur/e*m College, Greenville (12,384 pop.); for men (201) and women (92)* 
music COntr ° ’ tuitl0 "' *1-0; nrts and sciences, home economics, fine arts, and 

tuSm" Shcmui ? (,5 -° 31 P°P ■>; ^r women (06); Christ, control; 
luiiion, 5VK), arts and Hcionceaj few students work. 9 

Clarenelon College, Clarendon (2,450 |>op.); for men (80) and women (166)* 
nonscct.; arts and sciences; tuition, $100; students employed, 4a U '* 

tuS^tr C imr n; for . mrn (5l > a " d women (64); Luth. control; 

'T”""' *" 5 - «*»«», few 

CoUege of the City of El Paso El Paso (77,560 pop.); for men (44) and worn* 
rtudents woX'^S ’ , ar< ° f pu ’ ,c ' 8rllo ° l 8 - V8lc,u ; ,uition - * !) 0; arts and science* 

°J.^ ar \ h < Marshall (14,271 pop.); for men (68) and women (102) 
Donatct., art8 and science^ and fine arts; students employed, 12. 

J>^ur Baptist Coltye Decatur (2,205 pop.); for men (60) and women (48) 
oapt. control; tuition, $(>£; arts and sciences. ' ' 

Jacksonville College, Jacksonville (3,723 pop.); for men (04) and women (86) 
control; tuition, $fM); l>d. and flYi $231: minimum expense $321* *rts aru 
•ciences, education, fine arts, and music; students working!^ ’ * ““ 


128 



SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


*John Tarlelon College , Ktephenvillc (3,891 pop.); for men (511) and women 
f475); State control; tuition, free; fees, $22; bd. awl rm., $225; arts and sciences; 
loan funds available; scholarships; students employed, 275. 

Junior C ollcgt, Hillsboro (6,952 pop.); for men (t»Si and women (100); part of 
public-school system; tuition, $100. 

Junior College , Ranger (10,205 pop.) ; for men (22) and women (24) ; tuition, 
$100; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, $400; arts and sciences; half the 
students are employed. 

Junior College , Tvler (12,085 pop.); for men (47) and women (77); public 
control; tuition, $155; arts and sciences; students employed, 14. 

Kidd Key College , Sherman (15,031 pop.); for women (370); M. K. So. control; 
tuition, $100; arts and sciences. 

*Lon Morris College . Jacksonville (3,723 pop.); for men (91) and women (73); 

M. E. So. control; tuition, $100; arts and sciences. 

North Texas Agricult oral College , Arlington (3,031 pop,); for men (353) nnd 
women (120) ; tuition, $35; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense. $350; arts and 
sciences, engineering, agriculture, home economics, eninmeree, education, and 
music. 

Randolph Junior College , Cisco (7,422 pop.) ; for men (90) and women (92); 
part of public-school system; tuition. $95; bd. and rm., $231; mi oilman expense, 
$340; arts and sciences; students emplosed, 135. 

Rusk College , Rusk (2,348 pop.); for men (00) am) women (00); Hapt. control: 
tuition, $105; fees, $25; 1x1. and rm., $200; minimum expense, $3S0; arts and 
sciences; one-fourth of the students are employed. 

Schreiner Institute (Junior College), Kerrville (2,353 pop.) ; for men (276); 
Frcfihy. control; tuition, Ixl. and rm., $475 to $000; arts and sciences; uiie-fuiirth 
of the men work. 

South Park College , Beaumont (40,422 pop.); for men (98) and women (138); I 
part of public-school system; students employed, . 1 15. 

St. Mary's College , Dallas (158,976 pop.); for women (100); Epis. control; 
tuition, $250; bd. and rm., $650; minimum expense, $910; arts and sciences; 
no self-help opportunity. 

Texas Military College , Terrell (8,349 pop.); for men (140); nohscct-.; arts 
and sciences. 

Thorp Spring Christian College , Thorp Spring (415 pop.); for men (32) and 
women (38); Christ, control; arts ami sciences. 

Trinity Junior College, Round Rock (900 pop.); for men (7) and women (20); 
Luth. control; tuition, $105; arts aud sciences. 

Wayland Baptist College , Plainview (3,989 pop.); for men (100) and women 
(100); Bapt. control; tuition, $111; fees, $24; bd. and rm., $255; arts and sciences; 
students employed, 28. 

Weather for (l Collect, Weatherford (6,203 pop); for men (140) and women (155); 
M. E. So. control; tuitioa, $90; fce.^, $30; bd. and rim, $135; minimum expense, 
$300; arts and sciences; students are employed. 

Wesley College, Greenville (12,384 pop.); for men (150) and women (130); 
M. E. So. control; tuition, $110; arts and sciences; students working, 45. 

Westminster College , Tehuaeana (614 pojx); fnr men (35) and women (50); 
M. P. control; tuition, $150; arts and sciences; students employed, 6. 

Westmoreland College , San Antonio (161,379 pup.); for women (211); M. E. So, 
control; tuition, $160; arts and sciences. 

Wichita Falls Junior College , Wichita Falls (40,079 pop.); for men (179) and 
women (161); part of public-school system; tuition, $90; arts and sciences; 
students employed, 80. 

Ttachtrs Colleges 

*East Texas State Teachers College, Commerce (3,842 pop.); for men (668) ‘and 
women (1,043); State control; tuition, $30; bd. and rin., $270. 
jjp * North Texas State Teachers College , Denton (7,626 pop.); for men (468) and 
women (933); State corneal; tuition, $42; bd. and rm., $225; minimum expense, 
$267; students employed, 87. 


O 

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3 

ERIC 


INSTITUTIONS OP HIGHER EDUCATION 129 

an^wom*^ for men (320) 

e“y«!d. CX,)en8e ’ S325; ,0a " /undfl a, ' ld schoEhfps;' many ^t.Xts^S 

(I Sf aTcf VtooFiZl °?T\ S f n , Marcc ! 8 W.527 pop.); for men 

minimum expense, $500; students employed' 35.' '° n ’ * 3 °’ M ' a,uJ riu ’’ $270 » 

(2,5J) and" ; J° r m f 

$2,0 mm. mum expense, $ 3, 2 ; many students are employed. $ ’ d mT -\ 

(197»; State ^ntroP^uU^ f °J '" en (14I) and wo,,,en 

exjieiise, $322; ,»any 8tiilSei?ts ai^rn^yecf^ * a, ‘ d S270 » «"""»»•» 

women (535); State rontroi tu?Uon ’ MO^'fees* prf P '*’ H° r niC « (2l0) amt 
mum expense, $300 ’ ’ fees ’ * l2; hd - and nn - 8250; mini- 

Negro College* 

(7ST?t, l J™ouS; A s!; K™, "'\.Sf! 5 ,ir p): 1 , ‘' rn,e ;.'2f 4 >*" d '»“«» 

coUege; *•«* * ^-g™, 

Utah 

Colleges and Unioers/lies 

«g~ 

(7 g 0 S„“ d m 

expense. $325; arts and sciences, education, ’com, ^eree and fi^c’aSf’ 

( 1 , 1.1 ^/^tato^ontroi ^ tuition^ nonr*»^$ 92 ) ^ fecs^ ^ 15 ^ arts^arf 1 *^ ” omen 

engineering, commerce, education, law (A), medici’ne^A) ,^and ^hannacy 0161 * 508 ’ 

Junior Colleges 

tuition, !?* '" en * 1 19> a,lrl wo.nen (112); 

borne ionomice, Vll 2fc*!3 TT** •*"—■ 

L I>? rJ.ZT: C f‘,‘ l ' t • y gdc " (32 '“ 04 P°l> )i 'or men (125) »nd women (175). 
working 35 ' “ nd engineering, commerce, and education; men 

»»to!”i“'.ron^S M»- bd y ind'™" So“ d - '° men (l,9) ' 

*"• and ecicnci: lei, ffida^d eclio*^'; Knto 'ZTlF*"' ' 

Vermont *■ 

\ 

Collet M and UnloersiUu 

M; ass 


omen 
minimum 


130 


SELF-HELP fob college students 


o 

ERLC 


St. Michael ’a College , Winooski (4,932 pop.); for men (96); R. C. control: 
tuition, $80; fees, $17; bd. and rm. f $260; minimum expense, $500; arts ana 
sciences. * 

* University of Vermont and State Agricultural College , Burlington (22,779 pop.); 
for men (745), and women (615); State control; tuition, $275 (noures., $350); 
fees, $27; bd. and rm., $350; minimum expense, $700; a land-grant college; 
arts and sciences, agriculture, commerce, education, engineering, home economics, 
and medicine (A); scholarships and loans. 


Virginia 

Collects and Universities 


+ Bridgewater College, Bridgewater (914 pop.); for men (122), and women (108), 
Breth. control; tuition, $120; fees, $50; bd. and rm., $184; minimum expense, 
$356; arts and sciences. 

* College of William and Mary , Williamsburg (2,462 pop ); for men (672), and 
women (596); State control; tuition, free (nonres., $90^; fees, $127; bd. and rm., 
$270; minimum expense, $400; arts and sciences and laXv, 

*Emory and Henry College , Emory (192 pop.); for men (340), and women (60); 
M. E. So. control; tuition, $75; fees, $91; bd, and rm., $231; minimum expense, 
$475; arts and sciences; loan funds and scholarships. 

* Hampden-Sidney College, Hampden-Sidney (541 pop,); for men (211); Prcsby. 
control; tuition, $190; fees, $47; bd. and rm., $287; minimum expense, $600; 
arts and sciences. 

Hollins College , Hollins (65 pop.); for women (350); nonsect.; tuition, $225> 
fees, $10; bd. and rm,, $575; minimum expense, $900; arts and sciences. 

* Lynchburg College Lynchburg (30,070 pop.); for men (138), and women (124); 
Disc, control; tuition, $110; fees, $44; bd. and rm., $288; minimum expense, 
$442; arts and sciences; scholarships. 

* Randolph- Macon College , Ashland (1,299 pop.); for men (227); M. E. So. 
control; tuition, $170; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, $438; arts and 
sciences. 

* Randolph- Macon Woman's College , Lynchburg (30.070 pop); for women 
(832); M. E. So. control; tuition, $275; bd. and rm., $300; minimum expense, 
$700; arts and sciences, education, fine arts, and music. 

* Roanoke College, Salem (4,159 jx>p.) ; for men (258); Luth. control; tuition, $165; 
fees, $35; bd. and rra., $260; minimum expense, $500; arts and sciences. 

+Swet Briar College , Sweet Briar (114 pop.)* for women (441); nonsect.: 
tuition, $280; fees, $100; bd. and rm., $420; minimum expense, $900; arts ana 
sciences; scholarships. 

* University of Richmond , Richmond (171,667 pop.); for men (525), and women 
(288); Bapt, control; tuition, $125; fees, $70; bd. and rm., $275; minimum 
expense, $500; arts and sciences, commerce, and law. 

♦ University of Virginia , Charlottesville (10,688 pop.); for men (2,063), and 
women (108); State control; tuition, $150; (nonres., $190); fees, $00; hd. and 
rm., $250; minimum expense, $530; arts and sciences, commerce (A), engineering, 
education, law (A), and medicine (A); scholarships and loaft funds, 

* Virginia Military Institute, Lexington (2,870 pop,); for men^712); State con- 
trol; tuition, free (nonres., $200); fees, $100; first year outfit, $155; bd. and rm., 
$300; minimum expense, $705; liberal arts and engineering. 

♦Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg (1,095 pop.); for men (1,214), and 
women (49); State control* tuition, free (nonres., $120); fees, $1 15; bd. and rm., 
$25$; minimum expense, $600 to $650; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, 
agriculture, commerce, education, engineering, and home economics. 

* Washington and Lee University, Lexington; for men (909); nonsect.; tuition, 
$260; hd. and rm., $275; minimum expense, $650; arts and sciences, commerce 
(A), and law (A); scholarships and loan funds. 

Independent Professional Schools 

t 

+ Medical College of Virginia , Richmond; for men (554), and women (212); 
tuition, $300," res., $250: fees, $55; medicine (A), dentistry (A), pharmacy (A), 
and nursing; many students are employed. 


INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 


131 


Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary, Alexandria (18,060 pop.); for men 
(76); P. E. control; minimum expense, $450; theology; one-third of students 
are employed. 

I'mon Theological Seminary, Richmond; for men (1$3); Presby. control; 
tuition free; ltd. and nn., $105; minimum expanse, $200;' scholarships and loans; 
theology; half of students are employed. 

Junior Colltfes 

Ayeretl College, Danville (21,539 pop.); for women (258); Bapt. control- 
tuition, $90, fees, $90; bd. and rm., $270; minimum expense, $400; arts and 
sciences, education, home economics, fine arts, and music; loans; women work, 
33. 

Blackstone College for Girls, Blackstono (1,497 pop.); for women (271); M E 
So. control; arts and sciences; tuition, $100; women employed, 34. 

Marion College,. Marion (3,253 pop.) ; for women (185); Lutli. control; mini- 
mum expense, $350; arts and sciences; scholarships; women work, 18. 

Martha Washington College, Abingdon (2,532 pop.); for women (11G); M. E. 
So. control; arts and sciences. 

Mary Baldwin College, Staunton (10,023 pop,); for women (107); nonsect.- 
arts and sciences, education, home economics, fine arts, and music. 

Shenandoah College, 'liny tun (482 pop.); for men (110) and women (123)- 
I B. control; tuitW ^100; fees, $20; ltd. and rm., $200; minimum expense! 
$320; arft^and science#; students employed, 30. 

Souihcrn College, Petersburg (31,012 pop.); for women (50); nonsect.; tuition 
$2o0; arts and sciences. ’ 

Stonewall Jackson Institute, Abingdon (2,532 pop.); for women (154); Preeby 
control; arts and sciences; tuition, $80; women employed, 28. 

* Sulims College, Bristol (0,729 pop.); for women (360); nonsect.; arts and 
sciences, journalism, education, home economics, tine arts, and music' women 
employed, 10. 1 

.* \ ir gift in College for Young Ladies, Roanoke; for women (108); nonsect.; arts 
and sciences, journalism, home economics, fine arts, and music. 

, 'Virginia hdermant College, Bristol (6,729 pop.); for women (385); Bapt 
control; tuition, $90; fees, $50; bd. and nn., $360; minimum expense, $500' 
arts and sciences, education, home economics, fine arts, and music: loans and 
scholarships; women work, 50. ^ 

Teachers Colleges 


Slate Teachers College, East Radford (2,000 pop.); for women (550); State 
control; tuition free; fees, $42; bd. and nn., $225; minimum expense, $267. 

'Stale Teacher s College, Fannville (2,586 pop.) ; for women (1,074); State con- 
trol; tuition, $60; fees, $52; hd. and nn., $225; minimum expense, $300; loan 
funds and scholarships; women employed, 27. 

* '^ ate Teachers College , Fredericksburg (5,882 pop.); for women (404); State 
control; tuition, $75; hd. and nn., $225; minimum expense, $303; loan funds* 
one-fourth of students employed. 

*State Teachers College , Harrisonburg (5,875 pop.); for women (781) State con- 
trol; tuition, $30; fees, $45; l>d. and rm., $225; minimum expense, $270; loan 
funds and scholarships; women employed, 56, 

Negro Collect 

Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, Hampton; for men (710) and. 
women (1,163); private control; tuition, $100; fees, $21; hd. and rm., $170; 
agriculture, education, home economics, business, library science (A), and trades. 

Virginia Theological Seminary and College, JLynchburg (30,070 pop.); for men 
(34) and women (18); Bapt. control; arts and sciences, education, music, and 
theology. 

Virginia Union University , Richmond; for men (314) and women (107); 
Bapt. control; tuition, $50; fees, $17; bd. and.rm., $180; minimum expense, 
$237; arts and sciences, theology, and law; loans and scholarships: Btudents 
employed, 260. 


132 


SELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


O 

ERLC 


* Washington 

Colleges and Unioenilies 

°l Pu V* So u n d -Tacoma (96,965 pop.); for men (237) and women 
(21,) - _£• control; tuition, $138; fees, $15; bd. and rm., $300; minimum 

expense, $o40; arts and sciences and music. 

. yonzaga University, Spokane (104,437 pop.); for men (383); R. C. control- 
tuition, $100; fees, $18; bd. and mi., $250; minimum expenses, $530; arts and 
sciences, commerce, journalism, education, music, and law. 

n *<£ l *! C Z° l l e9C ofn'^Wfon, Pullman (2,440 pop.); for men (1,803) and women 
(1,078); State control; tuition, $20; (nonres., $150); bd. and rin„ $278; minimum 
expense, $415; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, education 
engineering, fine arts home economics, music, pharmacy (A), veterinary medi- 
cine; scholarships and loan funds. 

" f (315,312 pop.); for men (6,104) and women 

(4, 5/6); State control; tuition, $4a (nonres., $150); fees, $25; bd. and rm , $360' 
minimum exiiense, $675; arts and sciences, engineering, fisheries, library science 
(«orcBtry commerce (A), jnurnnlism (A), education, fine arts, "law (A) 
Pl^MWcy (A), and home economics; loan funds. 

College CoUcge Placet Walla Walla); for men (281) and women 
(283), S. D. A. control; tuition, $108; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $183; minimum 
expense, $273; arts and sciences and theology. 

'Whitman College, Walla Walla (15,503 pop); for men (290) and women 
L55) ; nonsect.; tuition, $150; bd. and rm., $316; minimum expense $576' 
arts and sciences. 1 * 

Whitworth College, Sjmkane; for men (40) and women (33);'Presbv. control' 
tuition, $120; bd. and rm., $252; minimum expense, $382; arts and sciences. ' 

Junior College 

. £-f Mart ££,‘ Lacey (89 pop.); for men (75); R. C. control; tuition, 

$50, fees, $-3; bd. ^nd rm., $300; minimum expense, $425; arts and sciences- 
majority of students are employed. . ’ 

West Virginia 
Colleges and UnJoersIttes 

'BethanyCollegCjBethany (400 pop.); for men (195) and women (130); Disc, 
control, tuition, $-00; fees, $30; bd. and nn., $288; minimum expense, $550; 
arts and sciences; loan funds and scholarships. 

* Davis and Elkins College, Elkins (6,78S pop.); for men (154) and women (131); 
Prcsby. contra!; tuition, $150; fees, $15; bd. and rm., $250; minimum expense 
$445; arts and sciences. 1 

College, Barbourevillc (974 pop.); for men (82) and women 

(58): r ontr( ? 1 ; t,nt,on < S100; fees, $12; bd. and rm., $225; minimum 

expense, $337; arts and sciences. 

Salem College, Salem (2,920 pop.); for men (150) and women (277); Rapt.' 
control, tuition, $90; fees, $17; bd. and rm., $225; minimum expense, $390; 
arts and sciences and music. 

* w e»t Virginia University, Morgantown (12.127 pop.): for men (1,757) and 
, (8 . 15 ^ Stat( ‘ control; tuition free (nonres., $150); fees, $67; bd. and rm. 
$216, minimum expense, $500; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture 
engineering, home economics, music, law (A), medicine (A), and pharmacy (A) 

'West Virginia Weslevan College, Buckhannon (3,785 pop.); for men (175) 
and women (175); M E. control; tuition, $120; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $270 
minimum expense, $497; arts and sciences. 

* Junior College 

n-n^'V C i? l l C ° e t \ Phi J 1 .‘K )i , (1 ’ 54 ^ P°P): for TO" 0*3) and women (150); 
P?.P 4 ' can f ,r °lj tuition, $la0; fees, $18; ijd. and rm., $288; minimum expense, 


‘ i i/uiuuu, ices, ®io, OCl 

arts and sciences; me^employed, 


ise, 


INSTITUTIONS OP HIGHER EDUCATION 


133 


,ont J? i S a / C M , ont K°, mery (2 ’ 130 P°P-): for men (189) and women 

' St . a te control; tuition free; fees, $3/; bd. and rm., $200; minimum expense, 
$300; arts and sciences and music; one-fourth of the students arc employed. 

* Potomac State School, Keener (0, 003 pop.); for men (149) and women (129)- 
Mate control; tuition free (non res., $50); fees, $20; bd. and rm., $200: arts and 
sciences; students employed, 17. 

Teachers Colleges 

Concord Slate Normal School, Athens (552 pop.); for men (f>6) and women (83) 
State control; fees, $18; t>d. and rm., $198; minimum expense, $271. 

* Marshall College, Huntington (50,177 pop.); for men (63) and women (084) 
StAte control; tuition, $30; bd. and rm., $220; minimum exj>ense, $270. 

*' SMe Normal School, Fairmont (17,851 pop.); for men (191) and women (402) 
Mate control; tuition, $25; bd. and rm., $200; minimum expense, $350; stu- 
dents employed, 100. ' 

Negro Colleges 

Storer College, Harpers Ferry (713 pop.); for men (S3) and women (G9); Bapt. 
control, tuition, $4o; fees, $13; bd, and rm., $144; minimum expense, $213; arts 
and sciences; scholarships; students working, 44. 

Ki V t gi ! ,ia Co } l J n [ r Institute, Institute (211 pop); for men (S05) and 
aoinen (382); State control; tuition free; fees, $9; bd. and rm., $102; minimum 
excuse, $1&4; arts and sciences; students working, 252, 


Wisconsin 

Colleges and U nicer sides 

* Moil College, Beloit (21,284 pop ); for men (290) and women (24G); nonsect.; 
tuition and fees, $231; bd. and rm., $400; minimum expense, $750: arts and 
sciences; scholarships and loan funds. 

* Carroll College, Waukesha (12,558 pop): for men (250) "and women (150); 
control; tuition, $150; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $310; minimum expense! 
5480; arts and sciences and music. 

* Laurence College, Appleton (19,561 pop.); for men (371) and women (441); 
M. b. control; tuition, $200; Tees, $23; bd. and rm., $285; minimum exiiense, 
arts and sciences and music. 

iAa ~! aT Milwaukee (457,147 pop.); for men (2,389) and women 
^49,); R. C control; tuition, $180; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $360; minimum 
expense, $540; arts and sciences, engineering, commerce (A), journalism, music, 
law (A), medicine (A), ami dentistry (A). . 

('allege, . Milton (834 pop); for men (90) and women (84); Bapt. con- 
trol; tuition, $120; fees, $10; bd. and rm., $216; minimum expense, $300; arts 
and sciences and music. 

*oJ fi {“? uke ^ Dou ' n S T Coll T\ Milwaukee; for women (418); nonsect.: tuition, 
bd. and rm., $400 ; minimum expense, $700; arts and sciences, 

Northland College, Ashland (11,334 pop); for men (100) and women (80); 
c ° n l rf) lj tuition, $75; fees, $10; ltd. and rm., $250; minimum expense, 
5400; arts and sciences and music. 

Northwestern College, Watertown (9,299 pop.); for men (226) and women (53); 
Luth. control; tuition, $100; bd. and rm., $120; minimum expense, $300; arts 
and sciences; scholarships. 

*Ril>on College, Rinon (3,929 pop ); for men (290) and women (190); nonsect.; 
tuition, $180; fees, $18; bd. and rut., $260; minimum expense, $500; arts and 
sciences and music. 

School of Engineering, Milwaukee; for men (145); nonsect.; tuition, $395. 

*St. Mary’s College, Prairie du Chien (3,537 pop.) ; for women ( 1 55) ; R. C. control ; 
tuition, S 100; fees, 1 30; bd. and rm., $390; minimum expense, $500; arts and 
sciences. ' • . 

°f Madison (38,378 pop); for men (5,972) and women 

(3,650) ; State control; tuition free to res. (nonrcs., $124); fees, $31 ; bd. and nn. F 
*315; minimum expense, $484 to $606; a land-grant college; arts and sciences, 
agriculture, commerce (A), education, engineering, home economics, journalism 
tA), law (A), medicine (A), pharmacy (A), music, and physical education; 
acholarslups and loan funds, ’ 


134 


o 

ERLC 



BELF-HELP FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 


Independent Professional Schools 

Evangelical Lutheran Theological Seminary, Wauwatosa (5,818 pop.); for men 
(41) ; Ev. Luth. control; tuition, bd. and room arc free; no fees; theology. 

Nashotah House f Nashotah (small pop,); for men (74); Epis. control; minimum 
expense, $300; scholarships; theology. 

St. Francis Seminary , St. Francis (1,520 pop.); for men (325); R. C. control; 
minimum expense, $325; theology and liberal arts; no students are employed. 

. Junior Colleges • 

St, Lawrence College , Mount Calvary (305 pop.); for men (150); R C. control; 
‘minimum expense, $250; arts and sciences and mimic; no self-help opportunities. 

Teacher s Colleges 

*Stale Teachers College, La Croase (31,000 pop.); for 590 men and women; State 
control; tuition free to residents (nonres., $25 to $60); fees, $12; bd.and rm.,$198. 

*Stale Teachers College , Oshkosh (35,000 pop.), for 075 men and women; State 
control; tuition free to residents (nonres., $25 to $60) ; fees, $34; bd. and rm., $300. 

*Stale Teachers College, Superior; for 750 men and women; State control; tuition 
free to residents (nonres., $25 to $00); fees, $34; bd. ami rm., $250; minimum 
expense $325. 

*Stout Institute , Menomonic (5,104 pop.); for men (206) and women (191); 
tuition, $124; fees, $22; bd. and rm., $278; minimum expense, $500; 5 per cent of 
students employed. 

Wyoming 

Colleges and Unioersitics 

^University of Wyoming, Laramie (6,301 pop.); for men (654)’ and women (615); 
State control; tuition, $37; fees, $20; bd. and rm., $280; minimum expense, $337; 
& land-grant college; arts and sciences, agriculture, commerce, education, engi- 
neering, home economics, law (A), music, and nursing. 


Outlying Possessions 
Colleges and Universities 

Alaska: Alaska Agricultural College arul School of Mines, Fairbanks (1,155 

E op ); for men (50) and women (27); Territorial control; tuition, free; fees, $10; 

d. and rm., $495; minimum expense, $55p* a land-grant college; arts and sciences, 
agricultural, commerce, engineering, anu home economics. 

* Hawaii: University of Hawaii , Honolulu (83,328 pop.); for men (442) and 
women (221); Territorial control; tuition, free (nonres., $50); fees, $20; bd. and 
rm., $400; minimum expense, $500; a land-grant college; arts and Hcic^^^ 
agriculture, commerce, education, engineering, sugar technology, home ccon ojjj^ P 
Philippine Islands: University of the Philippines, Manila (286,613 pop.) ; hJPfen 
(3,678) and women (1,161), Government control; tuition, $25; bd. aud rm., $180; 
minimum expense, $205; arts aiid^sci cnees, education, engineering, law, medicine, 
dentistry, pharmacy (A), agriculture, veterinary science, forestry, line arts, and 
music. 

Porto Rico: University of Porto Rico, Rio Piedras "(San Juan 71,-443 pop.); 
for men (404) and women (837); Government control; tuition, $100; fees. 
$40; bd. and rm., $315; minimum expense, $545; a land-grant college; arts ana 
sciences, agriculture, education, engineering, sugar chemistry, law, pharmacy (A); 
scholarships. 


i 


INDEX 


% 


Abbreviations, 76. f 

Accredited colleges, 75-13-1. 

Agriculture, 35. 

Arts and crafts, 27. 

Automobile employment, 25. 

Board and room, 2, 75-134. ^ ^ 

Care and maintenance jobs, 34. 9 

Class schedules, 5. 

Clerieal employment, 25. 

College, on limited funds, 44. 

College presidents’ statements, 46. 

Control of colleges, 75. « 

Cooperative education 38. 

Curriculum, 74-134. 

Deans, 6. 

Denomination of colleges, 76-134. 

Denominational loan funds, 16. 

Directory of colleges, 75-134. 

Earning one’s way in college, 42. 

Earnings of college men, 62. 

Earnings of college women, 63. 

Employed college men, 59. 

Employed college women, 60. 

Employment, 23. 

Enrollments in colleges, 59, 75-134. 

Entertainment work, 31. 

Entire self-support, 61. 

Expenses in colleges, 1, 45, 74-134. 

Extracurricular activities, 6. 

Fellowships, 10. 

Finding the job, 39. 

Financial aspects of college, 7. 

Food handling jobs, 33. 

Fraternities, 6. 

Freshman week, 4. 

Going to college, 1. 

High schools, students, District of Columbia, 3; transition from, 3. 
Historical sidelights, 42. 

Hotels and summer resorts, 32. 

Household service jobs, 33. 

Instructors and assistants, 28. 

Insurance, educational, 7. 

Letters from college men, 48. 

Letters 'from college women, 54. 

Loans students, 11-22, 76-134. 


135 


136 INDEX 

Minimum expenses, 2, 45, 75-134." 
Occupations, 23-36. 

Office employment, 25. 

Personal service jobs, 35. 

Population, college towns, 77-134. 

Prizes, 10. 

Professional employment, 28. 

Publishing, 20. 

Recreational employment, 31. 

Rhodes scholarships, 10. 

Salesmanship, 26. 

Savings, systematic, 7. 

Scholarships, 8, 76-134. 

Self-help, extent, 58, 61, 64. 

Service jobs, 30. 

Student agencies, 36. 

Student loan funds, 14-32. 

Trades, 23. 

Transportation jobs, 30. 

Tuition, 2, 75-134. 

Unskilled labor, 36. 

Veterans’ scholarships, 9. 

o 


* 


0 



m